Question about 1990 Ford Mustang

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I was driving on the road when the starter engaged and burn out, I replaced the starter motor, starter relay, and ignition switch. turned the key and starter stays on. had to disconnect battery to stop it. even with the key out I connected the battery and it still turned. its a 1990 ford mustang convertible with a 5.0 dropped into it, standard transmission. i replaced the relay a secound time and it still stays engaged. please help. thank you. -Sergio

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  • Ford Master
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Hello, There are small wires that attach to the Starter Relay. These are the wires Mechanics call "tickler" wires. There should not be power going through the tickler wire unless the Ignition switch is turned to the START position.

Disconnect the small wire off of the Starter Relay. Leave it off and put your battery cable on the Battery. The Starter should not crank. The Ignition should be OFF.

Now we need to find out where the tickler wire is getting power from. Put a Multimeter or test light on the Tickler wire for POS and ground the other wire on the tester to a NEG ground. I suspect your problem is in the Interlock switch. The Interlock switch would be on the Clutch pedal lever under the dash for a standard shift.

If you had an Automatic transmission, the Interlock would be in the shift linkage or Brake pedal lever. Without changing from an Auto to a Standard trans people have trouble hitting the under dash Interlock switch with their shoes getting in and out of their cars. Even while driving you can hit the under-dash switches with your shoes.

So check under the dash for a broken or dislocated switch on the Clutch or Brake pedal levers. Then move the switches until the Test equipment shows the power is not going to the Tickler
wire . Once you do this you have to make the START position work on the Ignition switch. Leave the tickler hooked up to the test equipment until you get the wiring right. You may have to adjust the Ignition shift-rod in the steering column so that START means the correct thing only in the start position.

I hope my solution is very helpful in giving you ideas about fixing your car.

Posted on Mar 17, 2011

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1 Answer

Can a bad starter relay burn out a starter


st people are familiar with fuses - they allow your car's electronics to work while protecting them from over-voltage situations. Relays are similar, but much larger and more powerful. There's a relay for most of the major components on your car, including the fuel pump, the air conditioner compressor and the starter.
Your starter relay is engaged every time you turn the ignition to run. Voltage is sent through the relay and if it has failed, it stops there. With a dead relay, the starter won't work and your engine won't crank. The relay is subjected to very high voltage when you turn the ignition, and this will eventually cause the contact circuit to burn out. It's also possible for the relay's energizing circuit to fail.
n terms of lifespan, your starter relay should last a very long time. Many drivers never have to replace theirs, but this isn't true across the board. Relays can and do fail at any point, including when the car is new. With that being said, starter motor failure is actually more common than a failed relay, and other problems can present similar symptoms, including a dead or dying car battery. f the starter relay fails, it's the same as if your starter motor fails in terms of what you can expect - you'll be stuck where you are until the relay can be replaced. However, there are signs and symptoms that can warn you of an impending failure and knowing these might save you some serious hassle. They include:
  • Starter will not engage at all
  • Starter stays engaged (creating a grinding noise)
  • Starter only works intermittently (usually when the engine is cold

Sep 29, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Intermittently there is a problem starting the car. The key turns on all the electrics but when turned further it does not engage the starter.


Check your ignition switch electrical side
Check the relay
Or the starter motor itself must be playing up

Aug 03, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

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Car won't engage starter


At the starter relay, you have two red or purple wires, one goes to the starter and the other comes from a 30amp fuseable link. Is that fuseable link circuit hot ?
From the key switch, power goes thru the alarm relay, then the clutch safety switch or automatic selector switch, then to the starter relay. The fourth wire on the starter relay is a ground.
You should be able to put power to the starter relay on the white or yellow wire coming from the safety switch to make the relay engage.
My guess is something wrong with the alarm system.

Mar 02, 2014 | 2004 Hyundai Tiburon

1 Answer

Car engine will not turn over


If I understand you right, the problem is the engine will not crank, that is turn over when you turn they ignition key to START. Having said that, might it be that the issue is with the starter system. The starter system is initiated at the ignition switch when the key is turned to start. At this point, the ignition switch then provides +12VDC to a starter relay (if the vehicle has got one) or direct to the starting solenoid. The relay is but a remote switch with slightly higher amperage capacity. The starter relay then engages and supplies +12VDC to the staring solenoid. The starting solenoid then performs two (2) functions. It provides the switching action (hundreds amps) from the battery heavy cable to the actual starter motor. The solenoid likewise pushes a small pinion gear along the shaft of the starter motor to engage the ring gear. The ring gear is of course on the edge of the flywheel which in turn is attached to the crankshaft.

Starter system problems could be corrected by:
1. check battery, battery cables and connections;
2. charge the battery if required;
3. clean brushes and guides of brush holders of the starter motor;
4. clean the commutator and commutator segments;
5. check/replace the armature or field coils if determined to be defective;
6. in some extreme cases it could be the drive pinion or the flywheel gear ring is defective.
7. often it is the big switch that the solenoid activates that looses contacts causing no +12V internally to the motor.
8. Most likely would be a defective starter relay or the IGN switch itself. Relative to this, you might try and check the connectors/terminals and electrical joints.

In the picture below, the upper portion is the starter solenoid while the one below it is the actual starter.
c9b6a69.jpg
Given the amount of work to overhaul a starter, you might consider just replacing it.

So recommended course of action is determine if there is +12VDC at the starter solenoid when IGN switch is turned to START.

Sep 11, 2012 | 2004 Pontiac Grand Prix

1 Answer

I have a 1997 grand prix. Most days it starts. once in a while it will not start. You can sometimes rock key back and forth quickly and it will catch. But most of the time odly enough wait over night and...


