Question about Chevrolet Suburban 1500

Open Question

2006 chevrolet suburban 5.3 SFI flex fuel OBD II trouble codes 172 and 175. I have replaced MAF sensor 2 times, New spark plugs, fuel injector cleaner in fuel tank multiple times, replaced drivers side O2 sensor ahead of converter just to see if something would change. I have a scan tool and have reset the computer each time. The service light usually seems to come on with engine warm and during a coasting situation (IE: down hill or during stopping. could this be fuel pressure regulator? Does this vehicle have a fuel filter, if so where is it? I don't want to continue "throwing parts" at it. particularly the 3 remaing O2 sensors at $150 /- each. Any advice or guidance?

Posted by on

  • gregnesbitt Mar 02, 2009

    2004 Chev Suburban 5.3 Flex Fuel, Fuel Pump Running, Change Fuel Filter, Now have no PSI to Fuel rail. Truck will not start.

×

6 Suggested Answers

  • 81 Answers

SOURCE: cylinder 3 misfire

Make sure you're using the recommended spark plugs. When my car did that, I had put Bosch Platinum Plus-4 plugs in and got that same problem. Turns out the plugs are too hot and cause it to fire prematurely and kick the misfire code.

Posted on Jul 24, 2008

Scorpedo
  • 111 Answers

SOURCE: 04 kia sorento runs poorly

Might be going super simple here but from what you have said have you checked the wiring on your sensors? If you know that one works and you swap it and its not working its very possible the wires farther up are shorted or burned somewhere.

Posted on Dec 12, 2008

  • 43 Answers

SOURCE: service engine soon light on 2002 chevrolet tahoe stays on

That normally means that you have a issue with your gas cap try replacing your gas cap first then diconnect the negative terminal of the battery for about three minutes to clear the memory and start the truck again

Posted on Apr 11, 2009

wireguy212
  • 1627 Answers

SOURCE: how do i fix my 2001 cadillac catera idle problem

The problems you are describing indicate to me that you likely need to replace the coil pack that runs from the spark plugs ,and the plug wires end up at it.It also may be the spark plug wires,get a water bottle and spray the wires after dark and if you get a light show from them then replace them,if not,replace the coil pack.

Posted on Jul 15, 2010

dgmcwilliams
  • 89 Answers

SOURCE: Ù?دي Ù?Ø´Ù?Ù?Ø© في عÙ?Ù?ية اÙ?دÙ?را

Cannot read you issue, please retype it and resubmit--thanks.

Posted on Oct 04, 2010

ZJLimited
  • 17970 Answers

SOURCE: FORD F150 4.6 L Engine

Several thnigs to check there; review all informastion disponible to do it and solve this...

P0356
- Ignition Coil F Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction
The ignition signal from the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) or Electronic Control Module(ECM) is sent to and amplified by the power transistor. The power transistor turns ON and OFF the ignition coil primary circuit. This ON/OFF operation induces the proper high voltage in the coil secondary circuit.

Symptoms
- Engine Light ON (or Service Engine Soon Warning Light)
- Lack/Loss of Power
- The engine may be harder to start
- Engine hesitation

Possible Causes:
- Open or short in the ignition coil circuit
- Ignition coil circuit shorted to ground
- Ignition coil connector
- Damaged ignition coil
- Damaged PCM or ECM

Possible Solution:
- If damage, repair ignition coil circuit
- Replaced ignition coil
- Replaced PCM or ECM
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

P0152 - O2 Sensor Circuit High Voltage (Bank 2 Sensor 1)
The heated oxygen sensor 1 is placed into the exhaust manifold. It detects the amount of oxygen in the exhaust gas compared to the outside air. The heated oxygen sensor 1 has a closed-end tube made of ceramic zirconia. The zirconia generates voltage from approximately 1V in richer conditions to 0V in leaner conditions. The heated oxygen sensor 1 signal is sent to the ECM. The ECM adjusts the injection pulse duration to achieve the ideal air-fuel ratio. The ideal air-fuel ratio occurs near the radical change from 1V to 0V.

Symptoms:
- Engine Light ON (or Service Engine Soon Warning Light)
- High Fuel Consumption
- Excessive Smoke from Exhaust

Possible Causes:
- Harness or connectors (The heated oxygen sensor 1 heater circuit is open or shorted.)
- Front Heater oxygen sensor heater (Bank 2) may be faulty

Possible Solution:
Replacing the O2 Sensor 1 usually takes care of the problem
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

P0174 - Fuel Injection System Too Lean Bank 2
With the Air/Fuel Mixture Ratio Self-Learning Control, the actual mixture ratio can be brought closely to the theoretical mixture ratio based on the mixture ratio feedback signal from the heated oxygen sensors 1. The ECM calculates the necessary compensation to correct the offset between the actual and the theoretical ratios.

