Question about Honda Accord

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Replaced master cylinder on my 93 accord. finished bleeding the system and the rear line is not pushing any fluid from the master cylinder. The brake pedal does not gain any pressure. any tips?

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You have to start with the rear or you will never get rid of all the air in the system. Start with pass rear then pass driver. Then move to front pass then front driver. If you are still having issues at that point you may want to look at the lines for where the issue is. Once bleed in the right order you should have fluid to all four corners unless you have a leak somewhere.

Posted on Mar 26, 2011

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No brakes on a 1986 honda accord


Did you get a good bleed with fluid coming out at all four wheels? If they bled good, and the pedal still goes to the floor, you need to check the brake master cylinder-it is probably shot with an internal leak. An internal leak will not let fluid pressure build up, so no brakes.

Did you keep the brake fluid reservoir from going dry while bleeding? If it went real low, air might have got back into the lines.

It is not uncommon when bleeding brakes on an older vehicle for the master cylinder to suddenly develop an internal leak and require replacement . Here's why: pushing the pedal all the way to the floor causes the master's piston to push in farther than ever before. The rubber cups then travel over a section of the cylinder not usually touched by the cups-old fluid can develop a crud there and when the piston pushes over it, the cups can get ruined. To avoid this when bleeding brakes, put a short piece of 2X4 wood block under the pedal. Then the pedal will not extend the master's piston beyond it's normal travel. Of course on a new master cylinder, you do not have to do this. A new master cylinder does require bench bleeding before installing, however, to ensure no air pockets develop from there.

Aug 24, 2014 | 1986 Honda Accord

1 Answer

Free online chilton manual


Its possible it could be the master cylinder itself, It should always push fluid. Does the car have ABS? It could also be inside the ABS module if it does. I am familiar with brake systems and diagnostics, just not familiar with this year olds whether it has abs or not.

Apr 04, 2014 | 1992 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme

1 Answer

Need to know procedure for bleeding brakes on1987 gmc s15 2.8 litre 4x4 front disc w/abs


MANUAL BLEEDING

For those of us who are not fortunate enough to have access to a power bleeding tool, the manual brake bleeding procedure will quite adequately remove air from the hydraulic system. The major difference between the pressure and manual bleeding procedures is that the manual method takes more time and will require help from an assistant. One person must depress the brake pedal, while another opens and closes the bleeder screws.

