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A full vacuum line diagram and a diagram showing how it works with the turbo boosted system and with the fuel air and exhaust

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6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: my turbo won't boost its starts to shake and pull back

when i try and speed up my car will boost up a 1000 rpm and then jump down 500, and that be a leak or something, i was looking and a hose going into my turbo cooler had some condensation on it and dirt but the other one seems to be fine

Posted on Oct 18, 2009

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SOURCE: looking for 1995 volvo 850 turbo vacuum line schematic diagram

This is for a 98 T5, but it should be close enough. http://www.matthewsvolvosite.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=93956#p93956

Posted on Oct 20, 2009

ZJLimited
  • 17970 Answers

SOURCE: is there a diagram that shows how the vacuum lines hook

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Vacuum hose routing-1989 2.5L California Turbo I engine


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Vacuum hose routing-1990-91 2.2L and 2.5L Federal engines with manual transaxles, and 2.2L and 2.5L Canadian and California engines


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Vacuum hose routing-1990-91 2.5L Turbo I California engines


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Vacuum hose routing-1990-91 2.5L Turbo I Federal and Canadian engines

Hope helped with this information (remember rated this help) Good luck.

Posted on Nov 10, 2009

daves944
  • 1050 Answers

SOURCE: i have a saab 93

This really sounds like your running out of fuel. an engine will back-fire as it goes lean. I would start by replacing the fuel filter, it's just maintenance anyways, and if that doesn't solve your problem you may have a bad fuel pump. It would be a good idea to have the fuel pressure checked under load before replacing it though as they are expensive. I would hook up a fuel pressure gauge and tape it to the front window while driving. If you can't do this, see if you can find a shop that will. They won't like taking instructions from you, but this is an important test to determine if the pump can prvide the volume the engine needs while under boost. The fuel pressure should be 28psi at idle and should rise to 42 psi under boost. If it can't sustain 42 psi under boost, you have a bad fuel pump.

Hope this helps,
Dave

Posted on Mar 03, 2010

  • 9 Answers

SOURCE: Peugeot 206 diesel starting problem! help!!!

check heater relay,ecu,glow plugs,maybe air going back into the tank,goodluck

Posted on Mar 19, 2010

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Hi mate I have got nissan 200 sx .2001 turbo of my car has stopped working .someone told me there is a leakage in turbo .is it can be fixed .please let me know


Turbo's do not leak as such but hoses connected to it do so check all hose connections and the intercooler for air leaks/cracks in seams /welds . If there is an oil seal leaking it will show up as blue smoke in the exhaust. There is an actuator that varies the turbine vanes to give more boost at low rpm's and this is actuated by a sensor and a rubber hose connected to the vacuum . If the vanes are stuck or the rubber hose is cracked /broken then you will have a vacuum leak and low/no boost at low revs.

Aug 26, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Peugeot 807


Have you checked the PCV system?? If its stuck in the closed position then you will lack power and turbo boost. A vehicle needs 3 things to make it run proper; FUEL,FIRE and AIR. Try that and see if it helps.

Jan 01, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Tubro was making 40lbs of boost, now only 20 what's going on


turbos generate boost fro the heat in the exhaust and the free flow of exhaust gases. That means the amount of fuel through the injectors and blocked cat converter or exhaust system. OK now you know how the boost is generated look for areas that will loose the pressure (boost ) between the turbo and the manifold Look for loose boost hose clamps on the turbo and intercooler and intercooler and manifold. Look for cracks or holes in intercooler. Look for blocked air cleaner as turbos use more air through the air cleaner than normal. Finally look at the compressor blade of the turbo as any bent fin will slow down the turbo wheel giving less boost. Have the turbo tested for correct operation

May 10, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have an Audi A41.9 TDI 1997 and it is coughing up black smoke which comes out of the exhaust pipe. On the motoway, while trying to overtake a car a puff of black smoke came out of the exhaust pipe and...


There are several possible faults:
1. Pressure sensor is faulty (it might come up on diagnostics as if it was working fine, but it shows the wrong manifold pressure).
2. Either one of the boost pipes/hoses or the intercooler have a hole somewhere.
3. Turbo's actuator is stuck.
4. Vacuum hose is damaged which goes in to the turbo actuator.
5. Control valve for the turbo actuator is not working properly.

