Question about 1997 Buick LeSabre

1 Answer

Still cant get a brake pedal.. been bleeding the lines but not getting much out of them. replaced master cylinder, still no pedal. has all new lines also

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Buick Master
  • 4,977 Answers

You may have to run the motor as you bleed the brakes so the abs hydraulic unit can purge any air that might be caught within the unit itself.did you bench bleed the master cylinder before installing it on the car.this can save time and reduce the possible chance of air entering the system.make sure you don`t allow the master cylinder to run low on brake fluid.i also assume that you are bleeding the brakes properly.Left front brake works with Right rear brake and Right front brake works with Left rear brake.this is how the brakes should be bleed.

Posted on Mar 15, 2011

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

The front drivers side break keeps locking. I have replaced the caliper and now when I pump it no fluid is coming out from the line.


Did air get into the master cylinder? If you can, try bleeding the master cylinder. The fact that you aren't getting any fluid out of the line suggests that the master cylinder isn't pumping fluid.

Master cylinders are (usually) on a split circuit system - that is, the front left brake is on the same line as the rear right. The front right brake is on the same circuit as the rear left.

A point to be aware of is when bleeding brakes/doing brake work and if the master cylinder runs dry, is that a seal inside the master cylinder can fail/twist over and not pressurise that particular line, even though it may pressurise the opposite brake line.

I'm in the UK. I have a 1998 Jeep Grand Cherokee 4 litre, which I am slowly rebuilding. Three weeks ago I fitted new front brake rotors, new front callipers and pads. I've been rebuilding cars for over 40 years now and have done countless brake overhauls.

.. and could I get a hard pedal after the job was completed? I must have bled the brakes three times a day for a week and couldn't get a brake pedal. I phoned a full time mechanic I know - he came and tried to bleed the brakes three times and couldn't get a hard pedal.

That's when you think 'The master cylinder was working before I started the job so it must be still working now'.

I fitted a brand new master cylinder and because some parts for older jeeps are hard to come by in the UK, I fitted a second hand proportioning valve. When I bled the brakes again the pedal became rock solid. Fixed.

You're probably fed up with your braking problem now ... and apparently this 'no fluid/brake pedal' is more common than you may think.

Try bleeding the master cylinder if you can. If you suspect that it isn't fully working - try an overhaul kit which is cheaper than a new master cylinder.

As for changing the proportioning valve .. that's your decision. My brakes now work though the truth is I don't actually know which was at fault as I changed both the master cylinder and proportioning valve at the same time. Maybe both were at fault, for whatever reason. I genuinely don't know.

The positive aspect is that you are doing your own work and know what you're doing. You're saving on labour charges.

Apr 18, 2016 | 1998 Dodge Grand Caravan

2 Answers

Ive got a 1994 Nissan pickup 4x4 cant get brakes to bleed up and stay


may be bad master cylinder ~ you try to gravity bleed them first?

or you may have to bench bleed the master cylinder then re-install, gravity bleed to start

then finish off with the one-man bleeder or 2 person technique


i don't know how you did it, so i'm covering my bases by saying all that

Mar 17, 2015 | Nissan Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Toyota surf brake problem


If you replace the wheel cylinders or brake calipers and did not bleed them properly, you most likely have air in the lines, If the rear brakes are drum brakes they need to be adjusted (if taken apart or new parts put on) or the pedal may sink when pressed.
1. If the brake pedal is soft when pressed down, the brake lines have air in them and need bleeding to remove the air.
2. a soft brake pedal can also be a bad master cylinder. Replace the master cylinder if the lines have been bleed correctly but the pedal is still soft or sinking when the pedal is pressed.

Dec 08, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Air in the fluid master cylinder


Do you mean the brake master cylinder? As long as the fluid is at the full mark, and you have no air in the brake lines, it is fine. A spongy brake pedal and poor braking operation happens when air is in the lines. Air can get into the lines when the fluid in the master cylinder is very low, almost out, or when a brake line is pulled apart (like when replacing calipers). To get the air out, one has to bleed the brakes-starting at the rear tires-the longest run from the master cylinder-and ending at the driver's wheel -nearest the master cylinder. Opening the bleed valve at each wheel in turn and pumping the brakes will force fluid into the lines and push the air out the bleed valve. When done properly, all the air in the brake lines should be expelled, and the brake pedal returns to it's firm pedal and good braking efficiency.