In case the amount of the compensation value is extremely large (The actual mixture ratio is too lean.), the ECM judges the condition as the fuel injection system malfunction and light up the MIL (2 trip detection logic).

Symptoms:
- Engine Light ON (or Service Engine Soon Warning Light)
- Excessive Fuel Consumption

Possible Causes:
- Intake air leaks
- Front Heated oxygen sensor may be faulty
- Injectors may be faulty
- Exhaust gas leaks
- Incorrect fuel pressure
- Lack of fuel
- Mass air flow sensor may be faulty
- Incorrect PCV hose connection

Possible Solution:
Dirty air filter of faulty air flow sensor are common causes of the problem.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

P2197 - DODGE - Sys Too Rich at Hier Load Bank1
Means that the O2 sensors on each bank are seeing WAY too much oxygen in the exhaust gas. In normal operation the signal from the O2 sensors should swing back and forth between rich and lean. Your sensors are locked on lean.

Those codes are the same as P0174 (and P0171). Sounds like you have a vacuum leak somewhere. Most common place is the PCV elbow where it connects to the throttle body adapter.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Hope this helps; keep in touch.

Posted on Dec 30, 2010

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

Car sputtering badly. Codes P303 n P102 show on diagnostics and have replaced both parts associated with these codes,PLUS, new fuel filter, engine still sputtering badly.


Hi,

I hope I can help with this. This could mean the engine spark plugs or plug is the issue. Also check the exhaust pipe. White smoke indicates a coolant issue. Check your coolant reservoir. Black smoke indicates a Fuel issue. Blue is an oil issue. Also, speaking of your spark plugs there very well could be a misfire.

the code P303 could be cylinder 3 misfire
P102 the mass air flow sensor which is on the air filter cover. It's an electrical part and is sensor. Please check these and let me know.

Jul 28, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Error code PO171 Mechanic said i need to replace bank One Sensor 2. 89467-42010, 89465-42090, 89467-42020, 89465-42100. Which one do I have to replace?


following answer courtesy of OBD-CODES.com OBD Codes Your OBD-II Trouble Codes Repair Site Home Trouble Codes FAQs Forums Store P0171 OBD-II Trouble Code Technical Description System Too Lean (Bank 1) What does that mean? Basically this means that an oxygen sensor in bank 1 has detected a lean condition (too much oxygen in the exhaust). On V6/V8/V10 engines, Bank 1 is the side of the engine that has cylinder #1. The P0171 is one of the more common trouble codes. This code is triggered by the first downstream (front) O2 sensor. The sensor provides a reading of the air:fuel ratio leaving the engine's cylinders, and the vehicles powertrain/engine control module (PCM/ECM) uses that reading and adjusts to keep the engine running at that optimum ratio of 14.7:1. If something is not right and the PCM cannot maintain the 14.7:1 ratio, but rather there is too much air, it triggers this code. You'll want to also read our article on short and long term fuel trims to help understand the operation of the engine. Note: This DTC is very similar to P0174, and in fact your vehicle may show both codes at the same time. This diagnostic trouble code (DTC) is a generic OBD-II powertrain code. It is considered generic because it applies to all makes and models of vehicles (1996-newer), although specific repair steps may vary depending on the model. Symptoms You will more than likely not notice any drivability problems, although there may be symptoms such as: a lack of power detonation (spark knock) rough idle hesitation/surge on acceleration. Causes A code P0171 may mean that one or more of the following has happened: The MAF (Mass Air Flow) Sensor is dirty or faulty Note: The use of "oiled" air filters may cause the MAF to become dirty if the filter is over-oiled. There is also an issue with some vehicles where the MAF sensors leak the silicone potting material used to protect the circuitry. There could be a vacuum leak downstream of the MAF sensor Possible cracked vacuum or PCV line/connection Faulty or stuck open PCV valve Failed or faulty oxygen sensor (bank 1, sensor 1) Sticking/plugged or failed fuel injector Low fuel pressure (possible plugged/dirty fuel filter!) Exhaust leak between engine and first oxygen sensor Possible Solutions A lot of times, cleaning the MAF sensor and finding/fixing vacuum leaks fix the problem. If you're on a tight budget, start there, but that may not be the fix for certain. So, possible solutions include: Clean the MAF sensor. Consult your service manual for it's location if you need help. I find it's best to take it off and spray it with electronics cleaner or brake cleaner. Make sure you are careful not to damage the MAF sensor, and make sure it's dry before reinstalling Inspect all vacuum and PCV hoses, replace/repair as required Inspect all hoses and connections in the air intake system Inspect and/or test the intake manifold gaskets for leakage Check for a dirty fuel filter and proper fuel pressure Ideally you'll want to monitor short and long term fuel trims using an advanced scan tool If you have access, you may want to run a smoke test