May 16, 2017 | Audi A4 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I HAVE A 2007 DODGE SPRINTER WITH CODE PO299 WHAT TEST CAN I DO


Check all hoses to and from turbo to intake .. it is most likely a leak somewhere and the pcm is reading it as a underboost code.

Jul 28, 2010 | 2004 Dodge Sprinter

1 Answer

Turbo problem...dealer replaced valve...still


If you have a problem that isn't caused by something obvious, you need a Ross tech VCDS cable. This is a laptop computer diagnostic cable to talk to the car's computer. Without it you cannot do the more advanced tests.
Note about generations - some generations have similar engines: Mk3= 1996-1997 3rd generation Passat TDI or 1996-1999 3rd gen Jetta TDI Mk4= 1998-2006 New Beetle, 1999-2005 Jetta, 1999-2006 Golf, 2004-2005 Passat TDI Mk5= 2005.5-2010 Jetta TDI Mk6= 2010+ Golf TDI
Remember, an engine needs fuel, air, and compression to run. Low power is related to a lack of one of these or a sensor problem making the computer thinking there's a lack of these. Any sensor problem could also be caused by a bad ground or broken/chaffed wire so also check every section of the wiring of the suspect sensor for breaks.
Bad MAF sensor - very likely cause on the mk4 TDI. Not common on the mk3 TDI (1996-1999 Jetta/Passat). Early mk4 MAFs failed often.Error codes normally do not show up with a faulty MAF since the signal degrades instead of going out completely. Through VCDS, checking MAF actual vs. specified at idle, high rpm, and high load will quickly show a bad MAF or other problem causing a low MAF reading.
Clogged intake manifold - carbon buildup chokes the intake manifold, starving the engine of air. Only ultra low sulfur diesel is sold in North America now so there should be much less buildup in the future. Always use good quality synthetic engine oil on your TDI..
Anti shudder valve shut or almost shut (does not apply to mk3 TDI, more for mk4 TDI) - there is a spring loaded valve right before the intake manifold. Newer TDI use an electronic valve and are not as susceptible to sticking. If there is excess carbon buildup, it could shut in a partially closed position.
Clogged snowscreen/air filter - a clogged air filter will starve the engine of air. A clogged snowscreen (large debris air pre-filter) shouldn't block off all air unless the aux-intake flap is also clogged.
Clogged fuel filter - change interval is 20,000 miles but biodiesel use (cleans out old buildup) or bad fuel could clog it early, resulting in fuel starvation. Algae or bacterial growth in the fuel tank could also clog the lines.
Boost leak - a cracked hose or loose connector lets measured air out. No air or major leaks = poor engine running or stuttering. A visual inspection may not reveal all the possible or hard to see spots where leaks can form.
Hose inside ECU (mk3 TDI only, does not apply to mk4 or newer TDI) - this hose leaks and normally sets a check engine light,
Vacuum lines to/from turbo and n75 solenoid - these dry out over time and crack or can rub through. It's possible they are clogged. The n75 solenoid controls the turbo wastegate or VNT vanes with either vacuum or pressure. b4 Passat - on firewall above coolant reservoir, a3 Jetta - on pass side near air box, a4 Jetta/Golf - on firewall above brake fluid reservoir.
Problem with the n75 solenoid, VNT actuator, VNT vanes, or vacuum lines. You should have already checked the vacuum lines, the below test will inspect the entire system. Start the engine and through VCDS, click on "engine"-->"measuring blocks"-->hit "up" until you reach "group 11". Compare Specified vs. Actual MAP. This compares what's actually happening and being observed from the boost sensor (barring a faulty sensor/plug/wire) to boost the computer is requesting (what should be happening). They should be relatively close. If they are far off this normally results in limp mode but it could also be contributing to the problem. If you have a mk3 you have a conventional turbo but you can still use this test to check the n75 solenoid, the wastegate, and vac lines. However, wastegates are much less susceptible to sticking vs. VNT vanes. The videos below show how it works. The lever on the outside is welded to a lever inside the turbo housing. This is how it moves the VNT vanes. See the below videos to see how smoothly and free the lever should move. It should not stick or bind at all. Vacuum is being applied to the can, not pressure.
If the test shows poor response or no response at all, it could be sticky VNT vanes/actuator (mk4 and newer TDI only), The vanes or actuator can stick or fail to function, the lever should move freely.
If the actuator is fine, also check the n75 solenoid and vac lines. The n75 solenoid controls vacuum or boost to the vacuum line going to the turbo wastegate/VNT actuator. To test, apply voltage to the solenoid or swap with a known good unit. If you have a mk4 TDI, you can swap it with the EGR solenoid to test. Also check the plug for corrosion and the wiring harness for chaffing. If those are good, disconnect the VNT actuator rod and move the vanes by hand. If the vanes are stuck then remove the turbo and clean the inside of the exhaust housing to free the stuck vanes.
Faulty injection pump's fuel injection quantity adjuster - these are occasionally set wrong from the factory or after seal replacement. It's also possible the fuel pump's internal quantity adjuster is faulty. Applies to 1996-2003 TDI only or TDI that use a Bosch VE injection pump (not pumpe duse or common rail). Injection quantity should be 3-5 at idle and up to 36-38 at full throttle.




