Question about Buick Century

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I changed the brake pads but the brake pedal goes alway to the floor itried bleeding the driver side tire but every time i step on the pedal with the bolt all the way tightened it is still sucking in air. how do i bleed the air out of the brake line????

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If you changed the pads, you shouldn't have to bleed the brakes... unless you remove the brake hose from the caliper?

The way I bleed brakes, is with two people.
Make sure you have the right brake fluid. It should be marked on the cap of the master cylinder or in your owner's manual. You'll be looking for something like DOT2. 12 ounces could be enough for front and rear?
Top off your brake fluid in the master cylinder.
Don't get any brake fluid on your paint. If you do, clean it up right away.
Loosen the bleeder screw on the brake caliper about a quarter turn. I use the box end of the wrench.
Leave the wrench on the screw, and press your finger lightly over the hole in the end of the screw.
Have your buddy slowly pump the brake pedal, and the fluid will push past your finger.
Everytime the pedal is released, your finger will stop air from getting sucked back in.
After about 4 pumps, with your finger stll covering the hole, tighten the bleeder screw and go top-off the brake fluid in the master cylinder.
8 pumps on each of the front brakes should do it. The rears may take 10-12 pumps.
If there is air in the line, you'll be able to feel it as it blows past your finger in the brake fluid.
Good luck.

Posted on Mar 25, 2011

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Normally changing the brake pads doesn't require brake bleeding.

If the valve is tightened all the way clockwise and it is still drawing in air, you might want to get a new bleeder valve from the Help! section of the auto parts store or via some online parts house.

There are several ways to bleed auto brakes.

  • Most auto parts stores sell 1-person bleeder devices that have a check valve at the end of a hose that fits over the bleed valve. These work so-so in my experience.
  • Another option is to use a vacuum bleeder to **** air and fluid out of the brake lines at each corner. The one I tried worked so-so.
  • So far the best method I've found is 2-person. One person holds the brake pedal down while the other releases the bleed valve and closes it up again. Some folks suggest repeatedly pumping the pedal prior to bleeding others recommend against it. I had the best result without repeated pumping and by slowly depressing the brake pedal rather than quickly slamming it to the floor.

Lastly, the correct order in which to bleed brakes is starting at the wheel farthest from the master cylinder (usually the right rear) and working your way closer (left rear, right front, left front). You have to bleed ALL four corners.

Also, if your vehicle has both drum and disc brakes, it most likely has a proportioning valve. You'll need to check the service manual or Haynes/Chilton manual for instructions on how to bleed. On my 86 Jeep I have to prevent a pin on the valve from moving, for example.

Posted on Mar 25, 2011

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1 Answer

I have a low brake pedal on 2003 toyota 4runner


Did you also change the brake pads? Add fluid to top of reservoir?

Was the brake pedal low before you changed the calipers or is this something that developed after you worked on the car? If it was there before the caliper change then it has nada to do with the work you did.

U might have a bad master cylinder.

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Its a 2012 fieasta change the servo .marster cilnder and the peddel still goes to the floor


Bleed the complete system starting with the rear passenger caliper if you don't have a bleed box get someone to help you and have them pump the brakes three to five times and hold it down then open the little 3/8 bleeder located on the inner side of the caliper the brake pedal will go to the floor but make sure they do not release the pedal until you close the bleeder back up then repeat until there is no air in the lines then move to the rear driver side repeat steps above then front passenger side then front driver side. hope this helps Jeff J&D services

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How do i turn the ABS light off of a 2001 chey malibu?


Yes, you can bleed them. But unless you opened the lines when you changed pads, you shouldn't have gotten air in the lines. Are you sure both brake reservoirs are full? If they are, then try bleeding. Start at a rear tire and move to front, with the driver's side being last one bled. Check carefully for any signs of brake lines leaking.

Nov 12, 2011 | 2001 Chevrolet Malibu

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I have replaced front rotors and pads even caliper on passenger side and rear brake pads but pedal still goes to floor


Did you bleed the brakes after doing all that stuff? You have to bleed em any time you remove the calipers

Jun 29, 2011 | 1999 Ford Explorer

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What are the proper steps to bleeding your brakes on a 1990 vw golf deisel


For left hand drive vehicles: (If the car does not have ABS system you do not need any diagnostic equipment!)

IMPORTANT NOTE: You need using diagnostic equipment connected to the data link connector of the car in order to bleed the ABS block. Follow instructions by scantool equipment for bleeding the ABS block.