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0171
Copyright OBD-Codes.com
OBD II Trouble Codes Home

Aug 02, 2015 | 2002 Toyota RAV4

1 Answer

Im getting a po191, po171 ans p2197 on my 2006 f250 super duty.


P0171 OBD-II Trouble Code Technical Description System Too Lean (Bank 1) What does that mean? Basically this means that an oxygen sensor in bank 1 has detected a lean condition (too much oxygen in the exhaust). On V6/V8/V10 engines, Bank 1 is the side of the engine that has cylinder #1. The P0171 is one of the more common trouble codes. This code is triggered by the first downstream (front) O2 sensor. The sensor provides a reading of the air:fuel ratio leaving the engine's cylinders, and the vehicles powertrain/engine control module (PCM/ECM) uses that reading and adjusts to keep the engine running at that optimum ratio of 14.7:1. If something is not right and the PCM cannot maintain the 14.7:1 ratio, but rather there is too much air, it triggers this code. You'll want to also read our article on short and long term fuel trims to help understand the operation of the engine. Note: This DTC is very similar to P0174, and in fact your vehicle may show both codes at the same time. This diagnostic trouble code (DTC) is a generic OBD-II powertrain code. It is considered generic because it applies to all makes and models of vehicles (1996-newer), although specific repair steps may vary depending on the model. Symptoms You will more than likely not notice any drivability problems, although there may be symptoms such as: a lack of power detonation (spark knock) rough idle hesitation/surge on acceleration. Causes A code P0171 may mean that one or more of the following has happened: The MAF (Mass Air Flow) Sensor is dirty or faulty Note: The use of "oiled" air filters may cause the MAF to become dirty if the filter is over-oiled. There is also an issue with some vehicles where the MAF sensors leak the silicone potting material used to protect the circuitry. There could be a vacuum leak downstream of the MAF sensor Possible cracked vacuum or PCV line/connection Faulty or stuck open PCV valve Failed or faulty oxygen sensor (bank 1, sensor 1) Sticking/plugged or failed fuel injector Low fuel pressure (possible plugged/dirty fuel filter!) Exhaust leak between engine and first oxygen sensor Possible Solutions A lot of times, cleaning the MAF sensor and finding/fixing vacuum leaks fix the problem. If you're on a tight budget, start there, but that may not be the fix for certain. So, possible solutions include: Clean the MAF sensor. Consult your service manual for it's location if you need help. I find it's best to take it off and spray it with electronics cleaner or brake cleaner. Make sure you are careful not to damage the MAF sensor, and make sure it's dry before reinstalling Inspect all vacuum and PCV hoses, replace/repair as required Inspect all hoses and connections in the air intake system Inspect and/or test the intake manifold gaskets for leakage Check for a dirty fuel filter and proper fuel pressure Ideally you'll want to monitor short and long term fuel trims using an advanced scan tool If you have access, you may want to run a smoke test

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0171
Copyright © OBD-Codes.com

P0191 Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor Circuit Range/Performance

