Question about 1995 Pontiac Grand Am

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Coolant is being used up quickly and engine keeps overheating.

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  • Master
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Is there any visible leaks ,if is over heating take thermostat out see what happens ,check radiator cap for broke seal and the last thing is the water pump gone bad

Posted on Mar 22, 2011

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  • Pontiac Master
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Something is leaking would be the most likely cause. What you do is pressure test the cooling system and repair any leaks found. Pressure test the cap also. IF you were to have no leaks, check for stuck thermostat, and be certain that you evacuate all air....

The pressure test will also help you to discover if you have air pockets, as it would take forever to pump up...

Posted on Mar 22, 2011

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  • Expert
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Are you noticing any leaks under the vehicle after it's been sitting? It doesn't sound like a thermostat issue if you're losing coolant, that sounds like the block might be cracked. I had a similar issue in a different vehicle I owned. The cracks are sometimes tough to see but you can usually find them.

Posted on Mar 22, 2011

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Why did my 2011 DTS Cadillac overheat?


An overheated engine can be caused by anything that decreases the cooling system's ability to absorb, transport and dissipate heat; therefore engines can overheat for a variety of reasons. Let's take a look at some of the most common causes.
Cooling System Leaks
This is the primary cause of engine overheating. Possible leak points include hoses, the radiator, water pump, thermostat housing, heater core, head gasket, freeze plugs, automatic transmission oil cooler, cylinder heads and block. Perform a pressure test. A leak-free system should hold pressure for at least one minute.
Wrong Coolant Concentration
Be sure to use the coolant recommended by your vehicle's manufacturer. The wrong type of coolant and/or mixing the incorrect concentration of coolant and distilled water can also result in engine overheating. The best bet is to perform a complete flush and fill.
Bad Thermostat
A thermostat is a heat-sensitive valve that opens and closes in response to engine temperature. Heated engine coolant passes through to the radiator when the thermostat is in the open position. In the closed position, it prevents the flow of coolant to speed up the warming of a cold engine. When the thermostat gets stuck in the closed position, coolant stays in the engine and quickly becomes overheated, resulting in engine overheating.
Blocked Coolant Passageways
Rust, dirt and sediment can all block or greatly impede the flow of coolant through the cooling system. This can limit the system's ability to control engine temperature, which may result in higher operating temperatures and engine overheating. Once again, a flush and fill is recommended to remove debris.
Faulty Radiator
By passing through a series of tubes and fins, coolant temperature is reduced in the radiator. Leaks and clogging are some of the most common causes of radiator failure. Any disruption in the radiator's function can lead to elevated engine temperature and overheating.
Worn/Burst Hoses
A hose that contains visual cracks or holes, or has burst will result in leaks and disrupt the flow of engine coolant. This can result in overheating.
Bad Radiator Fan
A fan blows air across the radiator fins to assist in reducing the temperature of the coolant. A fan that wobbles, spins freely when the engine is off, or has broken shrouds will not be able to reduce the temperature to proper level, thus possibly resulting in engine overheating.
Loose or Broken Belt
A belt is often the driving link that turns the water pump at the correct speed for proper coolant flow through the cooling system. If a belt is loose or broken, it cannot maintain the proper speed, thus resulting in poor coolant flow and ultimately, engine overheating.
Faulty Water Pump
Known as the 'heart' of the cooling system, the water pump is responsible for pressurizing and propelling engine coolant through the cooling system. Any malfunction of the water pump, including eroded impeller vanes, seepage or wobble in the pump shaft, can prevent adequate coolant flow and result in engine overheating.

Oct 13, 2016 | 2011 Cadillac DTS

Tip

Vehicle overheating tips


If your vehicle engine coolant temperature gauge indicates overheating, if you experience a loss of power,or if you hear a loud knocking or pinging noise, the engine has probably overheated. You should follow this procedure............

Pull safe off the road, stop the vehicle and turn on our emergency flasher. Put the transmission in "P" (automatic) or neutral (manual) and apply the parking brake. Turn off the air conditioning if it is being used.