In addition to a length of clear neoprene bleeder hose, bleeder wrenches and a clear bleeder bottle (old plastic jar or drink bottle will suffice), bleeding late-model ABS systems may also require the use of one or more relatively inexpensive combination valve pressure bleeding tools (which are used to depress one or more valves in order to allow component/system bleeding). To fully bleed the late model ABS systems, a scan tool should also be used to run the system through functional tests.
  1. Clean the top of the master cylinder, remove the cover and fill the reservoirs with clean fluid. To prevent squirting fluid, and possibly damaging painted surfaces, install the cover during the procedure, but be sure to frequently check and top off the reservoirs with fresh fluid.
CAUTION Never reuse brake fluid which has been bled from the system.
  1. The master cylinder must be bled first if it is suspected to contain air. If the master cylinder was removed and bench bled before installation it must still be bled, but it should take less time and effort. Bleed the master cylinder as follows:
    1. Position a container under the master cylinder to catch the brake fluid.
WARNING Do not allow brake fluid to spill on or come in contact with the vehicle's finish as it will remove the paint. In case of a spill, immediately flush the area with water.
    1. Loosen the front brake line at the master cylinder and allow the fluid to flow from the front port.
    2. Have a friend depress the brake pedal slowly and hold (air and/or fluid should be expelled from the loose fitting). Tighten the line, then release the brake pedal and wait 15 seconds. Loosen the fitting and repeat until all air is removed from the master cylinder bore.
    3. When finished, tighten the line fitting to 20 ft. lbs. (5 Nm).
    4. Repeat the sequence at the master cylinder rear pipe fitting.
During the bleeding procedure, make sure your assistant does NOT release the brake pedal while a fitting is loosened or while a bleeder screw is opening. Air will be drawn back into the system.
  1. Check and refill the master cylinder reservoir.
Remember, if the reservoir is allowed to empty of fluid during the procedure, air will be drawn into the system and the bleeding procedure must be restarted at the master cylinder assembly.
  1. On late model ABS equipped vehicles, perform the special ABS procedures as described later in this section. On 4 wheel ABS systems the Brake Pressure Modulator Valve (BPMV) must be bled (if it has been replaced or if it is suspected to contain air) and on most Rear Wheel Anti-Lock (RWAL) systems the combination valve must be held open. In both cases, special combination valve depressor tools should be used during bleeding and a scan tool must be used for ABS function tests.
  1. If a single line or fitting was the only hydraulic line disconnected, then only the caliper(s) or wheel cylinder(s) affected by that line must be bled. If the master cylinder required bleeding, then all calipers and wheel cylinders must be bled in the proper sequence:
    1. Right rear
    2. Left rear
    3. Right front
    4. Left front
  2. Bleed the individual calipers or wheel cylinders as follows:
    1. Place a suitable wrench over the bleeder screw and attach a clear plastic hose over the screw end. Be sure the hose is seated snugly on the screw or you may be squirted with brake fluid.
Be very careful when bleeding wheel cylinders and brake calipers. The bleeder screws often rust in position and may easily break off if forced. Installing a new bleeder screw will often require removal of the component and may include overhaul or replacement of the wheel cylinder/caliper. To help prevent the possibility of breaking a bleeder screw, spray it with some penetrating oil before attempting to loosen it.
    1. Submerge the other end of the tube in a transparent container of clean brake fluid.
    2. Loosen the bleed screw, then have a friend apply the brake pedal slowly and hold. Tighten the bleed screw to 62 inch lbs. (7 Nm), release the brake pedal and wait 15 seconds. Repeat the sequence (including the 15 second pause) until all air is expelled from the caliper or cylinder.
    3. Tighten the bleeder screw to 62 inch lbs. (7 Nm) when finished.
  1. Check the pedal for a hard feeling with the engine not running. If the pedal is soft, repeat the bleeding procedure until a firm pedal is obtained.
  2. If the brake warning light is on, depress the brake pedal firmly. If there is no air in the system, the light will go out.
  3. After bleeding, make sure that a firm pedal is achieved before attempting to move the vehicle.

Hope helps (remember to rate this answer).

Apr 13, 2011 | 1987 GMC Jimmy

1 Answer

How to bleed brakes on a 96 civc


Hello Vicno.

Bleeding brakes is easiest done with a helper to push the brake pedal.

If the master cylinder was empty, top it up. Have the helper push gently down the pedal while you crack the line fitting on the master cylinder enough that it allows air to come out. Generally it is a 1/2 to a 3/4 turn off the seat. Close the fitting when the pedal is down and then release the pedal. Continue this until no air is evident. Then do the other line fitting on the master. This operation will get the air out of the master and is easier than pushing air all the way through the system.

Make sure you keep the fluid topped up! If it goes dry you will need to start over.
And use approved brake fluid only! Anything else will ruin the complete system.

Next proceed to bleed the remainder of the system as described below.

If the master cylinder maintained fluid then you will need to go to the bleed screws on the wheel cylinders or calipers. Front brakes will have calipers, rear could be wheel cylinders or calipers, depending on how it was equipped.
Each one will have a screw with a hole in the center. this is the bleed screw. They are usually close to where the main line is attached.

Start at the right rear bleed screw and bleed the same as the master-------crack....push...close...release. Then go to left front bleeder and do the same. Then to left rear, right front.

Have the helper push the pedal hard after you are done bleeding to verify the fittings that were loosened do not leak.

If you would like further advise on this subject, please ask me here in a comment.
Thank you for using FixYa.
KL

Feb 21, 2011 | Honda Civic Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to bleed brakes on 1997 Saturn


The brake system bleeding procedure differs for ABS and non-ABS vehicles. The following procedure pertains only to non-ABS vehicles. For details on bleeding ABS equipped vehicles, refer to the ABS procedures later in this section.

