Question about Chrysler Town & Country

Open Question

Air conditioning not cooling properly seems to have proper refrigerant charge

Posted by on

  • 4 more comments 
  • radams1028 Aug 11, 2008

    2002 pt cruiser a/c blows cool air,coolant level ok,compressor continuously recyles on and off.

  • Anonymous Aug 11, 2008

    I have the same problem. It blows air but not cold air.


  • Anonymous Aug 12, 2008

    Air Conditioning Not working. Fan blows but air is not cool. I think all it needs is fluid or freeon. No one will touch if for less then $150.00, Can I do it myself?

  • pebblesemf Aug 15, 2008

    I think my 2002 pt cruiser needs a new fan. Several days before it stopped blowing cold air I heard the fan making noise but didn't think anything due to the age. How do I change it?

    Help! pebbles

  • AMABRO Sep 04, 2008

    2004 Sebring blows cool intermittently, compressor kicks on and off too often...freon levels are good.

  • hiyo Sep 14, 2008

    Since purchasing out PT Cruiser new, the air conditioner has worked poorly at best. Going up hills, the air conditioner starts blowing warm-hot air almost immediately and going down hill it takes a little longer for the air to become somewhat cool. The system has never blown COLD air . . . NEVER! We've taken it to the dealer several times for other maintenance and asked the service department to check it out and they always say the same thing . . . It seems to be working okay.I would love to take a service manager for a 30 minute ride and introduce him/her to our not so cold air conditioner system.

×

1 Suggested Answer

SOURCE: Air conditioning not cooling properly.

get an ecu from the junkyard and replace it. Also try shorting out the pressure sensor with a jumper wire- it sits on top of the evac/drier. If the compressor comes on, replace it.

Posted on Oct 26, 2008

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

2008 Trailblazer Air Conditioner not cooling. blows warm air for the first few miles then cools. It has been recharged.


Philip, You may have to have a good tech, check,diagnose and estimate repair. Could be a few things causing poor AC, recheck your charge level,check your fan at the condenser, make sure the condenser isn't obstructed, compressor clutch could be faulty, system could be plugged with contaminates limiting refrigerant flow.You say the system has been recharged, was it done properly, if not system could be plugged. AC system should of had system checked for leaks,evacuated, flushed, new orifice tube, then recharged with proper quantities of oil and refrigerant. Check the attached links,instruction and guides, Good luck
"I hope this helped you out, if so let me know by pressing the helpful button. Check out some of my other posts if you need more tips and info."
Car Air Conditioning Problem Diagnosis Repair Help
Automotive Air Conditioning adsbygoogle window adsbygoogle push Repair...
Car AC Not Blowing Cold Enough Car Repair Information From MasterTechMark

Aug 18, 2016 | 2008 Chevrolet Trailblazer

2 Answers

2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee AC Clutch


usually cycling means it's not quite full,try just a bit more.

Mar 21, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

A/C re-gassed and still does not work ?


You first have to be sure that they have charged the system with the correct amount of refrigerant, not too much, not too little. -2) Refrigerant level could be just right, but if Radiator cooling fans are not working at full speed, a/c won't get cold. -3) a/c condenser [the thin radiator in front of the Radiator] has to get good air flow through it to cool the refrigerant & bring the pressure down.. check for blockage of air flow there.-4) if al else fails, have refrigerant drawn out, evacuate system to -25 psi vacuum for 45 min. then recharge system to proper level by volume in lbs. & oz's., not just psi. pressure. This will ensure correct refrigerant level for optimum refrigeration.

Aug 09, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Ac intermittently quits working, just replaced condenser, put dye in system at mechanics- no leaks


Have an AC repair shop hook up a set of AC pressure gauges while this is happening to see what is going on. You could have a defective AC compressor or a low refrigerant charge in the system. And as to the hot weather causing it to act up that would be normal, the AC would cool fine the cooler the outside air is, problems like worn out compressors and low system refrigerant charge levels would only show there ugly head in hot weather conditions. Also make sure the cooling fans fo rthe AC and engine are working properly. Good luck with this.

Jul 11, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How much freon does a 1993 toyota tercel hold


Print

CAUTION The refrigerant used in A/C systems is an extremely cold substance. When exposed to air, it will instantly freeze any surface it comes in contact with, including your eyes. It is imperative to use eye and skin protection when working on A/C systems.


SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

R-12 refrigerant is a chlorofluorocarbon which, when released into the atmosphere, contributes to the depletion of the ozone layer. Ozone filters out harmful radiation from the sun. Consult the laws in your area before servicing the air conditioning system. In some states it is illegal to perform repairs involving refrigerant unless the work is done by a certified technician. It is also likely that you will not be able to purchase R-12 without proof that you are properly trained and certified to work on A/C systems.


The refrigerant used in A/C systems is an extremely cold substance. When exposed to air, it will instantly freeze any surface it comes in contact with, including your eyes. Although normally non-toxic, refrigerant gas becomes highly poisonous in the presence of an open flame. One good whiff of the vapor formed by refrigerant can be fatal. Keep all forms of fire (including cigarettes) well clear of the air conditioning system. It has been established that the chemicals in R-12 (used on 1984-1993 models) contribute to the damage occurring in the upper atmosphere. 1994 models use ozone-friendly R-134a refrigerant. Under no circumstances should R-12 be allowed to enter an R-134a system, or vice versa. Never mix parts between the systems as they are not compatible. This includes O-rings and refrigerant oil. Servicing (recovery, evacuation and charging) of the A/C system, should be left to a professional certified mechanic with the proper equipment and related training.


SYSTEM INSPECTION

A lot of A/C problems can be avoided by running the air conditioner at least once a week, regardless of the season. Simply let the system run for at least 5 minutes a week (even in the winter), and you'll keep the internal parts lubricated as well as preventing the hoses from hardening.
Checking For A/C Oil Leaks
Refrigerant leaks show up only as oily areas on the various components because the compressor oil is transported around the entire system along with the refrigerant. Look for oily spots on all the hoses and lines (especially on the hose and tube connections). If there are oily deposits, the system may have a leak, and you should have it checked by a qualified mechanic.
Check the A/C Compressor Belt
The compressor drive belt should be checked frequently for tension and condition. Refer to the information in this section on "Belts''.
Keep the A/C Condenser Clear
The condenser is mounted in front of the radiator (and is often mistaken for the radiator). It serves to remove heat from the air conditioning system and to cool the refrigerant. Proper air flow through the condenser is critical to the operation of the system.
Periodically inspect the front of the condenser for bent fins or foreign material (dirt, bugs, leaves, etc.). If any cooling fins are bent, straighten them carefully with needle nose pliers. You can remove any debris with a stiff bristle brush or hose.


REFRIGERANT LEVEL CHECKS

See Figures 1 and 2
Factory installed Toyota air conditioners have a sight glass for checking the refrigerant charge. The sight glass is on top of the receiver/drier which is located in the front of the engine compartment, on the right or left side of the condenser assembly (some models are in front of the condenser/some are located on side of engine compartment).
If your car is equipped with an aftermarket air conditioner, the following system check may not apply. Contact the manufacturer of the unit for instructions on system checks.

  1. With the engine and the air conditioning system running, look for the flow of refrigerant through the sight glass. If the air conditioner is working properly, you'll be able to see a continuous flow of clear refrigerant through the sight glass, with perhaps an occasional bubble at very high temperatures.
  2. Cycle the air conditioner ON and OFF to make sure what you are seeing is refrigerant. Since the refrigerant is clear, it is possible to mistake a completely discharged system for one that is fully charged. Turn the system OFF and watch the sight glass. If there is refrigerant in the system, you'll see bubbles during the OFF cycle. If you observe no bubbles when the system is running and the air flow from the unit in the car is delivering cold air, everything is OK.
  3. If you observe bubbles in the sight glass while the system is operating, the system is low on refrigerant.
  4. Oil streaks in the sight glass are an indication of trouble. Most of the time, if you see oil in the sight glass, it will appear as series of streaks, although occasionally it may be a solid stream of oil. In either case, it means that part of the charge has been lost. This is almost always accompanied by a reduction in cold air output within the car.



