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Having problem getting all the air out the cooling system after replacing the thermostat, opened both bleeder valves got some air and coolant out but still overheating and now no coolant out of the bleeders.

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Sounds like you make have another leak somewhere allowing air to enter into the system. I would recommend doing a coolant system pressure test. This will tell you if there is a leak somewhere else.

Posted on Mar 17, 2011

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1 Answer

Car heater blows hot air while driving, but not while idling at a light or in park.


Sounds like you still have air in the system. What engine do you have? There should be a bleeder valve on a housing on the engine where the upper hose attaches.

Fill the reservoir with coolant and open the bleeder valve. Start the engine and let idle. Close the bleeder when a steady stream of coolant comes out. Continue to let the engine idle while periodically opening the bleeder valve to check for air. Keep the coolant level full while the engine is running. Once the fans come on the air should be bled out and the radiator cap can be reinstalled. Snapping the throttle a couple of times will also help push air out of the cooling system.

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Does my car have a bleeder screw for the cooling system?


Those valves sound like fuel pressure test ports. Press down the center of valve and see if gas comes out. If it does, those valves are on the fuel rail, not in the coolant system.
A bleed valve is a bit different. Looks kind of like a grease zerk, with a small hole on its little round head. You put a small wrench on the valve and turn it as if loosening it, but only a turn or two to open it and let coolant or air out the hole on the valve. Look for it on or just close to the thermostat housing.
If you have no bleed valve, best practice is to fill radiator and overflow tank, then start car with the radiator cap off, and let engine run until the thermostat opens (upper radiator hose will get hot when thermostat opens). Now turn off engine and replace radiator cap. This usually gets all the air from coolant system, but sometimes you have to do it again.

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2003 lincoln aviator water boiling and car overheating


Check to coolant level after it cools off and check to see if coolant-water mixture is correct. If those are ok. You could have to much air in the coolant system. Most radiator caps will automatically vent the air out of the coolant system. It could be as simple as a coolant cap that gone bad. Or you may have a air bleed valve on it and you need to bleed the air out manually. To bleed it you will have to crank engine and get it warm. Touch top radiator hose to see if its warm. If not then the thermostat has not opened yet. That could also be the problem. After it gets warm open the bleeder valve if equipped and bleed all the air out. Once the steam and hot air from the valve starts to be gone and pure coolant coming from the valve. You have successfully bleed the coolant system. Cool engine back off and check coolant level once more. Hope this helps.

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Car heater not geting warm


first of all. check coolant level. One way to tell if the coolant is circulating through the heater core is to feel both heater hoses. Both the inlet and outlet return hoses should feel hot when the engine is at normal operating temperature and the heater is on. some vehicles have a "bleeder" valve (or more than one valve) on the thermostat housing and/or certain hose connections. Opening the valve(s) allows air to escape as the system is filled. The valve(s) should then be closed when coolant starts to dribble out the valve. On vehicles that lack these special bleeder valves, it may be necessary to temporarily loosen the heater outlet hose so air can bleed out as the system is filled. A plugged heater core. Accumulated crud in the cooling system may plug the core and block the flow of coolant. The only cure here is to replace the heater core. if above is ok. replace thermostat.

Feb 09, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I have changed the thermostat, and Waterpump. But it is still overheating. Someone said that it might be the head gasket.Will that cost me alot of money? Will that sovle the problem?


Before you tackle the head gaskets I would check a couple other things first:
  • If you just replaced the thermostat and the water pump, that means that you've recently added coolant to the cooling system. I would check for air bubbles in the system by 'burping' it. In order to burb the system you need to open it up either at the radiator cap or at the bleeder valve. On a lot of cars you can find the bleeder valve by following the upper radiator hose to the thermostat. Slightly open the bleeder and squeeze the upper hose a few times to try and work out any air bubbles. You can also run the engine with the bleeder open or the cap off to try and circulate the coolant and allow any air to escape. Air bubbles in the system can cause overheating.
  • Another thing you can check are your fans. Run your car for a while at idle to allow it to heat up. When it gets to the point where it starting to overheat check your cooling fans to see if they're running. If they're not, chances are that the coolant temperature sensor has gone bad which is fairly inexpensive and easy to fix.

If it does end up being the head gaskets then yes, that would cost a lot of money to repair. Let's hope that's not it.

Good Luck!

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1 Answer

Ford falcon gl xf model 1993 overheating


If it is a 4.1 alloy head crossflow then you may have an air blockage in your cooling system and the only way to check this is to undo the bleeder valve on the thermostat housing, start the engine with radiator cap off and once engine is at running temp it should have a steady stream of coolant (no air) coming out through bleeder but if it's intermittent with air and coolant at the same time then you have air in cooling system. To correct this fill radiator with engine still running and what bleeder till there is no more air and just coolant, close bleeder replace radiator cap and problem should be solved if not replace thermostat and follow the above instructions.

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4 Answers

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Fill the resovoir full of coolant then put the cap on. Start the car and let the tempture get about 160 -190 depending on your thermostat. Then proceed to turn the motor off. While the motor is off locate the bleeder valve that is loacted on a metal pipe that runs to the side of the head, Slowly turn the bleeder valve between 3/4 to a full rotation then begin to let the system bleed until there is a steady stream of coolant exiting the valve. Start the vehicle again and repeat till resovoir is full and there is absolutley no air in the system. Failure to do so will result in vapor lock and ultimatley coolant system failure

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2 Answers

I have a 2002 Buick Rendezvous that is overheating, then cooling down, then overheating again. It seems that when I'm on the highway it cools, but local streets, it heats up. I've changed the thermostat...


I ahd the same issue and just had to bleed the air out of the system. Use the bleeder valve on the top of the intake tube, you cant miss it. Stat your car and open that valvethe air/steam will start to come out. Keep that open until you get coolant flowing out of there and then close it. Took me about 5 min. and heat works fine. Please rate my answer to let me know if that was any help. Thanks

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1 Answer

No heat changed thermostat flushed engine new coolant


did you release air from cooling system when replacing coolant!! if air is trapped in system it will not heat up proper. turn fan on high heat locate bleeder for cooling system, open bleeder with car running. if there is any air in system you will see it come out of bleeder. keep checking for heat. when you get heat bring coolant to proper level. leave top off of coolant recovery tank while bleeding system. put cap back on when done.

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2 Answers

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You also could have air in your coolant system. You can't just add coolant on these models after you drain the system or let it run low on coolant. The degas bottles on these models also have a flaw, where they crack along a seam. Sometimes coolant will leak, sometimes not, depending on how high the crack is on the bottle. But what it is guaranteed to do is allow air into your system, which can cause havoc with overheating (air surrounds the thermostat so it doesn't open) and keep coolant from flowing, particularly through the highest point in the system: the heater core. There is a heater core bleeder valve attached to a line near the top of the degas bottle (next to the expension line up top) with a plastic, flathead srewdriver face. Turn the heat on high and run the system at idle for 5 minutes. Then open the valve and keep it open until a steady stream of coolant comes out. (It's like bleeding your brakes.) That will clear any air from the system and at least give you peace of mind that this is not your problem. Then run the motor at 2000 rpms, with the heat still on high, for about 5 minutes or until hot air starts coming out. Release the bleeder valve again until a steady stream comes out. Then let the system cool and check your coolant level and fill as needed. I'd pull the degas bottle and inspect it...should have been a recall.

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