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/
Copyright © OBD-Codes.com

P2197 O2 Sensor Signal Biased/Stuck Lean (Bank 2 Sensor 1) Code OBD-II Trouble Code Technical Description O2 A/F Sensor Signal Biased/Stuck Lean (Bank 2 Sensor 1) What does that mean? This code is a generic powertrain code. It is considered generic because it applies to all makes and models of vehicles (1996-newer), although specific repair steps may be slightly different depending on the model. On some vehicles, such as Toyotas, this is actually referring to A/F sensors, Air/Fuel ratio sensors. Which are basically more sensitive versions of oxygen sensors. The powertrain control module (PCM) monitors the air/fuel ratio of the exhaust using oxygen (O2) sensors, and tries to keep things at the normal air/fuel ratio of 14.7:1 via the fuel system. The oxygen A/F sensor outputs a voltage reading that the PCM uses. This DTC is set when the air/fuel ratio as read by the PCM is lean (too much oxygen in the mixture) and has strayed so far from 14.7:1 that the PCM can no longer correct it. This code specifically refers to the sensor between the engine and catalytic converter (not the one behind it). Bank #2 is the side of the engine that does not contain cylinder #1. Note: This DTC is very similar to P2195, P2196, P2198. If you have multiple DTC codes, always fix them in the order they appear. Symptoms For this DTC, the malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) will illuminate. There may be other symtoms. Causes Potential causes of a P2197 code include: Oxygen (O2) or A/F ratio sensor or sensor heater malfunction Open or short in O2 sensor circuit (wiring, harness) Fuel pressure or fuel injector problem Faulty PCM Intake air or engine vacuum leaks Faulty fuel injector(s) Fuel pressure too high or too low PCV system leak/fault A/F sensor relay faulty MAF sensor malfunction ECT sensor malfunction Fuel pressure too low Fuel leak Air suction in air intake system Diagnostic Steps & Possible Solutions Use a scan tool to get readings from the sensor, and monitor the short and long term fuel trim values and O2 sensor or Air Fuel Ratio sensor readings. Also, look at the freeze frame data to see the conditions at the time the code was set. That should help determine if the O2 AF sensor is operating correctly. Compare with manufacturers values. If you don't have access to a scan tool, you could use a multimeter and back-probe the terminals on the O2 sensor wiring connector. Check for shorts to ground, short to power, open circuits, etc. Compare specs with manufacturers specifications. Visually inspect the wiring & connectors leading to the sensor, check for loose connectors, wires rubbed/chaffed, melted wires, etc. Repair as necessary. Visually inspect vacuum lines. You can also test for vacuum leaks using propane or carburetor cleaner along the hoses while the engine is running, if the RPMs change you likely found the leak. Be very careful if doing that, and have a fire extinguisher within reach in case something goes wrong. For example, on a bunch of Ford vehicles, the hose that goes from the PCV to the throttle body can melt causing P2195, P2197, P0171, and/or P0174 codes. If a vacuum leak is determined to be the problem, it would be prudent to replace all vacuum lines if they are getting older, becoming brittle, etc. Use a digital volt ohm meter (DVOM) to check other sensors mentioned such as MAF, IAT, for proper operation. Perform a fuel pressure test, verify readings against manufacturers specification. If you're on a budget and you only have an engine with more than one bank and the problem is only with one bank, you could swap the sensor from one bank to the other, clear the code, and see if the code is followed to the other bank. That would tell you it is the sensor/heater itself that's failed. Check for outstanding technical service bulletins (TSB) for your vehicle, in some cases the PCM can be recalibrated to fix this (not a common fix though). TSBs could also call for replacement of the sensor. When replacing oxygen / AF sensors, be sure to use a high quality ones. In many cases non-OEM sensors are of lesser quality and will not perform correctly. We strongly recommend you stick with OEM brand replacements.

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p2197
Copyright © OBD-Codes.com

May 09, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

What does Po-171 code mean?


P0171 OBD-II Trouble Code Technical Description System Too Lean (Bank 1) What does that mean? Basically this means that an oxygen sensor in bank 1 has detected a lean condition (too much oxygen in the exhaust). On V6/V8/V10 engines, Bank 1 is the side of the engine that has cylinder #1. The P0171 is one of the more common trouble codes. This code is triggered by the first downstream (front) O2 sensor. The sensor provides a reading of the air:fuel ratio leaving the engine's cylinders, and the vehicles powertrain/engine control module (PCM/ECM) uses that reading and adjusts to keep the engine running at that optimum ratio of 14.7:1. If something is not right and the PCM cannot maintain the 14.7:1 ratio, but rather there is too much air, it triggers this code. You'll want to also read our article on short and long term fuel trims to help understand the operation of the engine. Note: This DTC is very similar to P0174, and in fact your vehicle may show both codes at the same time. This diagnostic trouble code (DTC) is a generic OBD-II powertrain code. It is considered generic because it applies to all makes and models of vehicles (1996-newer), although specific repair steps may vary depending on the model. Symptoms You will more than likely not notice any drivability problems, although there may be symptoms such as: a lack of power detonation (spark knock) rough idle hesitation/surge on acceleration. Causes A code P0171 may mean that one or more of the following has happened: The MAF (Mass Air Flow) Sensor is dirty or faulty Note: The use of "oiled" air filters may cause the MAF to become dirty if the filter is over-oiled. There is also an issue with some vehicles where the MAF sensors leak the silicone potting material used to protect the circuitry. There could be a vacuum leak downstream of the MAF sensor Possible cracked vacuum or PCV line/connection Faulty or stuck open PCV valve Failed or faulty oxygen sensor (bank 1, sensor 1) Sticking/plugged or failed fuel injector Low fuel pressure (possible plugged/dirty fuel filter!) Exhaust leak between engine and first oxygen sensor Possible Solutions A lot of times, cleaning the MAF sensor and finding/fixing vacuum leaks fix the problem. If you're on a tight budget, start there, but that may not be the fix for certain. So, possible solutions include: Clean the MAF sensor. Consult your service manual for it's location if you need help. I find it's best to take it off and spray it with electronics cleaner or brake cleaner. Make sure you are careful not to damage the MAF sensor, and make sure it's dry before reinstalling Inspect all vacuum and PCV hoses, replace/repair as required Inspect all hoses and connections in the air intake system Inspect and/or test the intake manifold gaskets for leakage Check for a dirty fuel filter and proper fuel pressure Ideally you'll want to monitor short and long term fuel trims using an advanced scan tool If you have access, you may want to run a smoke test

