Question about 1995 Jeep Grand Cherokee

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1995 Jeep Grand Cherokee noise problem!

I would like to see if ANYBODY can solve this problem! I have only been to about 4/5 mechanics and NOBODY knows what the problem isAbout 8 months ago whenever I would drive approx. 100 miles and start to turn sharp (left or right...doesn't matter which direction), my Jeep "hops" and makes a "binding" noise. I have had the "dope" in the front and backend changeda mechanic replaced a cracked boot. He said there was some grease that had slung out but it was still packed good. I have had tires checked and rotated. Nobody in this town has a clue nor do they really act like they care. I am paying for a vehicle that is in terrible driving shape right now. It started (last week) doing it after about 25 miles. It is really bad. Any advice or suggestions? Thanks alot!! I have the same problem with my 5.8L Grand Cherokee. It seem that the tires are binding everytime you make a turn but this happens only evertime the engine is hot.

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Ok here is how it is simplified. If you have ruled out the front diif and the wheel hub,
The answer is the Viscous Coupling in the transfer case unit its self. these do wear out over time and not uncommon for this to happend eventualy. the short term answer is to replace the transfer cas or have the transfer case rebuilt

A viscous coupling is made up of alternating circular plates. The plates have tabs or perforations in them. The plates are mounted in a sealed drum, and are located very close to each other. The drum is filled with silicone, or some dilatant fluid. When the two sets of plates are rotating in unison, the fluid stays cool and remains in a liquid state. When the plates start rotating at two different speeds, the shear effect of the tabs or perforations on the fluid will cause it to heat up and solidify (Silicone when heated will turn into a near solid; the viscosity of dilatant fluids rapidly increases with shear). The fluid in this state will essentially glue the plates together and transmit power from one set of plates to the other. The size of the tabs or perforations on the plates, along with the number of plates and fluid used will determine the strength and onset of when this mechanical transfer will happen.
Viscous couplings are used as the center differential in some 4WD/AWD vehicles such as the Toyota Celica GT-Four, and also as a limited slip differential (LSD) in rear axles.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viscous_coupling_unit


Quadra-Trac
The Quadra-Trac name is used on a variety of full-time 4WD systems. The first version was launched in 1973, with a new unrelated system used in the 1980s. Yet another system carried the name in the 1990s.
Quadra-Trac was the trade name for the Borg-Warner 1305 and 1339 gear case. It was a chain-drive system introduced in 1973 on the full-sized jeep line which included the Wagoneer, Cherokee, and trucks behind the AMC-specific Turbo-Hydramatic 400 automatic transmission. CJ7's also received the Quadra-trac. This system included a differential to shift torque between front and rear which could be locked with vacuum. The 1305 lacked a low-range, while the 1339 offered an optional 2.57 planetary gear. A Quadratrac transfer case can be upgraded from a non low range equipped unit to having low range by swapping in the optional planetary housing and shift rod and floor shifter assembly from another transfer case. Consult a factory service manual for service procedures.
The Jeep Quadra-Trac was differentiated from the open New Process Gear NP203 used by Dodge, General Motors, and Ford in that it included a center limited slip differential feature, in this case a clutch pack.
The part-time case available in these vehicle at this time was the Dana 20.
Applications:

  • Jeep Wagoneer 1973–1979
  • Jeep Cherokee 1973–1979
  • Jeep Pick-up 1973–1979
  • Jeep CJ-7 1976–1979
The Borg-Warner system was replaced with a New Process Gear NP219-based chain-driven system in 1980 [1]. Applications:
  • Jeep Wrangler 1987
  • Jeep Cherokee (XJ) 1984–1987
The NP229-based system New Process Gear was replaced with a New Venture Gear NV249-based chain-driven system in 1996.
The NP249/NV249 utilizes a "Viscous Coupler" to determine power transfer between the front and rear axles. The goal of this device is to provide smooth and efficient 4WD operation on dry surfaces--if a differential in speed occurs between the axles, heat buildup in the viscous coupler transfers power to the slower axle, providing some traction in off road conditions.
1993-1995 NP249 transfer cases used the viscous coupler to transfer power in both high and low ranges.
1996-1998 NV249 transfer cases had a low-lock capability, meaning a hard gear transferred power in 4LO (front and rear drive shafts are locked at same speed in low range).
Applications:
  • Jeep Grand Cherokee (ZJ) 1993–1998

Posted on Jun 18, 2009

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Hey dcd1020,

Let's stick to the first car. If it does it all the time, the symptoms say it all, your hubs are locking. Your transfer case may be in 2WD (then again...). But your two front wheels are no longer spinning independently of one another.

