Question about Chevrolet C1500

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My front brakes are sticking ive changed pads calipers hoses and rotors but can not get the brakes to disengage

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  • fcalvo Nov 05, 2008

    does anyone know where the proportioning valve is?

  • Anonymous Jan 28, 2009

    I have the same problem. I changed the pads and rotors. Then I also cleaned and greased the piston in the caliper. This seems to have fixed the problem

  • Anonymous Mar 12, 2014

    brake caliper sticks

  • Anonymous Mar 19, 2014

    Bleeding brakes but still in coming through

  • Anonymous Mar 20, 2014

    rear caliper might be locked up rear wheel gets stick and wont turn...is that the problem?

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  • 398 Answers

Check out the proportioning valve.

Posted on Aug 02, 2008

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Im having serious issues with my front brake system, especially the drivers side. I own a 1997 Ford Crown Victoria. Ive had to change my rotors and pads twice a year for two years now. I was told in the...


  • If I may suggest that you go and have a second opinion with the caliper in question.
  • You could have a faulty caliper/piston.
  • Sub standard pads and rotors can cause this.
  • Check the entire hose. Sometimes clamps that hold the hose in place along the line can pinch the hose. If someone was negligent when replacing the caliper.
  • Improper or to large of pads could have been installed and they don't move properly on the little metal tracks.
  • There is one other thing that can cause this but it would normally be in all wheels and this is the brake booster. Which is to say the brake booster is a helping hand of sorts because when using pad/rotter there is a great deal more pressure needed than with cylinder/shoe style brakes.

  • That's about everything that could cause this. Good luck to you. I recommend having a second opinion and let them have a look. Seems like the first one is just costing you money.


  • If you have any comments please leave them here and I will respond.
  • Hope this helps and thank you for using FixYa.

Regards, Tony

Aug 14, 2011 | 1997 Ford Crown Victoria

1 Answer

How can I change the rotors and brakes on a 2006 Cadillac?


Front brake
Step 1: Identify Front Disc Brake Components
brake_pads_rotor.jpg
Front Wheel Drive Brake Assembly
Most front disc brake components include: brake rotor, brake pads, brake caliper, caliper mount and brake flex hose. Brake service usual occurs between 20,000 and 40,000 miles depending on driver habits, road conditions and brake pad/ rotor materials used.
Step 2: Remove Brake Caliper to Replace Pads
brake_pad_set.jpg
Removing Brake Caliper Mounting Bolts
Locate primary caliper mounting bolts; apply wrench pressure counter-clockwise (When looking at the head of the bolt) to remove the bolts, upper and lower. Make sure the bolt threads are in good shape and replace if necessary.
Step 3: Remove Front Brake Caliper
remove_brake_caliper.jpg
Remove Front Brake Caliper
After removing the primary caliper mounting bolts lift the brake caliper off of the rotor and then tie or secure to the side, being careful not to bend or kink the brake caliper flex hose. Thoroughly inspect brake caliper and brake hoses for leakage, cracks or chaffing and replace as needed. Next remove the brake pads (If not mounted in the caliper) and secondary caliper mounting bolts. Notice how great protective gloves work, most technicians use them on the job today.
Step 4: Remove Brake Pads
remove_brake_pads.jpg
Remove Front Brake Pads
Once the brake pads have been removed, make sure if there is anti rattle hardware to transfer to the new brake pads. Some brake pad manufacturers will include the proper lube (Caliper slides) and anti-rattle hardware to ensure proper performance of their product.
Step 5: Remove Caliper Mount
remove_brake_pads_holder.jpg
Remove Caliper Mount Bracket
Finish removing secondary caliper mount bolts and remove caliper mount. Note: clean and lube caliper slides and pad friction surfaces of all foreign material or build-up.
Step 6: Remove Brake Rotor
brake_rotor.jpg
Remove Brake Rotor
With the caliper mount out of the way you can now remove the brake rotor. Sometimes it can get stuck so you may need to tap it with a hammer or use penetrating oil to free it up. Some manufacturers use small screws to hold the rotor on as well. Clean and inspect wheel studs, replace if any are damaged. Also clean bearing hub rotor mount surface to ensure the proper mounting of the new brake rotor. Inspect the ABS sensor wheel for cracks or damage and replace as needed.
Step 7: Depressing the Brake Caliper
compress_caliper.jpg
Resetting Brake Caliper
To install the new brake pads you must retract the brake caliper piston. Remove the master cylinder lid or open the brake caliper bleeder screw to allow excess brake fluid to be released if necessary. Install C clamp tool and gently tighten clamp until caliper piston is fully depressed. Note: use old brake pad to protect the caliper piston. Close the bleeders once the piston is retracted completely
Step 8: Installing New Brake Rotor
new_brake_rotor.jpg
Install Brake Rotor
Install new brake rotor, the new rotor is manufactured with a protective film over the rotor to keep it from rusting, remove protective film with brake cleaner before installing; also after the brake job is complete you may experience a small amount of smoke from the rotor when first used. This is normal and will go away after the first couple of uses.
Step 9: Installing New Front Brake Pads
new_brake_pads.jpg
Installing New Brake Pads
Reinstall the front brake caliper mount, and then install front brake pads. Make sure the pads are seated properly in the caliper mount; it must be a close fit to work properly..
Step 10: Reinstall Front Brake Caliper
front_brake_rotor_pads.jpg
Re-Install front Bake Caliper
Reinstall front brake caliper and reinstall caliper-mounting bolts, recheck all mounts and mounting bolts. Check the caliper slides to be sure there is no bind and that the caliper moves freely back and forth on the caliper slides. Bleed brake system per manufacturer's specifications to relieve any air trapped in the system. Before driving the vehicle, push the brake pedal down and let it up slowly, repeat until normal brake pedal operation resumes, this operation is forcing the brake pads to travel to the brake rotors.