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0171
Copyright © OBD-Codes.com

Apr 21, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

Code p0171 and p0174


P0171 possible cheap fix

Feb 21, 2015 | 2002 GMC Sierra 1500

1 Answer

I have a 2005 Ford Taurus SE (Flex Fuel), 3.0L, OHV. I recently had my A/C compressor replaced due to a clutch disc failure. The new compressor/clutch works great, engages/disengages properly, and blows...


Improve the FixYa experience for everyone by voting. I want you to let me know if the solution(s) suggested were of any value. Constructive criticism is welcomed.

Hi,

I'm Ben and -- hopefully -- I can provide some meaningful assistance.

In my opinion, the problem lies with you P0174 reading. I'll explain.

OBD II Fault Code

OBD II P0171
OBD II P0174

Fault Code Definition

OBD II P0171 Fuel System Too Lean (Bank 1)
OBD II P0174 Fuel System Too Lean (Bank 2)

Symptoms

  1. Check Engine Light will illuminate
  2. In some cases, no adverse conditions may be noticed by the driver
  3. In other cases, there may be performance problems, such as a lack of power on acceleration and some "coughing" or misfiring
  4. The vehicle may have trouble idling, especially when warm or when sitting at a stoplight

Common Problems That Trigger the P0171 and P0174 Code

  • PCM software needs to be updated
  • Vacuum leaks (Intake Manifold Gaskets, vacuum hoses, PCV hoses, etc.)
  • Mass Airflow Sensor (MAF)
  • Plugged Fuel Filter or weak Fuel Pump
  • Plugged or dirty Fuel Injectors

Jun 23, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

I had my car inspected and received P0420 code? what does it mean?


P0420 Error Code: Catalyst System Efficiency Below Threshold (Bank 1) Repair information for the OBD-II trouble code P0420 - Catalyst System Efficiency Below Threshold (Bank 1)
www.obd-codes.com/p0420

Feb 18, 2010 | 2000 Toyota Celica

2 Answers

Codes P0440 and P0300


Hi,

A quick Internet search on those codes pulled up the following info.
http://www.obd-codes.com/p0440
  • Remove and reinstall the gas cap, clear the code, and drive for a day and see if the codes come back.
  • Inspect the EVAP system for cuts/holes in tubes/hoses
  • Inspect for damaged or disconnected hoses around the Evap purge solenoid
  • Check and/or replace the sensor
  • Check and/or replace the purge valve
  • Have a professional use a smoke machine to detect leaks
http://www.obd-codes.com/p0300
  • Faulty spark plugs or wires
  • Faulty coil (pack)
  • Faulty oxygen sensor(s)
  • Faulty fuel injector(s)
  • Burned exhaust valve
  • Faulty catalytic converter(s)
  • Stuck/blocked EGR valve / passages
  • Faulty camshaft position sensor
  • Defective computer

Dec 12, 2008 | 1999 Chevrolet Cavalier

Not finding what you are looking for?
Cars & Trucks Logo

Related Topics:

434 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Chevrolet Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

61249 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

21949 Answers

Jeff Turcotte
Jeff Turcotte

Level 3 Expert

6812 Answers

Are you a Chevrolet Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...