If coolant or steam is boiling out of the radiator or reservoir, stop the engine. Wait until the steam subsides before opening the hood. If there is no coolant boiling over the steam, leave the engine running. CAUTION: To avoid personal injury, keep the hood closed until there is not steam. Escaping steam or coolant is a sign of very hing pressure.

Visually check to see if the engine drive belt (fan belt) is broken or loose. Lock for obvious coolant leaks from the radiator, hoses, and under the vehicle. However, note that water draining from the air conditioning is normal if it has been used. CAUTION: When the engine is running, keep hands and clothing away from the moving fan engine drive belt.

If the engine drive belt is broken or the coolant is leaking, stop the engine immediately and call your mechanic of assistance.

If the engine drive belt is okay and there are no obvious leaks, you may help the engine cool down more quickly by running it at about 1500 rpm for a few minutes with the accelerator pedal lightly depressed.

Check the coolant reservoir. If it is dry, add coolant to the reservoir while the engine is running. Fill it about half full. CAUTION:Do not attempt to remove the radiator cap when the radiator are hot. Serious injury could result from scalding hot fluid and steam blown out under pressure.

After the engine coolant temperature has cooled to normal, again check the coolant level in the reservoir. If necessary, bring it up to half full again. Serious coolant loos indicates a leak in the system. You should have it checked as soon as possible at your mechanic's workshop.

Good luck.

on Nov 08, 2010 | Toyota Pickup Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Why is the temperature light keep coming on and the gauge keep going up and down?


Temperature Warning Light is on Inspection Service How this system works: With the exception of older, air-cooled vehicles, cars rely on a liquid called coolant (or antifreeze) to keep the engine at an optimal temperature. Coolant is a mixture of water and ethylene glycol, and it circulates around the engine block and absorbs excess heat, which keeps the engine from overheating. The coolant converts that heat to air in the radiator, and then the air is emitted, at which time the coolant is ready to absorb more heat. Without coolant, the engine would quickly ruin itself with its own heat production. Common reasons for this to happen:
  • Coolant is low or weak: The most common culprit when an engine overheats is low or weak coolant. If your car doesn't have enough coolant, then it can't absorb enough heat. While your car will naturally lose small amounts of coolant over the years, a leak is the most likely cause of low coolant levels.The proper ratio of coolant to water can also get distorted, resulting in a problem. Too little or even too much antifreeze can dramatically lower the boiling point of the coolant. A proper ratio of antifreeze to water is 50/50 to 60/40, depending on the vehicle.
  • Broken radiator fan shroud: The radiator fan shroud directs the airflow across the radiator so the air can absorb the coolant's heat. When the fan shroud breaks or becomes dislodged, air fails to enter the radiator, and the coolant will no longer have a place to direct the transfer of heat.
  • Broken or missing air dam: Along with the shroud, some vehicles have an air dam (or deflector) underneath the vehicle. If this is broken or missing then the air can pass underneath the vehicle but not also through the radiator, which will cause overheating. These air dams are essential in newer vehicles, as they force the air through the fan shroud.
  • Faulty coolant temperature sensor: The temperature sensor takes constant readings of the coolant temperature and sends that information to the engine control unit. Based on the temperature of the coolant, the engine control unit adjusts the ignition timing, the fuel injector pulse, and the operation of the electric cooling fan.
  • Bad water pump: The water pump is responsible for keeping the coolant cycling throughout the engine. After the coolant transfers its heat energy to the air, the water pump recirculates it around the engine so that it can absorb more heat. The most common water pump problems are a leaking pump, bad bearings, or an impeller that has rotted away due to a low coolant ratio.
  • Stuck thermostat: The thermostat acts as a dam for the coolant. When the engine first turns on, and it is still cold, the thermostat keeps the coolant from circulating, which allows the engine to warm up as quickly as possible. Once the engine has reached its operating temperature, the thermostat opens and allows the coolant to circulate. A stuck thermometer may stay permanently sealed and therefore keep the coolant from reaching the engine block.
  • The thermostat may also stick open. This will not usually result in overheating, but it will waste gas.
  • Broken engine cooling fan: The engine has a cooling fan that is deployed when the coolant needs some extra help. When the coolant temperature sensor notices that the coolant temperature is getting too high, the engine control unit (on newer vehicles) will initiate the cooling fan to reduce the temperature.
  • Broken thermostatic fan clutch: Older vehicles use a thermostatic fan clutch to engage the engine cooling fan, which is mounted to the fan blades. The fan clutch uses a bi-metallic spring that tightens when the temperature increases. This acts as a "high speed" option for the fan, and when engaged, it draws more air across the radiator.
  • Blown head gasket: The head gaskets sit between the engine block and the cylinder heads, and keep coolant from entering the engine's oil and combustion chamber. When a gasket blows and coolant seeps in, the issue is not only that the engine will overheat, but also that damage may be done to the catalytic converter and oxygen sensors due to contamination from the coolant. What to expect: A top-rated mobile mechanic will come to your home or office to determine the cause of the temperature warning light turning on and the source of the overheating, and will then provide a detailed inspection report that includes the scope and cost of the necessary repairs. How important is this service? An overheating engine is extremely dangerous. It is not safe to drive a vehicle with an overheating engine, or you may ruin the engine completely and put yourself at risk. As soon as you notice the light come on, pull over. If there is no place to safely pull over, turn off your radio and other electrical units, and turn your heat on high (this will funnel some of the hot engine air into the cabin). As soon as you can safely pull over, do so, and then book one of our mechanics to perform an inspection.