Feb 01, 2010 | 2004 Volkswagen Jetta

1 Answer

97 legacy no boost


The second turbo simply follows the first when the system activates it by bringing it in parallel with the first. The first turbo is only designed for a 1200cc motor so it can not deliver enough compressed air at revs for a bigger motor so they arrange to bring in a second turbo of the same size when the first one runs out of puff.
The first turbo is a semi-mechanical device. The ecm raises the boost level at which it operates but it should be producing some boost regardless.
So concentrate on the first turbo.
Isolate it from the ecm control system
(There is a misleading tip on youtube involving pulling hoses but it is misguided, the comment is ignorant, and I do not recommend it)
Instead, as per the manual, on the first turbo remove the system pressure lines from exhaust and wastegate. Loop a short piece of vacuum hose from the primary turbo output to its own wastegate.
Blank off the system hoses you disconnected. Fit a boost gauge, drive it and observe the boost gauge readings (manifold pressure). If the primary turbo is OK this will make it operate at a lower boost level (5-7psi ?) than the system control (10-17psi) but it will be a purely mechanical operation which will isolate where the fault is.
If there is no boost and the pressure stays zero down then the turbo is not working. Check for the wastegate being stuck or maladjusted. If that is working then you bave a faulty turbo for whatever reason. Maybe there is a loose bolt stuck in it from the engine rebuild?

If the turbo is working OK then it points to an electrical issue with the the boost control solenoid which is inside the wing near the vacuum tank beside the battery compartment. The control voltage from the ecm usually pulses it on/off at a fast rate to give a measured control and it may be stuck. Maybe it is the ecm or maybe the valve. But before you go dig it out, first check the pressure lines such as 10 and 23 are connected or not reversed at their connectors where they go through the wing (just behind the battery)
Good luck

Jan 30, 2010 | 1996 Subaru Legacy

1 Answer

Turbo keeps cutting out, mainly on incline or declines, could this be fuel filters.


Could be one of many things. First off if you can"t remember the last time you changed the fuel filter (there's only one, and it's in plain sight) then do it. It should be replaced every 20k miles. If i were to guess though I would start to look at the turbo actuator system. The turbo is engaged by vaccuum. there's a vac pod on top of the turbo with a vc line going to it. At idle, when you don't want boost there is no vaccuum sent to the actuator pod. The pod is connected to vanes in the turbo that direct the exhaust flow either into or around the blades. Under full throttle vaccuum is sent to the pod to move the vanes inside the turbo to direct exhaust into the blades causing it to spool up and give the car some zip. I have replaced quite a few of the pods. Here"s some more to think about...

Vac is generated by a vac pump off the back of the camshaft. Check to see if there is at least 15" of vac.

VW doesn't provide a port to measure boost. Anywhere. In my opinion all turbo cars should have a boost gauge. Either install one- it's not hard, or get someone with a VAG.com type scanner and see what the boost is. Stock I think was a lazy 13psi under acceleration

Use a vac pump, hook it to the line going to the vac pod on turbo and make sure it HOLDS vac.

other poss. causes- vac leak somewhere else, check all lines

turbo crusted up inside

something else weird.

When you find the problem please let me know. Im curious...

Dec 13, 2009 | 2001 Volkswagen Golf

3 Answers

What does the code P1247 mean? For a Ford f250 2002


The trouble code definition I am finding for the Ford OBD-II System is:

P1247--Turbo Boost Pressure

Oct 07, 2009 | 2002 Ford F250 Super Duty SuperCab

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