WARNING Make sure the master cylinder contains clean DOT 3 brake fluid at all times during the procedure.
  1. The master cylinder must be bled first if it is suspected of containing air. Bleed the master cylinder as follows:
    1. Position a container under the master cylinder to catch the brake fluid.
    2. Loosen the left front brake line (front upper port) at the master cylinder and allow the fluid to flow from the front port.
    3. Connect the line and tighten to 24 ft. lbs. (32 Nm).
    4. Have an assistant depress the brake pedal slowly one time and hold it down, while you loosen the front line to expel air from the master cylinder. Tighten the line, then release the brake pedal. Repeat until all air is removed from the master cylinder.
    5. Tighten the brake line to 24 ft. lbs. (32 Nm) when finished.
    6. Repeat these steps for the right front brake line (rear upper port) at the master cylinder.
WARNING Do not allow brake fluid to spill on or come in contact with the vehicle' finish, as it will remove the paint. In case of a spill, immediately flush the area with water.
  1. If a single line or fitting was the only hydraulic line disconnected, then only the caliper(s) or wheel cylinder(s) affected by that line must be bled. If the master cylinder required bleeding, then all calipers and wheel cylinders must be bled in the proper sequence:
    1. Right rear
    2. Left front
    3. Left rear
    4. Right front
  2. Bleed the individual calipers or wheel cylinders as follows:
    1. Place a suitable wrench over the bleeder screw and attach a clear plastic hose over the screw end.
    2. Submerge the other end in a transparent container of brake fluid.
    3. Loosen the bleed screw, then have an assistant apply the brake pedal slowly and hold it down. Close the bleed screw, then release the brake pedal. Repeat the sequence until all air is expelled from the caliper or cylinder.
    4. When finished, tighten the bleed screw to 97 inch lbs. (11 Nm) for the front, or 66 inch lbs. (7.5 Nm) for the rear.
  3. Check the pedal for a hard feeling with the engine not running. If the pedal is soft, repeat the bleeding procedure until a firm pedal is obtained.
zjlimited_349.jpg

Fig. 1: Loosen the front brake line in order to bleed the master cylinder

zjlimited_350.jpg

Fig. 2: Connect a bleed hose from the bleed valve on the front caliper to a jar of brake fluid

zjlimited_351.jpg

Fig. 3: Always follow the lettered sequence when bleeding the hydraulic brake system





Hope this helps to solve it; remember to rate this answer.

Dec 29, 2010 | 1997 Saturn SL

1 Answer

How do i bleed the brakes on a 1999 Pontiac Grand Am?


Bleeding the Brake System
When any part of the hydraulic system has been disconnected for repair or
replacement, air may get into the lines and cause spongy pedal action (because
air can be compressed and brake fluid cannot). To correct this condition, it is
necessary to bleed the hydraulic system so to be sure all air is purged.

When bleeding the brake system, bleed one brake cylinder at a time, beginning
at the cylinder with the longest hydraulic line (farthest from the master
cylinder) first. ALWAYS Keep the master cylinder reservoir filled with brake
fluid during the bleeding operation. Never use brake fluid that has been drained
from the hydraulic system, no matter how clean it is.

The primary and secondary hydraulic brake systems are separate and are bled
independently. During the bleeding operation, do not allow the reservoir to run
dry. Keep the master cylinder reservoir filled with brake fluid.


  1. Clean all dirt from around the master cylinder fill cap, remove the cap and
    fill the master cylinder with brake fluid until the level is within 1/4 I n.
    (6mm) of the top edge of the reservoir.
  2. Clean the bleeder screws at all 4 wheels. The bleeder screws are located on
    the top of the brake calipers.
  3. Attach a length of rubber hose over the bleeder screw and place the other
    end of the hose in a glass jar, submerged in brake fluid.
  4. Starting at the right rear proceed in this order left front, left rear and
    right front.
  5. Open the bleeder screw 1/2 - 3/4 turn. Have an assistant slowly depress the
    brake pedal.
  6. Close the bleeder screw and tell your assistant to allow the brake pedal to
    return slowly. Continue this process to purge all air from the system.
  7. When bubbles cease to appear at the end of the bleeder hose, close the
    bleeder screw and remove the hose.
  8. Check the master cylinder fluid level and add fluid accordingly. Do this
    after bleeding each wheel.
  9. Fill the master cylinder reservoir to the proper level.