Sep 30, 2016 | 2008 Pontiac G6

1 Answer

Overheating


OVERHEATING CAN BE CAUSE BY MANY THINGS LIKE FAULTY THERMOSTAT AND FAULTY RADIATOR PRESSURE CAP,TOO MUCH WATER IN COOLANT SYSTEM NEED 50 / 50 WATER AND ANTIFREEZE.LOOK FOR WATER PUMP WEEP HOLE LEAK, IF COOLANT LEAKING OUT WEEP HOLE WATER PUMP BAD NEED REPLACING.CHECK FOR LOW COOLANT LEVEL, YOUR RADIATOR OVERFLOW JUG SHOULD HAVE COOLANT AT THE FULL COLD MARK IF NOT KEEP ADDING COOLANT INTO COOLANT OVERFLOW JUG UNTIL COOLANT STOP DROPPING AND FULL COLD MARK, IF OVERFLOW COOLANT JUG WAS EMPTY RADIATOR IS LOW ON COOLANT.WHICH CAUSE AIR IN COOLANT SYSTEM KEEPING THE ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR FROM BEING SUBMERGE IN HOT COOLANT WHICH TURN ON THE COOLANT FANS.WHEN ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE GET CERTAIN SET TEMPERATURE LIKE 190 DEGREES THE PCM AND COOLANT SENSOR WILL TURN ON COOLANT FANS, IF VECHICLE OVERHEATING COOLANT FANS NOT WORKING EITHER YOU HAVE FAULTY ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR CHECK COOLANT FANS FUSE AND RELAYS. YOU CAN CODE SCAN CAR TO SEE IF YOU HAVE FAULTY PCM, FAULTY ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR OR FAULTY COOLANT FAN RELAY.IF COOLANT FAN AND ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR OKAY,YOU HAVE CORRECT COOLANT LEVEL IN COOLANT SYSTEM, THERMOSTAT AND RADIATOR PRESSURE CAP BEEN REPLACED, YOU COULD HAVE BLOWN HEAD GASKET CHECK ENGINE OIL LOOKS LIKE MILK SHAKE HEAD GASKET BLOWED ALSO WHEN HEAD GASKET BLOWED YOU CAN DRIVE CAR SHORT DISTANCE START OVERHEATING AND YOU LOOSE ENGINE POWER SUSPECT BLOWED HEAD GASKET.