1. This bleeding procedure requires two people. Remove the brake system reservoir cap, and fill up with new brake fluid until "MAX" level is reached.
2. Lift the car, or use a channel for access under vehicle.
3. Put the gearbox in "N" - Neutral position, or in "P" - Parking position for automatic transmission.
4. Start the engine and push the brake pedal firmly for 4 - 5 times to the floor, and maintain the brake pedal pushed to the floor.
5. Begin with the rear right wheel. Another person remove the dust cap and loose the brake caliper bleeding screw until the brake pedal goes to the floor. At this moment maintain the brake pedal pushed to the floor, engine idling, and tight the brake caliper bleeding screw. Use a plastic hose: one end connected to the brake caliper bleeding screw, and another end inside a recovery bottle for used brake fluid.
6. Repeat steps no.#4 and no.#5 until no air flows through the brake caliper bleeding screw. Tight the brake caliper bleeding screw, and put the dust cap in their place.

IMPORTANT NOTE: All the time check the brake fluid level in the brake system reservoir, and fill up if necessary!

7. Push the brake pedal firmly for 4 - 5 times to the floor, and maintain the brake pedal pushed to the floor, engine idling.
8. Continue with the rear left wheel. Another person remove the dust cap and loose the brake caliper bleeding screw until the brake pedal goes to the floor. At this moment maintain the brake pedal pushed to the floor, engine idling, and tight the brake caliper bleeding screw. Use a plastic hose: one end connected to the brake caliper bleeding screw, and another end inside a recovery bottle for used brake fluid.
9. Repeat steps no.#7 and no.#8 until no air flows through the brake caliper bleeding screw. Tight the brake caliper bleeding screw, and put the dust cap in their place.

IMPORTANT NOTE: All the time check the brake fluid level in the brake system reservoir, and fill up if necessary!

10. Push the brake pedal firmly for 4 - 5 times to the floor, and maintain the brake pedal pushed to the floor, engine idling.
11. Continue with the front right wheel. Another person remove the dust cap and loose the brake caliper bleeding screw until the brake pedal goes to the floor. At this moment maintain the brake pedal pushed to the floor, engine idling, and tight the brake caliper bleeding screw. Use a plastic hose: one end connected to the brake caliper bleeding screw, and another end inside a recovery bottle for used brake fluid.
12. Repeat steps no.#10 and no.#11 until no air flows through the brake caliper bleeding screw. Tight the brake caliper bleeding screw, and put the dust cap in their place.

IMPORTANT NOTE: All the time check the brake fluid level in the brake system reservoir, and fill up if necessary!

13. Push the brake pedal firmly for 4 - 5 times to the floor, and maintain the brake pedal pushed to the floor, engine idling.
14. Continue with the front left wheel. Another person remove the dust cap and loose the brake caliper bleeding screw until the brake pedal goes to the floor. At this moment maintain the brake pedal pushed to the floor, engine idling, and tight the brake caliper bleeding screw. Use a plastic hose: one end connected to the brake caliper bleeding screw, and another end inside a recovery bottle for used brake fluid.
15. Repeat steps no.#13 and no.#14 until no air flows through the brake caliper bleeding screw. Tight the brake caliper bleeding screw, and put the dust cap in their place.
16. Now the brakes are bleeded. Check the brake fluid level in the reservoir. Fill up with new brake fluid until "MAX" level is reached. Put back the brake reservoir cap.
17. Test the car brake system. The brake pedal movement no more than 1/3 of total stroke until the floor, when brake pedal is applied. Maximum admissible is 1/2 of total stroke.

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How to bleed the brakes on a1999 chevrolet venture van instaslled new brake pads on front tired to bleed brake pedal all the way up when van not running - goes to floor when van is running


Start with brake in the rear that is the farthest away from the master cylinder ( if your master cylinder is on drivers side start with passenger rear,pump up brake pedal until hard have someone else open bleeder valve until air or fluid squirts out,while holding brake pressure even if goes to the floor dont release pedal until bleeder valve is tightened or you will **** air back into the line,do this several times making sure you get a full stream of brake fluid and no air,continue to other rear wheel and then proceed to front wheel furthest from master cylinderand then final wheel. if you still don't have brakes change master cylinder and bleed all brakes again.

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2 Answers

Replaced frond brake pads, brakes now go all way to floor, tried to bleed but cannt get brake pedal at all. Some fluid coming out of bleeders during bleeding.


you shouldnt have to bleed anything when just doing brakes,unless you opened the bleeders and this did not have to be done, if this is what was done then bleeding is needed,close all bleeders, have someone in car, pump pedal 3 times and hold down open bleeder tell them to keep preasure on pedal as it goes down then close bleeder and then tell them to pump again and hold do this a few times on each side starting at the right rear wheel then to left rear then right front then left front always keep an eye on fluid level in master cylinder always keep it full, dont let it empty, bleed all wheels,