0900c15280051be5.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

Fig. Fig. 1: A common location for the receiver-drier unit and sight glass. It may also be located next to the front right shock tower


0900c15280051be6.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

Fig. Fig. 2: Oil streaks (A), constant bubbles (B), or foam (C) are indicators that the system is low on refrigerant


GAUGE SETS

See Figure 3
Generally described, this tool is a set of two gauges, a manifold and three hoses. By connecting the proper hoses to the car's system, the gauges can be used to "see'' the air conditioning system at work. Do not use the gauge set as a means for discharging the system.


0900c15280051be7.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

Fig. Fig. 3: An example of a common manifold gauge set


DISCHARGING, EVACUATING AND CHARGING

Discharging, evacuating and charging the air conditioning system must be performed by a properly trained and certified mechanic in a facility equipped with refrigerant recovery/recycling equipment that meets SAE standards

May 07, 2012 | 1993 Toyota Tercel

2 Answers

Hi have an 04 hyundai tiburon i dont know where to locate where to put freon for my aid condtioner


STEPS TO CHARGING YOUR CARS COOLING SYSTEM:

STEP 1) Look under the hood of you car on the left side of your cars engine. There should be two stainless steel lines coming from a stainless steel cylinder to your cars compressor. The two lines have plastic dust caps on them sometimes they are blue or black. Usally the black has the larger diameter tubing that runs between the evaporator and the compressor. This will be the port that you hook the refrigerant hose up to.

STEP 2) Start your cars engine after you have secured the hose hook up to the air conditioner line port. Once the cars engine is running, turn your cars AC on to Max cool. Shake the can of coolant well. The gauge on the can of coolant should read in the blue but if it is in the green your air conditioners pressure will be between 0-25 pounds per square inch. This means you will have to add refrigerant to the compressor.

If your cars air conditioner pressure is in the blue. The system has the proper amount of refrigerant and you do not need to add. If the gauge reads in the yellow you may want to seek professional help because refrigerant is not what is wrong with the unit and is probably something more technical and most likely something that you do not want to attempt to do on your own. The red on the gauge means do not add any refrigerant at all and to seek professional help.

STEP 3) If the pressure of your air conditioning system is in the green it means it is safe to add the refrigerant. You should wait for your air conditioning compressor to switch on before squeezing the trigger to add the coolant. When the compressor switches off then release the trigger and repeat until your pressure gauge on the coolant can says that the coolant is in the proper range. If the needle on the gauge is in the top part of the blue you have successfully charged your cars air conditioning unit.

STEP 4) Release the attachment from the tubing port and replace the dust cap back in it's proper place and you are done. The cars air should be cool and your compressor should cut off and on less often. If problems persist you should consult a mechanic or someone that has experience with air conditioning systems.

Jun 26, 2011 | 2003 Hyundai Tiburon

1 Answer

Air conditioner not cooling


A few basic principles for air conditioner troubleshooting. For both central home air conditioner or window air conditioner, the first thing to check is whether the unit is getting proper power. If the unit uses 220 volt power be sure that the proper voltage is getting to the unit. Same for 110 volt units. A voltage meter can be used to assure that the voltage is correct.

For window air conditioning units the voltage can also be checked before and after the thermostat. If voltage is being supplied to the thermostat but not from it then the thermostat probably needs replaced. This is a fairly common problem. Another place to check is the fan motor voltage. The fan on window air conditioners runs both the indoor blower and the condenser fan. If that motor fails than the compressor may run for a short time, but will overheat and shut off. Continued operation like this will result in compressor failure. This motor can be economically replaced for larger window air conditioners, but for smaller ones the cost of replacement will be more than a new unit.

Central air conditioners for the home are more complex and there are more things that can go wrong. As with the window air conditioner the thermostat can also be a problem. The central air conditioner thermostat will only have 24 volts going to it. So don't look for high voltage there. Some units the voltage will be coming from the outdoor unit and others the voltage will be supplied by the indoor air handler or furnace. Most home central air conditioning will be supplied by the indoor air handler or the furnace. If the air conditioner is for cooling only the unit will usually have only two wires going to the condenser unit. Make sure that you have 24 volts across those wires.

The next thing to check will be the indoor blower. If your thermostat is calling for cooling then the indoor blower should be running. If there is no air moving across the indoor cooling coil then you will soon have a big block of ice formed on the coil. This can happen for a few reasons. The indoor blower is not working, the air flow is restricted and not allowing air to move across the coil. A clogged air filter would also do this. Or the outdoor condenser unit has lost the charge of refrigerant.