Aug 04, 2011 | 1999 Oldsmobile Alero

2 Answers

Engine over heated stalled out and will not start


FIRST OF ALL CHECK ENGINE COOLANT LEVEL IF LOW YOU NEED ADD MORE COOLANT CHECK FOR LEAKING TOP AND BOTTOM RADIATOR HOSES, CHECK RADIATOR FOR LEAKS. IF YOU DID NOT LOSE MUCH COOLANT THERMOSTAT COULD BE STUCK CLOSED.WHEN ADD COOLANT CRANK VECHICLE AGAIN CHECK BOTH RADIATOR HOSES THEY BOTH SHOULD BE HOT. IF TOP RADIATOR HOSE GOING TO ENGINE BLOCK COLD AND BOTTOM RADIATOR HOSE COLD WARM THE THERMOSTAT IS STUCK CLOSED. IF ENGINE OVERHEATING WHILE SITTING IN LONG TRAFFIC LINE YOU COULD HAVE FAULTY ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR.IT CONTROLS COOLANT FAN AT SET TEMPERATURE.IF COOLANTS FAN NOT RUNNING WHEN OVERHEATING.EITHER COOLANT FAN FUSE RELAY FAULTY OR FAN MOTOR DEFECTIVE OR FAN MOTOR WIRING CONNECTOR HAVE BROKE WIRES.IF COOLANT FAN IS RUNNING WHILE ENGINE OVERHEATING CHECK CRANK OIL AT OIL DIP STICK OIL LOOKS LIKE MILK SHAKE YOU HAVE BLOWED HEAD GASKET. WARNING DONT KEEP DRIVING VECHICLE WHEN ENGINE OVERHEATING YOU WILL CAUSE ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION DAMAGE.

Jun 19, 2011 | 2002 Kia Sedona

3 Answers

Took out the thermostat, replaced the radiator, the water is circulating in the radiator but it is still running hot. what do i do next?


Overheating can seriously damage a car's engine if left unchecked. Although overheating simply means that a car's engine temperature exceeds normal operating temperatures, the causes of overheating are varied. What follows is a brief list of some of the most common causes of engine overheating.

    Faulty Radiator
  1. A car that overheats will often have a faulty radiator. A radiator is responsible for cooling hot engine coolant that picks up heat from inside a car's running engine. A radiator "radiates" the heat from engine coolant out into the outside air. A faulty radiator loses its "radiating" effects and allows engine coolant to become overheated, thus rendering it ineffective at adequately cooling and engine.
  2. Faulty Water Pump
  3. A faulty or malfunctioning water pump prevents adequate engine coolant flow and can cause a car to overheat. A water pump serves to pressurize and propel engine coolant throughout a car's engine and radiator to increase the heat-reducing capabilities of engine coolant. A faulty water pump loses its ability to adequately pump and propel engine coolant, and can cause a car to overheat.
  4. Coolant System Leaks
  5. A leaky engine coolant system reduces the level of circulating engine coolant, which increases engine temperature and leads to engine overheating. Radiators, water pumps, and coolant system hoses and seals--all of these coolant system parts can develop leaks, which can result in low coolant levels and engine overheating.
  6. Faulty Thermostat
  7. A car thermostat regulates the flow of engine coolant. A thermostat is a heat-sensitive valve that opens when a car engine reaches a set operating temperature and closes when a car engine is cold and warming up. If a thermostat gets stuck in the closed position, coolant will be prevented from reaching the engine, which will quickly lead to engine overheating and potential engine damage.
  8. Low Engine Oil Level
  9. Engine oil, in addition to lubricating an engine's internal parts, helps to keep engine operating temperatures reduced by eliminating friction within the engine. If engine oil levels are low, friction and heat build up inside an engine, a condition that causes increased engine operating temperatures and can lead to engine overheating.