Dec 18, 2010 | 2006 Cadillac STS

1 Answer

1996 mazda b3000 rt front brake seems to not disengage enough. i have replaced caliper & brake line.


take the caliper off and check the brake pad slides to make sure the pads arent sticking and dragging. also check the wheel bearing to see if it is bad because it can cause the rotor to set at a slant and rub on the pads.

May 18, 2010 | Mazda B3000 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I have sticking calipers on front brake pads of a 2007 chevrolet silverado pick-up. The pads are new.


you have to replace caliper if its sticking could damage ur rotor as well as strain ur engine because of the locking up

Feb 20, 2010 | 2002 Chevrolet Blazer

1 Answer

All new brake shoes on 97 jeep front callibers still sticking


The problem lays with the Caliper itself and/or the brake hose connected to the Caliper.
However if you replaced the pads, did you also replace the Rotors or have them Turned? The old pads wear the rotor. New pads on old rotors that have not been replaced or turned may end with rubbing or stuck brakes.
A simple way to test whether it's one and/or the other:
1. Remove the Caliper from the rotor, remove the pads. Keep for now the caliper attached to the brake hose.
2. Very slowly push on the brake, exposing more of the piston out of the bore. Not all the way. Usually until the rubber dust seal/boot is fully extended.
3. Check the seal/boot for cracks and tears, and if clean or not. Bad seals may prevent the piston from re-seating.
4. Using a c-clamp and pushing straight in: Try repushing the Caliper Piston back into the Caliper Bore (the cup back into the hole). It should go back in realitively easy.
5. If it doesn't go back in easy: Again slowly pump the brake and re-push the pistons back out to full extended seal/boot (but not the piston out of the bore).
6. Detached the brake hose from the caliper.
7. Again using a c-clamp and pushing straight in: Try again to repush the caliper piston back into the bore without the hose attached. If it goes back-in relatively easy - the caliper is okay...it is the brake hose.
8. If the caliper piston does not go back in easily - Replace the caliper.
9. When Installing the new (reman) caliper, remember to bleed the brakes.
TRY EITHER OR #10 OR #11 BELOW:
After the new Caliper is reattached to hose and has been bled:
10. Again push on the brake petal to fully extend the caliper piston fully (rubber seal/boot fully extended) Again do not push the piston out of the bore! Try pushing the piston back into the bore. If it does not re-seat relatively easy: Replace the brake hose.
11. Another method: After replacing the new caliper back on the rotor: Assumng the entire front end (2WD front wheel drive) or entire vehicle (2WD rear wheel drive) or (4WD all the time) is jacked up off the ground
a. Put the lug nuts back on the rotor.
b. Have helper Start the vehicle and place in Drive. Don't step on gas!
c. Have then let off the brake and then engage the brake.
d. When they let off the brake watch to see if the Rotor is turning or not, if rubbing or not. Or if still sticking.
e. With a new caliper, turned or new rotors, and still a problem? It is the brake hose!
12. Replace the brake hose and try again.

Another method but more expensive:
OR Replace the calipers, brake hoses; bleed and test!

If this helped or not; or if you need additional help or have addtional questions let me know on fixya.com!

Nov 28, 2009 | 1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee

3 Answers

2001 silverado 1500, just put on new pads rotors and 1 new caliper, the brakes are spungy, the wheel with the new caliper is sticking and the front passanger brake too, i cant figure out why.


Replace both front brake hoses.....they collapse on the inside and will not allow fluid to retract...caliper was probobly fine.....this happens a lot....good luck...Lee

Jul 22, 2009 | 2001 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

1 Answer

Rear brakes not completely disengaging


your inside pad wore out first do to a bad caliper or frozen slide or brake hose.remove brake hose off the caliper and see if you can turn the wheel.if you can replace hose and bleed caliper.if wheel still doesn't move buy a loaded caliper,this will come also with new slides!and then bleed

Jan 25, 2009 | 1994 GMC Jimmy

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