Finally and worst of all is when you have a complete compressor failure. Often when this happens the compressor will "lock up" or not be able to turn when power is supplied to it. Overheating or lack of lubrication are usually the main causes of compressor failure. Overheating can be caused by the outdoor coil around the compressor getting clogged with dirt, leaves, or grass. Loss of the refrigerant charge will also cause the compressor to overheat. It is the cool return gas coming back to the compressor that helps to keep it from overheating.

As you can see there are many things that can go wrong with an air conditioner and I have not come close to exhausting the possibilities here. I have just touched on the most common problems in a very basic way.
There are some basic trouble shooting things that can be done very easily. Most problems are above out of the range of comfort for many homeowners and professional help should be consulted before any attempt is made at repairs. Remember also, that the release of refrigerant gases into the atmosphere is a federal offense in the
US. Proper care must always be taken to minimize the release of any gases. A license is also required to handle refrigerants. Make sure that the professional you call has the proper certifications to handle refrigerants properly.


http://www.fixya.com/support/r3636709-size_air_conditioner_need

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3623253-window_air_conditioners_clean_every_year

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3633369-portable_air_conditioning_great_portable

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3623166-heating_air_conditioning_scams

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3597468-you_can_add_air_conditioning_to_your_hot

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3583697-how_to_keep_house_cool_without_using_air

Sep 18, 2010 | 2004 Chevrolet Colorado

1 Answer

Air conditioner not cooling


A few basic principles for air conditioner troubleshooting. For both central home air conditioner or window air conditioner, the first thing to check is whether the unit is getting proper power. If the unit uses 220 volt power be sure that the proper voltage is getting to the unit. Same for 110 volt units. A voltage meter can be used to assure that the voltage is correct.

For window air conditioning units the voltage can also be checked before and after the thermostat. If voltage is being supplied to the thermostat but not from it then the thermostat probably needs replaced. This is a fairly common problem. Another place to check is the fan motor voltage. The fan on window air conditioners runs both the indoor blower and the condenser fan. If that motor fails than the compressor may run for a short time, but will overheat and shut off. Continued operation like this will result in compressor failure. This motor can be economically replaced for larger window air conditioners, but for smaller ones the cost of replacement will be more than a new unit.

Central air conditioners for the home are more complex and there are more things that can go wrong. As with the window air conditioner the thermostat can also be a problem. The central air conditioner thermostat will only have 24 volts going to it. So don't look for high voltage there. Some units the voltage will be coming from the outdoor unit and others the voltage will be supplied by the indoor air handler or furnace. Most home central air conditioning will be supplied by the indoor air handler or the furnace. If the air conditioner is for cooling only the unit will usually have only two wires going to the condenser unit. Make sure that you have 24 volts across those wires.

The next thing to check will be the indoor blower. If your thermostat is calling for cooling then the indoor blower should be running. If there is no air moving across the indoor cooling coil then you will soon have a big block of ice formed on the coil. This can happen for a few reasons. The indoor blower is not working, the air flow is restricted and not allowing air to move across the coil. A clogged air filter would also do this. Or the outdoor condenser unit has lost the charge of refrigerant.

Finally and worst of all is when you have a complete compressor failure. Often when this happens the compressor will "lock up" or not be able to turn when power is supplied to it. Overheating or lack of lubrication are usually the main causes of compressor failure. Overheating can be caused by the outdoor coil around the compressor getting clogged with dirt, leaves, or grass. Loss of the refrigerant charge will also cause the compressor to overheat. It is the cool return gas coming back to the compressor that helps to keep it from overheating.

As you can see there are many things that can go wrong with an air conditioner and I have not come close to exhausting the possibilities here. I have just touched on the most common problems in a very basic way.
There are some basic trouble shooting things that can be done very easily. Most problems are above out of the range of comfort for many homeowners and professional help should be consulted before any attempt is made at repairs. Remember also, that the release of refrigerant gases into the atmosphere is a federal offense in the
US. Proper care must always be taken to minimize the release of any gases. A license is also required to handle refrigerants. Make sure that the professional you call has the proper certifications to handle refrigerants properly.


http://www.fixya.com/support/r3636709-size_air_conditioner_need

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3623253-window_air_conditioners_clean_every_year

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3633369-portable_air_conditioning_great_portable

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3623166-heating_air_conditioning_scams

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3597468-you_can_add_air_conditioning_to_your_hot

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3583697-how_to_keep_house_cool_without_using_air

Aug 29, 2010 | 1996 Ford Explorer

2 Answers

Leak in eavaporer coil how do i get to it


The evaporator coil is located in the heater-A/C housing, under the instrument panel.