Jul 10, 2012 | 1993 Toyota Supra

1 Answer

Bleeding the clutch after installing/96 bronco xlt


Clutch Master Cylinder ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ Inspect/Replace The clutch master cylinder is located next to the brake master cylinder. A slave cylinder is attached to the release lever at the clutch. The two cylinders are attached hydraulically by tubing and hose.
f62-17.gif A hydraulically operated clutch. To Remove:
  • Take off the reservoir cover and remove the fluid from the reservoir.
  • Disconnect any wires connected to the reservoir or master cylinder body.
  • Disconnect the tubes.
  • Remove the nuts or bolts attaching the master cylinder to the vehicle.
  • Slide the master cylinder off. If it will move only a short distance but no farther, replace one of the nuts or bolts (finger tight) to support the master cylinder and then disconnect the pushrod from the pedal. After disconnecting the clip or pin and clip holding the pushrod to the pedal, try to remove the master cylinder again.
To Replace:
  • When installing a new master cylinder, it is a good practice to flush the cylinder with clean brake fluid. This is done to remove any debris that might be left over from the manufacturing process or chemical coatings that were used to protect the cylinder from corrosion. To flush a master cylinder, simply fill the reservoirs and the cylinder bores about one-third full with clean brake fluid, install the reservoir cover, plug the line ports, shake the cylinder to work the fluid all around, and drain out all the fluid.
  • Bench bleed the cylinder.
  • If the old master cylinder used a boot or hub seal, a new one should be installed as the master cylinder is being replaced.
  • Place the master cylinder in position, replace the mounting bolts or nuts, and tighten them to the correct torque.
  • Reconnect the pushrod to the pedal as necessary.
  • Remove the plugs or bleeder tubes from the outlet port as you connect the line. Do not tighten the line yet. Place a shop cloth under the line fitting to catch any fluid that may leak out.
  • Fill the reservoir about three-fourths full with brake fluid.
  • Have an assistant slowly push the pedal as you observe the connections a the outlet port. They will probably be leaking some fluid with air bubbles. Continue the pedal strokes until only fluid with no air bubbles leaves the connection.
  • At this point, tighten the connection with the pedal is being pushed downward.
  • Fill the reservoir to the correct level and replace the cover.
  • Reconnect any wires that were disconnected.
  • Check the brake pedal free travel and adjust it if necessary. There should be 1/16 to 1/8 in. (1.6 to 3.1 mm) of free travel before the pushrod engages the piston in the master cylinder

May 08, 2012 | Ford Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Replaced master cylinder and wheel cylinders, bleed master cylinder and put all back together. Started bleeding brakes. Cant get any pressure at pedal what should I try?


First bench bleed the master cylinder. Or if its still on the car do this, have some one pump the pedal hold and open one line,do this three times, move to the next line pump three time hold and open the line. Hows the pedal. getting firmer no go ahead bleed as usual. let me know we can fix this together

Apr 22, 2011 | Volkswagen Beetle Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Have an 89 festiva changed 5 master cylinders and still cant bleed front driver and rear pass wheel and also changed distribution block 3 times. i cant bleed it rite from the front port of the master...


Section 06-06: Hydraulic Brake System 1992 Festiva Workshop Manual GENERAL SERVICE OPERATIONS Manual Bleeding
  1. Read Hydraulic System Bleeding General Information.
  1. Clean all dirt from the master cylinder filler cap.
  1. Fill the master cylinder with the specified brake fluid. During the bleeding operation do not allow the master cylinder to run dry.
  1. If the master cylinder is known or suspected to contain air it must be bled before the wheel cylinders or calipers. To bleed the master cylinder, loosen the front line fitting and have an assistant push the brake pedal slowly through its full travel. While the assistant holds the pedal, tighten the brake line fitting. After the line fitting is tightened, the assistant may release the brake pedal. Repeat this procedure on the rear brake line. Repeat the entire process several times to ensure all air has been removed from the master cylinder.
  1. Remove the bleeder screw cap from the appropriate rear wheel cylinder.
  1. Position a box end wrench on the bleeder fitting.
  1. Attach a rubber hose to the bleeder fitting. The hose has to fit snugly around the bleeder fitting.
  1. Submerge the free end of the hose in a container partially filled with brake fluid.
  1. Loosen the bleeder fitting approximately three quarters of a turn.
  1. Have an assistant push the brake pedal slowly through its full travel and hold it there.
  1. Close the bleeder fitting.
  1. Have the assistant release the brake pedal.
  1. Repeat Steps 9 through 12 until air bubbles cease to appear at the submerged end of the bleeder hose.
  1. When the fluid entering the bottle is completely free of bubbles, tighten the bleeder screw, remove the bleeder hose, and install the bleeder screw cap.
  1. Repeat Steps 5 through 14 at the appropriate diagonal front caliper.
  1. Check the master cylinder fluid level. If necessary fill it to the correct level with the specified brake fluid.
  1. Check pedal feel. If the pedal remains spongy, repeat the bleeding process or, if necessary, refer to Diagnosis and Testing in Section 06-00.