When you turn the ignition key to start your car, voltage from the battery flows through the ignition switch to the Park/Neutral safety switch and/or brake pedal or clutch pedal safety switch (you have to push the pedal down before the circuit will complete) to the starter relay or solenoid. When the relay or solenoid is energized by voltage from the ignition switch circuit, it closes a contact that routes more power from the battery directly to the starter to crank the engine. The starter motor spins, pushes the starter drive gear to engage the flywheel and cranks the engine.

Low battery (Check battery voltage, recharge if low, or jump start with another vehicle or battery charger).
Loose or corroded battery cables (Inspect, clean and tighten BOTH ends of BOTH battery cables).
Bad starter relay wiring connections or ground connection (Inspect, clean, tighten wiring connections).
Bad starter relay/solenoid (Check for voltage at relay, if relay has voltage but there is no "click" when key is turned to start, replace relay).
Bad starter (Jump battery voltage direct to starter to see if it spins, or remove starter and have it bench tested at auto parts store).
Damaged starter drive or teeth on flywheel (Remove starter and inspect drive gear and flywheel teeth, replace damaged parts if necessary).
Bad ignition switch (Check to see if voltage reaches starter relay/solenoid when turn to start. If not, check for open P/N switch and brake or clutch pedal switch. Replace ignition switch if defective).
Open P/N safety switch, or open Brake Pedal Safety Switch (automatic transmission) or open Clutch Pedal Switch (manual transmission). Bypass switch with jumper wire to see if engine cranks, or use test light or voltmeter to check for voltage passing through switch when ignition is turned to start.
Engine seized due to bearing failure or internal damage (Use socket and long handle to see if engine can be turned by hand, if not engine is locked up).
Engine hydrolocked due to coolant leak from leaky head gasket (Use socket and wrench to see if engine rotates, remove spark plugs and see if coolant comes out or engine can not be cranked with plugs out).

Jul 14, 2010 | 1997 Pontiac Grand Prix

1 Answer

My car does not start or turn over. The radio works and so does the fan.


When you turn the ignition key to start your car, voltage from the battery flows through the ignition switch to the Park/Neutral safety switch and/or brake pedal or clutch pedal safety switch (you have to push the pedal down before the circuit will complete) to the starter relay or solenoid. When the relay or solenoid is energized by voltage from the ignition switch circuit, it closes a contact that routes more power from the battery directly to the starter to crank the engine. The starter motor spins, pushes the starter drive gear to engage the flywheel and cranks the engine.

Low battery (Check battery voltage, recharge if low, or jump start with another vehicle or battery charger).
Loose or corroded battery cables (Inspect, clean and tighten BOTH ends of BOTH battery cables).
Bad starter relay wiring connections or ground connection (Inspect, clean, tighten wiring connections).
Bad starter relay/solenoid (Check for voltage at relay, if relay has voltage but there is no "click" when key is turned to start, replace relay).
Bad starter (Jump battery voltage direct to starter to see if it spins, or remove starter and have it bench tested at auto parts store).
Damaged starter drive or teeth on flywheel (Remove starter and inspect drive gear and flywheel teeth, replace damaged parts if necessary).
Bad ignition switch (Check to see if voltage reaches starter relay/solenoid when turn to start. If not, check for open P/N switch and brake or clutch pedal switch. Replace ignition switch if defective).
Open P/N safety switch, or open Brake Pedal Safety Switch (automatic transmission) or open Clutch Pedal Switch (manual transmission). Bypass switch with jumper wire to see if engine cranks, or use test light or voltmeter to check for voltage passing through switch when ignition is turned to start.
Engine seized due to bearing failure or internal damage (Use socket and long handle to see if engine can be turned by hand, if not engine is locked up).
Engine hydrolocked due to coolant leak from leaky head gasket (Use socket and wrench to see if engine rotates, remove spark plugs and see if coolant comes out or engine can not be cranked with plugs out).

Jul 14, 2010 | 1995 Suzuki Sidekick

1 Answer

Have a 99 sebring just changed battery and car wonk crank


Hi I am Vortash when you turn the key is there a sound from the engine a clicking noise this would be the pre engaged starter motor solenoid trying to engage if you do then the starter motor may be jammed or faulty or possibly has a bad earth check all your body earthing straps .. ( the lights would work as they dont take much drain but the amperage of the starter motor wouldnt ) .
If after checking the earths you dont hear this then I would suspect that the ignition switch is at fault and the starter motor contacts in the switch have burned out or the starter relay hope this is of help regards vortash

Jul 22, 2009 | 1999 Chrysler Sebring

1 Answer

When starting 1997 aspire in morning-delay in starting


Starter solenoid probably.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sequence of Operation

NOTE: An overrunning clutch in the drive assembly protects the starter motor (11002) from excessive speeds during the brief period before the driver releases the ignition switch (11572) from the START position (as the engine (6007) starts).

  1. The ignition switch is turned to the START position.
  1. The starter solenoid (11390) is energized, creating a magnetic field in the solenoid coil.
  1. The iron plunger core is drawn into the solenoid coil.
  1. A drive lever and pin (11067) connected to the drive assembly engages the starter drive (11350) to the flywheel ring gear.
  1. When the iron plunger core is all the way into the coil, its contact disc closes the circuit between the battery (10655) and the starter motor terminals.
  1. The current flows to the starter motor, and the starter drive cranks the flywheel (6375) and the crankshaft (6303).
  1. As current flows to the starter motor, the pull-in coil is bypassed.
  1. The hold-in coil keeps the starter drive engaged with the flywheel.
  1. The starter drive remains engaged until the ignition switch is released from the START position.

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#1 is the stater with the solenoid on top of it.

Feb 23, 2009 | 1997 Ford Aspire

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