The heater-A/C housing assembly must be removed from the vehicle and the two halves of the housing separated for service access of the heater core, evaporator coil, blend-air door, and each of the various mode control doors.

WARNING: On vehicles equipped with airbags, refer to Airbag Systems Safety Information and Procedures. Before attempting any steering wheel, steering column, or instrument panel component diagnosis or service. Failure to take the proper precautions could result in accidental airbag deployment and possible personal injury. See: Restraint SystemsAir Bag SystemsService Precautions

REMOVAL
  1. Disconnect and isolate the battery negative cable.
  2. Remove the instrument panel from the vehicle.
  3. If the vehicle is not equipped with air conditioning, go to Step 6. If the vehicle is equipped with air conditioning, recover the refrigerant from the refrigerant system.
  4. Disconnect the liquid line refrigerant line fitting from the evaporator inlet tube.
    • Install plugs in, or tape over all of the opened refrigerant line fittings.
  1. Disconnect the accumulator inlet tube refrigerant line fitting from the evaporator outlet tube. See Refrigerant Line Coupler for the procedures.
    • Install plugs in, or tape over all of the opened refrigerant line fittings.
  1. Drain the engine cooling system.
  2. Disconnect the heater hoses from the heater core tubes. Install plugs in, or tape over the opened heater core tubes.
  3. Unplug the heater-A/C system vacuum supply line connector from the tee fitting near the heater core tubes.
Unplug the heater-A/C unit wire harness connector, which is fastened to the heater-A/C housing next to the blower motor relay.
  1. Remove the five nuts from the heater-A/C housing mounting studs on the engine compartment side of the dash panel. Remove or reposition the evaporation canister for additional access, if required.
  2. Pull the heater-A/C housing rearward far enough for the mounting studs and the evaporator condensate drain tube to clear the dash panel holes.
  3. Remove the heater-A/C housing from the vehicle.
INSTALLATION
  1. Position the heater-A/C housing to the dash panel. Be certain that the evaporator condensate drain tube and the housing mounting studs are inserted into their correct mounting holes.
  2. Install and tighten the five nuts onto the heater-A/C housing mounting studs on the engine compartment side of the dash panel. Tighten the nuts to 6.2 Nm (55 in. lbs.) .
  3. If the evaporation canister was repositioned during the removal procedure, reinstall it to its proper position.
  4. Connect the Heater-A/C system vacuum supply line connector to the tee fitting near the heater core tubes.
  5. Unplug or remove the tape from the heater core tubes. Connect the heater hoses to the heater core tubes and fill the engine cooling system.
  6. If the vehicle is not equipped with air conditioning, go to Step 10. If the vehicle is equipped with air conditioning, unplug or remove the tape from the accumulator inlet tube and the evaporator outlet tube fittings. Connect the accumulator inlet tube coupler to the evaporator outlet tube.
  7. Unplug or remove the tape from the liquid line and the evaporator inlet tube fittings. Connect the liquid line coupler to the evaporator inlet tube.
  8. Evacuate the refrigerant system.
  9. Charge the refrigerant system.
  10. Install the instrument panel in the vehicle.
  11. Connect the battery negative cable.
  12. Start the engine and check for proper operation of the heating and air conditioning systems.



Jul 27, 2009 | 2000 Jeep Cherokee

1 Answer

Air conditioning not cooling properly


It sure sounds like a restriction, but you seem to have covered most all the bases I would (I am a ASE Master technician) see if the fixed orifice is plugged or restricted??, maybe the system is freezing up, is the compressor cycling switch set correctly to approx 28-32 psi??

Jul 29, 2008 | 1992 Honda Accord

Not finding what you are looking for?
Cars & Trucks Logo

Related Topics:

1,551 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Chrysler Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

61168 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

21949 Answers

chargerhp
chargerhp

Level 3 Expert

813 Answers

Are you a Chrysler Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...