Jan 04, 2011 | 1991 Ford Festiva

2 Answers

My 1997 chevy 1500 z71 brakes suddenly going all the way to the floor. Checked brake fluid and it was low. Could be wheel cylinder? Master cylinder? or ?


well, check the brake lines for leakage after adding brake fluid to the full mark. If the brake pedal goes all the way to the floor, it's likely there is a leak somewhere after the master cylinder. If the pedal gets hard after adding fluid, and pumping it several times with the car off, then the master cylinder is still ok.

If air has gotten into the master cylinder, it may have to be bled out on a bench, or using a scanner if that's the way your vehicle is.

Bleeding the Brake System (ABS) Auto Bleed Procedure NOTE: Perform a manual bleeding procedure. If the brake pedal height and firmness results are not achieved, perform the auto bleed procedure below.
NOTE: Perform this procedure when replacing the brake pressure modulator valve or electro-hydraulic control unit.
  1. Perform the manual brake bleeding procedure. Refer to Bleeding the Brake System (non-ABS).
  2. Check the master cylinder fluid level often to prevent running the system dry.
  3. Press the brake pedal firmly and run the Scan Tool Automated Bleed Procedure (for Gas engines) once, or the Function Test (for Diesel engines) four times. Make sure to release the brake pedal between each test.
  4. Perform the manual bleed procedure again. This should remove the remaining air from the brake system.
  5. Bleed the system as many times as needed to obtain the appropriate feel of the brake pedal.

Dec 18, 2010 | 1997 Chevrolet K1500

2 Answers

Brake pedal still goes to floor 2000 GMC Jimmy


It's very possible to be the master cylinder, the o-rings on the piston could be worn, letting the fluid seep back through instead of getting full pressure through the lines. Could also be the brake booster.
Try changing the master cylinder first, which is cheaper and easier, and see if there is a difference, you'll need to bleed the brakes again.
To check the booster,
With the engine off, pump the brakes until the pedal is hard, then hold pressure on the brake pedal and listen for air escaping, or the pedal goes slowly to the floor, Do that after the master cylinder has been changed, at least that will be eliminated.

Sep 15, 2009 | 2000 GMC Jimmy

1 Answer

How do I replace master cylinder myself on 1993 Dodge Cummins


Remove the old master cylinder. Use line wrenches to avoid damage to the brake line fittings. Bench bleed the the new master cylinder you have purchased. The parts store will tell you how to accomplish this and sell you the necessary bleed kit (note it may be included with the master cyl.). Carefully install the new master cylinder. Reconnect the brake lines and do not over tighten. Now with a helper, bleed the brake system. Start at the Right Rear wheel. Find the bleeder located on the back side of the wheel at the wheel cylinder. It should have a small rubber cap. Remove the cap and using a boxed in wrench, loosen the bleeder valve slightly while your helper is applying steady pressure to the brake pedal. The pedal will go to the floor and you will see and hear air bubbles come for the bleeder. Tighten the valve and then tell the helper to release the brake pedal and do it all over again. Keep doing this until no air appears. Periodically check the master cylinder and do not allow the fluid level to get too low as it will **** more air into the system. Remind you helper to never release the brake pedal until you give the OK. If he releases the pedal while the valve is open, air will be drawn into the system. Now after bleeding the RR wheel, move to the LR, then RF, and finish with the LF.

Nov 19, 2008 | 1993 Dodge Ram 250

Not finding what you are looking for?
1997 Buick LeSabre Logo

725 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Buick Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

74945 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22095 Answers

Jeff Turcotte
Jeff Turcotte

Level 3 Expert

7697 Answers

Are you a Buick Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...