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Sep 21, 2010 | 1999 Pontiac Grand Am GT

1 Answer

How to bleed brakes in 2004 jeep grand cherokee


Pretty much the same process always used. Begin at the passenger side rear wheel. With the engine running, have someone gently but firmly press down on the brake, open the bleed valve on the wheel cylinder or caliper (whichever you have) then close the valve and repeat the process 'till no air comes out. While doing that, keep checking the master cylinder so it does not go low on fluid or you will need to start all over again. Repeat the same process on the drivers rear, passenger front and drivers front (in that order)
I always finish by going back to the first one and re-checking it. Top off the master cylinder and you should be finished. Check all lines and fittings for leaks....your system is sealed and should never require bleeding except when it has been opened during a repair.
While bleeding, do not use excessive force pushing the pedal down...that can damage the master cylinder. Always close the valve you are bleeding before taking pressure off the pedal.
It is a good idea to remove the fluid from the master cylinder reservoir with a turkey baster etc once a year to get new uncontaminated fluid into the system. No bleeding required to do that.

May 12, 2010 | 2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2 Answers

No pedal


Hello;
Did you bleed the master prior to installation? If not you may have a bunch of air trapped in the system. Start at the master and use a pressure bleeder too get the air out. If you have anti-lock you may have to have the dealer purge the system.
Thanks;
Rich
RPM Northwest

Jun 04, 2009 | 2004 Dodge Ram 2500

1 Answer

Clutch not primming in r32 skyline


You either have air in the system or a faulty master cylinder.

Check fluid is being delivered from the master cyl. by slackening off the hydraulic line connection at the master cylinder while depressing pedal.
Until fluid is able to be delivered from the master cyl. itself you have no hope of bleeding the rest of the system.

As with all hydraulic bleeding processes, only release the fluid line when the pedal is being pushed slowly down or held down against the return spring pressure of the clutch pressure plate - re-tighten it on the upward stroke of the pedal to stop it drawing air back into the system.

If you are confident that there is fluid delivery from the master cyl. move to the clutch slave cylinder.

Again only open the bleeder valve when the pedal is being pushed slowly down (i.e. the hydraulic system is pressurised).

(If you keep the master cylinder full of hydraulic fluid, sometimes gravity will cause the line to 'self bleed' if the bleed nipple is left slightly open for several minutes at the start of the bleed process).
When fluid appears, finish the slave cylinder air bleed in the normal way.

If you have the time to spare, I have often found that provided the master cylinder is kept full, leaving the system overnight will allow a lot of the air to leave the system (gravity helps).

May 31, 2009 | 2002 Nissan Altima

1 Answer

How dificult is it to replace a wheel cylinder in a 2000 Jeep.


On a scale of 1-10, its about a 3. It's a bolt out, bolt in item. Remove the brake linings, detach the brake line, using a flair nut wrench to avoid damage. (if frozen, remove line completely & replace. line can be cut above nut and 6pt socket can be used to remove it.). Unbolt cylinder and push it through the backing plate. Reverse process to install. When finished, re-fill master cyl and open bleeder screw on new cyl. push brake pedal down gently with your hand (do not use your foot or push hard...you can damage the master cyl) and keep it down while someone closes the bleeder. Open the r/r bleeder and do same thing. till no air comes out. repeat again at l/r.Close it up, re-fill master and your'e finished. (note: if master was dry before you began repair, re-fill and begin bleeding process at master before bleeding either rear cyl.While bleeding, closely monitor master level so you do not run dry)
Note: It is advised that brqake linings be replaced after any leak. If you cannot afford, wash linings and drum in strong soapy water & dry off before using. not as good as new, but better than oil soaked!

Feb 13, 2009 | 2000 Jeep Wrangler

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