Apr 21, 2010 | 1998 Ford Ranger SuperCab

2 Answers

Front brakes installation


1) Block rear wheels and place Park brake ON
2) Jack up front end and use Jack Stands. If you dont have Jack Stands, you can use the Car Jack but when you remove the tire, slide the tire under the vehicle so that if it does fall off of the jack, it will land on the tire/rim and not your body. Always remember NEVER get any part of your body under the vehicle when it is not on Jack Stands.!!!!!
-- You can do 1 side at a time - Procedure is the same for Both Sides
3) Remove Tire
4) There are 2 bolts behind the brake caliper (the thing that holds the brake pads on.) You may need a special tool, it's kind of like an Allen Wrench, but it is sort of Star-Shaped, You can get these at any Car Parts Store. These bolts are inside 2 rubber tubes, don't remove these rubber tubes (like I did)....
5) Once you remove the 2 bolts, the caliper and shoes may then be lifted from the Brake Rotor.
-- Note: Once you remove the caliper, the brake rotor will come off. It is highly recommended that you take these brake rotors to a shop and have them 'turned'. If you don't, then your brake repair will result in faster wear of the new pads and may cause unbalanced braking. I know... I did the same thing trying to save money.
-- Or you can get new rotors and install them. They are not that much and new rotors will last longer than turned ones.
6) Remove the outer pad (Use a screw-driver to pry off the spring-holder.
7) To remove the inner pad, you should loosen the "Brake Bleed Valve" on the caliper and push the inner pad in *Pushing the piston in* This will make brake fluid come out of the bleed valve, so catch it in a pan. Once it's pushed in most of the way, Close the bleed-valve and then pry off the inner pad. If you DONT close the brake bleed valve and you try and pull the inner pad off, it will just **** AIR into the brake system, which sucks making step 16 that much harder...
8) Inspect the inner piston for rust / debrit. If there is damage to the piston, or you see brake fluid leakage anywhere on the caliper, you may have to get a new caliper.
9) Install the new inner pad by pressing it into the piston-Cup. You have to make sure you line up the pad also...
10) Install the new Outer Pad, Make sure that the locking clip Locks onto the caliper.
10a) This may be a good time to inspect your Axle and Wheel Bearings. If the Rubber is torn or missing from your axle (CV-Boot) that should be repaired.
11) Place the rotor back on the axle
12) Slip on the Caliper back over the rotor and make sure it is lined up properly to the caliper mount.
13) It is recommended to get NEW bolts, but if you dont, then re--install the bolts. Make sure they are tight.
14) Replace wheel.
15) Do the OTHER side.
16) Now that BOTH sides are done, you must now Bleed the Brake System.
-- You will need someone to sit inside the vehicle while you bleed the brakes.
a) Without the brake being pressed, make sure the Brake Fluid is topped filled to the Full Line.
b) Start the car
c) Start at the Right Rear of the vehicle
d) Tell the person to apply AND HOLD the brake pedal. Open the Bleed Valve and let air/fluid out. The driver should NOT let up on the pedal, but let it go to the floor and hold it there. Close the valve. Tell the driver to Pump and then HOLD the brake. Open the valve again letting air/fluid out. Driver should let the brake pedal go to the floor and hold, NEVER let up. Close the valve. You can repeat this process a few times until you hear NO air coming out.
d) Check the Brake Fluid Level make sure it's to the full line.
e) Move to the Left Rear Wheel and repeat step (d) for the Left Rear brake
f) Move to the Right Front and repeat step (d)
g) Move to the Left Front and repeat step (d).
17) Your brakes should now be bled. Make sure that the brake pedal does not feel "Mushy" but should feel "Firm". If it feels "Mushy", then you still have some air trapped in the brake lines and you need to bleed the brake system again.

I hope that this helps someone out there wanting to do their own brakes. This is not a End-All and All-Knowing procedure. I may also be missing some important things/steps that you must take. I am just sharing my experience in my doing my own brakes.

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2 Answers

Changed front brake pads. brake pedal goes to floor. no brakes


Something doesn't sound right, you shouldn't have to remove the brake line to install pads. Did you have to do this on both sides? Do the new pads and the old pads look the same? Did you get the caliper on crooked? Just recheck your work first before replacing more parts. When you install the caliper, You have to hook the pad on one side first before you slide it over the rotor.

Mar 26, 2009 | 2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee

4 Answers

Brake pedal goes all the way to the floor!


I have changed brake pads before and did not lose any fluid but air can get in the lines. Brake fluid is not compressible while air is, so if you get air in your lines it compresses when you hit the pedal there fore the pedal goes down to floor and your brakes dont grab that good. You can either bleed the brakes your self by starting at the wheel furthest away from the brake fluid reservoir and unscrewing bleeder hose and letting the fluid just bleed out. (get something to catch it and dispose of it properly). Make sure you keep the reservoir under your hood full of brake fluid while letting the other stuff by tires bleed out. Work your way from the furthest tire first and the closest one to the reservoir last. GOODLUCK!

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