State my case:
When you travel in a straight line, all four wheel are rotating at the same rate, traveling the same distance.

When you turn, this is no longer the case. 'How much different could it be', you ask.

Say you are turning in a circle and from the center of that circle it's 25 feet to your Jeep (and the closer set of tires).. Then it would be about 30 feet to the other set of tires.

That means for every time around, the inner wheels travel 157 feet while the outer wheels travel 188 feet. (I did the math)

Thirty foot difference for 360 degrees.
Divide that by 4, that's a 7-1/2 foot difference in distance traveled between left and right side to make a turn into a parking lot.

If your wheels were spinning independently, no problem.
If you're off road, no problem
But on pavement, if your drive train is locked, even partially, your tires are going to grip.

They will chirp, hop and jump trying to stay even, your front axle becomes a twisted steel spring trying to release a half revolution of energy any way it can.
No wonder it's bucking like a bronco.

What I find hard to believe is that after 8 months nothing has broken yet.

I'll bet its worse when the turn is tighter.
I know your front tire tread is disappearing.

OK Prove it:

  • Get 4 jack stands, put it on a lift or whatever. Just get all four wheels off the ground (after it starts acting up). As you lift the wheels off the ground, any remaining tension will release. Stand clear of the wheels.
  • Spin one of the front wheels. What's the other one do?
  • Is the front drive shaft spinning? It shouldn't be.
  • Is the rear drive shaft spinning? It really shouldn't be.
  • Start it up, put it in gear. How many wheels are spinning?
OK Fix it:
  • This will either be simple or tough (no middle ground). but I can point you in the right direction. Maybe one of your local 'experts' is a better mechanic than diagnostician.
  • If your hubs lock manually, try unlocking them. Is there a difference?
  • If you have 'Command-trac', check the vacuum lines running to the shift motor on the front axle and the shift motor itself. Remove the motor, check the fork, linkage, etc.
  • Check the linkage on the transfer case.
  • Check the hubs for evidence of extreme temperature.
Question: Was anything going on just before this started? Recent work done, someone borrow it, heavy terrain or off roading?

Question: Did that cracked boot you mentioned happen before or after all this began?

Hope this helps.
Please get back to me when you get to the root of the problem. I'm real curious as to what caused it.

Mike

Posted on Aug 06, 2008

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Hello dcd1020, I have a 1995 JGC Limited 5.2. I believe I had this same problem. It is your steering gear box. I was told that the way this steering gear box was created is so lame that it is a reaccuring problem. I found this to be true. I replaced it, problem fixed, but within 6 mos. it went bad again( this was covered in the one year full replacement). Then it went bad a again 1year and 5 days and I had to pay for it again. I also realize that most of my front end parts need replaced also. I fortuntely got a good deal on replacing these parts at a price of $1500.00. If you need any more info. please contact me gnctransport at yho period c... Good luck. I love my 1995 Jeep, and what ever it needs it gets. 186,000 miles and all I need to get done is replace my heater core which I have had to unhook hose from heater core and directly hook with the hose that was next to it. The antifreeze smell in the summer was making me have migraines. This Jeep will get you where u need to go in a blizzard. I am a auto transporter in the USA and I have tried almost every year inbetween to the 2008, and they can not come close to getting me out of my steep 3 block length driveway or snow or ice. Only my 1995 all-the-time 4X4 has passed every situation.Tip** use your OD button right below rear defrost button, faithfully. Push in everytime you jump in, and turn off when ever u travel over 35mph. Will save U $ on repairs. Also don't borrow your jeep out, and miss the big bumps, rough streets,and poor in/out exits. More u baby, better u b. I do get good gas mileage by using my OD BUTTON properly. Better then my kids 2001 trailblazer,and 1999 luminia. I also had a 1984 JEEP WRANGLER, I was happy with it to. But 1995 was the year for the JEEP!!! Hope this helps! Christina

Posted on Aug 13, 2008

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Hi, this is a common transmission fault, it is cured by applying Mopar friction modifier/limited slip additive to the rear axle 60ml, half of the tube.
Mopar part No 05103522EA
MS10111.

gjnuwave UK

Posted on Oct 21, 2010

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