Question about 2001 Pontiac Grand Am SE

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Engine overheating and radiator fan does not come on even when the air condition is on.

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  • nillalolly Aug 08, 2008

    where is the temperature sensor to the computer on a 2000 grand prix? already changed all relays, bth fuses, coolant temperature sensor. straight wired the fan and it works and the computer is ok. please help!!

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Replace the Temperature sensor that goes to the computer, this vehicle has two on it, one for hte computer and one for the guage on the dash. Also check for a temperature switch, if this vehicle has one, that could have gone out as well. The easiest thing to check and replace would be the fan relay. If none of these are the problem, the computer has gone bad

Posted on Aug 05, 2008

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Hello... I got problem with my honda odyssey. For the past 3 days, if i start the engine, after 5 min the temperature will goes up to HOT and engine indicator light-up. I turn-off the engine and then start...


Your English is very good.

From what you have described, which is a rapid over heating of the radiator coolant fluid and therefore a hot engine condition, it would appear that the thermostat in the engine's cooling system is faulty.

If the thermostat is sticking in the closed or nearly closed position temporarily, there will be no flow or very little coolant flow between the engine and the radiator and the engine will overheat.

You have advised that after the engine is shut off , and radiator coolant fluid has cooled, you re-start the engine and drive the car without the overheating condition occurring again and the radiator coolant temperature is normal. This time there is no overheating because the thermostat is working normally.

You should have the thermostat replaced as soon as possible because allowing the engine to overheat can cause very expensive engine damage.

If you had a continuing overheating condition then I would suspect both the thermostat and the water pump. However as the overheating seems to be only temporary, and clears itself after you have shut down the engine and re-started it 10 minutes later (without further overheating arising) then I think you only have a faulty thermostat.

Please also check that the electric fans which draw air through the radiator are operating. These run on a temperature sensor and will switch on automatically once the radiator coolant fluid reaches a certain temperature and then switch off again when the fluid temperature reduces. You will hear them running once they start up. If these fans are not working the radiator coolant can quickly overheat in various driving and temperature conditions because there will be insufficient air flow through the radiator to cool the fluid. If the temperature sensor is faulty or has died, or if the electric motors running the fans are faulty, the fans will not operate.

I hope this helps.

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I would check to see if the cooling fan is coming on. Could be a bad fan switch. When the air is turned on, it turns on the cooling fan regardless of engine temp.

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To properly diagnose your overheating problem we need to rule out some things.
First: Is there enough coolant/antifreeze in the radiator? Don't just look inside the plastic overflow bottle, but remove the radiator cap (when the engine is cold) and look inside the radiator. You should be able to physically see the fluid level if it is at its proper level. Most cars and trucks will hold 1 1/2-2 gallons of coolant and water mixture. If you have to add more than a pint of fluid you should have the cooling system pressure tested for a leak. If you see any obvious fluid loss on the ground or in the engine compartment, you should also have the system tested for leaks.
Second: If no coolant leak or low fluid level is present, then determine when the overheating complaint occurs.
If the engine overheats while at a stop or idle only:
Most front wheel drive cars use an electric cooling fan motor located in front or behind the radiator. The function of the cooling fan is to improve airflow across the radiator at stops and low speeds. The fan is controlled by sensors that regulate the engine temperature and additional load that might be placed on the engine.
The air conditioning compressor will require the cooling fan to operate at idle as long as the compressor is on. A quick way to check the cooling fan operation is to turn on the air conditioner. The cooling fan should come on with the air conditioner compressor. Some cars will have two electric fans, one is for the radiator and the other is the air conditioner condenser fan. Usually the radiator fan is closer to the middle of the radiator. The radiator fan is responsible for engine cooling, and the condenser fan is responsible for increasing air conditioning efficiency at idle and low speed.
If your vehicle does not have an electric cooling fan on the radiator it will have a belt driven fan blade and fan clutch. This fan should be pulling a large amount of warm to hot air across the radiator onto the engine. What you want to determine with either fan situation is that there is ample airflow across the radiator at idle. The radiator is the primary heat exchange for the engine, and airflow is crucial.
What if the engine overheats while at high speeds on the freeway?
Again, airflow and coolant circulation are crucial. At 55 MPH we can assume you have ample airflow across the radiator, so proper antifreeze circulation is the thing to inspect. I compare overheating at 55MPH to jogging with a sock in your mouth. The faster and longer you jog, the more air you are going to require, and with a sock in your mouth you are going to have to breath extra hard to maintain the proper amount of air to keep you going. At 55MPH the water pump is pumping a large amount of hot antifreeze throughout the cooling system.
If there is a restriction in the system like a kinked radiator hose, a restricted radiator, or a stuck thermostat, it will produce the same affect as the sock in the mouth scenario. Rust and water calcification can accumulate in the radiator and drastically reduce the flow of coolant at high speeds. Removing the radiator from the vehicle for disassembly and cleaning or radiator replacement are the only two real cures for a clogged radiator.
Using a can of "radiator flush" additive might help as preventive maintenance, but will probably just be a waste of time and money trying to correct a restricted radiator.

Hope this helps, best regards.

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1 Answer

Mechanic went to change out the thermostat on the 03 Cruiser...drove it back to me..overheated when he got it back...removed the thermostat to see if that would at suppress the overheat problem until the...


Removal of the thermostat from the cooling system is not a good idea. This upsets the coolant flow rate in the system, and that can cause the engine to overheat, even when no other problem with the cooling system exists.

Try to identify the cause of the overheating.

Ensure that engine tune, or other engine mechanical fault condition is not the cause of the overheating, then go through the checklist following:-

1) Check engine cooling fan/s are operating as required when engine temp rises above cut-in threshold - check fan control relay is ok,
2) Check for collapsing radiator hose on suction side of water-pump when motor revs raised above idle.
3) Check coolant reservoir pressure cap is serviceable,
4) Check coolant system is properly filled - carry out any bleed off procedure specified to clear any air locks- (ensure heater core coolant flow is turned on).
5) Check for combustion gas bubbles in the coolant reservoir while the motor is running - this indicates a blown head gasket. If in doubt, take it to a radiator shop and ask for a combustion gas check on your radiator.
6) Check condition of radiator core:-
i) for blockage of air flow to (bugs/grass etc),
ii) for core internal blockage to coolant flow,

If all above ok, replace the thermostat again (also ensure it is not installed upside down) - faulty new thermostats are not unheard of.

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1 Answer

Radiator fan


You should check the 30 amp "RDI" fuse and the 7.5 ECU-IG fuse. Both fuses are critical to the operation of the fan system. The RDI fuse sends power to the fan #1 relay. The A/C amplifier turns on power to the fan #1 relay, this is why your fan works on A/C.

Now, with no cooling fan under "normal conditions" (A/C off), you need to have a good fan #2 relay, and a good water temp switch. This switch is on the engine, near the thermostat housing (I think); with a single plug, with a white with a blue trace wire going to it. Remove this wire from the sender, and jump it to ground (anywhere on the metal of the engine) with the key on (engine OFF). If the fan starts, you need a new water temp sending unit. If not, then consider a new fan #2 relay. This system is pretty simple.

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