Jan 15, 2011 | 1998 Isuzu Rodeo

2 Answers

MY 2001 CHRYSLER LHS IS OVERHEATING. THERE IS NO VISUAL LEAKAGE. I PUT WATER IN IT AND IT DID NOT RUN HOT, HOWEVER, AFTER PUTTING WATER AND COOLANT, AFTER 10 MINUTES OF DRIVING, IT RAN HOT. WHAT CAN...


1. The thermostat in the cooling system could be sticking and need replacing. If it sticks in the closed position coolant cannot flow to and from the radiator and the coolant circulating through the engine will quickly overheat.

2. The water pump may be on its last legs and require replacing. If the pump has failed (and they do) the coolant will not circulate through the engine and radiator as it is designed to do and it will overheat quite quickly.

3. There could be a build up of debris in the cooling system that is impairing coolant flow through the engine. This can occur if the cooling system is not fully flushed out every 2 years and the coolant replaced. The cooling system must then be bled to remove all air. When replacing the coolant you MUST use the correct product as specified by the manufacturer and in the correct mix.

4. Radiator caps must be sound (and the correct specification) to ensure coolant does not escape and result in a low coolant condition and then overheating.

You need to get your car to a competent mechanic quickly to check and rectify the problem. (You may find it is only the thermostat as this is a common problem with time and usage.) Driving your car with an overheating condition WILL result in expensive engine damage. The head gaskets will blow and the heads on the engine will crack. Additional engine damage is also possible.

Cooling systems must be well maintained to prevent overheating and consequential engine damage.

Nov 27, 2010 | Chrysler LHS Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Overheating but reading normal on gauge . bubbling in overflow bottle .


Some bubbling may be normal. If it is overheating there may be air in the system and the hot coolant is not reaching the sensor, if this is the case you should bleed air from the system.

Coolant: Service and Repair
ENGINE COOLANT REPLACEMENT
1. Remove the radiator cap, the radiator drain plug and the rear heater unit drain plug (if equipped).
2. Drain the coolant into a container.
3. Flush the cooling system with water until all traces of color are gone.
4. Let the system drain completely.
5. Tighten the radiator drain plug and the rear heater unit drain plug (if equipped).
Caution:
^ The engine has aluminum parts that can be damaged by alcohol or methanol antifreeze. Do not use alcohol or methanol in the cooling system.
Use only ethylene-glycol-based coolant.
^ Use only soft (demineralized) water in the coolant mixture. Water that contains minerals will cut down on the coolant's effectiveness.
^ Engine coolant will damage paint. If engine coolant does get on a painted surface, rinse it off quickly.
6. Refer to the following chart and select proper mixture of the water and coolant.
Antifreeze solution mixture percentage
7. Pour the coolant into the reservoir up to the FULL mark.
8. Tighten the radiator cap.
Caution: e If the coolant temperature becomes too high, stop the engine to prevent it from overheating.
9. Start the engine and let it idle until the cooling fan operates.
10. After engine warms up, perform the following steps.
1. Run the engine at 4,000 rpm for 1 minute.
2. Run the engine at idle for 1 minute.
3. Repeat steps (1) and (2) several times.
4. Turn on the main and rear heaters and verify that heat is coming from heater vents.
11. Stop the engine and wait until it is cool.
12. Inspect the coolant level. If it is low, repeat Steps 7-12.
13. Verify there is no coolant leakage.

Oct 30, 2009 | 1999 Mazda MPV

1 Answer

Temp gauge raises quickly starting cold engine. Told it could be a coolant sensor. Is this a big deal or can I just keep monitoring my coolant level? 1995 Saturn


Any cooling system fault in JULY/AUGUST is a big deal. This sensor is 22$ and can be installed in a COLD engine in minutes.Very small cost for accurate gauge so you can monitor gauge and know if real overheating conditions exist.I would probably spring for a new thermostat while Im servicing that sensor and coolant just for good measure. stay cool

Jul 18, 2009 | 1995 Saturn Sl

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