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P2196,pcm replaced,o2 sensor replaced,maf replaced,engine head replaced,injectors replaced,code still there and engine missfire

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HI
P2196 REFER TO THE O2 SENSOR ONLY ???
the most cause of it :-
o2 sensor
fuel pressure
fuel injectors
air intake restricted

check for that and ask me for more information
with my best wishes

Posted on Jul 31, 2008

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What are the probable causes of DTC P0300 on this unidentified vehicle?


plugs, wires, coils, low compression, bad pcm, improper fuel pressure, bad fuel, worn out cam, plugged injector, plugged cat, bad O2 sensor, bad MAF, and Vacuum leaks can cause multiple cylinder missfires along with many other things

Aug 15, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

What are the probable causes of DTCs P0172, P0174, P2195, and P2196?


check for a vacuum leak the following is code p2195 all 4 codes are usually connected to one problem INFO courtset of OBD.com Sensor 1) Code OBD-II Trouble Code Technical Description O2 A/F Sensor Signal Biased/Stuck Lean (Bank 1 Sensor 1) What does that mean? This code is a generic powertrain code. It is considered generic because it applies to all makes and models of vehicles (1996-newer), although specific repair steps may be slightly different depending on the model. On some vehicles, such as Toyotas, this is actually referring to A/F sensors, Air/Fuel ratio sensors. Which are basically more sensitive versions of oxygen sensors. The powertrain control module (PCM) monitors the air/fuel ratio of the exhaust using oxygen (O2) sensors, and tries to keep things at the normal air/fuel ratio of 14.7:1 via the fuel system. The oxygen A/F sensor outputs a voltage reading that the PCM uses. This DTC is set when the air/fuel ratio as read by the PCM has strayed so far from 14.7:1 that the PCM can no longer correct it. Bank #1 is the side of the engine that contains cylinder #1. This code specifically refers to the sensor between the engine and catalytic converter (not the one behind it). Note: This DTC is very similar to P2196, P2197, P2198. If you have multiple DTC codes, always fix them in the order they appear. Symptoms For this DTC, the malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) will illuminate. There may be other symtoms. Causes Potential causes of a P2195 code include: Oxygen (O2) or A/F ratio sensor or sensor heater malfunction Open or short in O2 sensor circuit (wiring, harness) Fuel pressure or fuel injector problem Faulty PCM Intake air or engine vacuum leaks Faulty fuel injector(s) Fuel pressure too high or too low PCV system leak/fault A/F sensor relay faulty MAF sensor malfunction ECT sensor malfunction Fuel pressure too low Fuel leak Air suction in air intake system Diagnostic Steps & Possible Solutions Use a scan tool to get readings from the sensor, and monitor the short and long term fuel trim values and O2 sensor or Air Fuel Ratio sensor readings. Also, look at the freeze frame data to see the conditions at the time the code was set. That should help determine if the O2 AF sensor is operating correctly. Compare with manufacturers values. If you don't have access to a scan tool, you could use a multimeter and back-probe the terminals on the O2 sensor wiring connector. Check for shorts to ground, short to power, open circuits, etc. Compare specs with manufacturers specifications. Visually inspect the wiring & connectors leading to the sensor, check for loose connectors, wires rubbed/chaffed, melted wires, etc. Repair as necessary. Visually inspect vacuum lines. You can also test for vacuum leaks using propane or carburetor cleaner along the hoses while the engine is running, if the RPMs change you likely found the leak. Be very careful if doing that, and have a fire extinguisher within reach in case something goes wrong. For example, on a bunch of Ford vehicles, the hose that goes from the PCV to the throttle body can melt causing P2195, P2197, P0171, and/or P0174 codes. If a vacuum leak is determined to be the problem, it would be prudent to replace all vacuum lines if they are getting older, becoming brittle, etc. Use a digital volt ohm meter (DVOM) to check other sensors mentioned such as MAF, IAT, for proper operation. Perform a fuel pressure test, verify readings against manufacturers specification. If you're on a budget and you only have an engine with more than one bank and the problem is only with one bank, you could swap the sensor from one bank to the other, clear the code, and see if the code is followed to the other bank. That would tell you it is the sensor/heater itself that's failed. Check for outstanding technical service bulletins (TSB) for your vehicle, in some cases the PCM can be recalibrated to fix this (not a common fix though). TSBs could also call for replacement of the sensor. When replacing oxygen / AF sensors, be sure to use a high quality ones. In many cases non-OEM sensors are of lesser quality and will not perform correctly. We strongly recommend you stick with OEM brand replacements.

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p2195
Copyright © OBD-Codes.com

Jul 24, 2015 | 2003 Ford Expedition

1 Answer

Im getting a po191, po171 ans p2197 on my 2006 f250 super duty.


P0171 OBD-II Trouble Code Technical Description System Too Lean (Bank 1) What does that mean? Basically this means that an oxygen sensor in bank 1 has detected a lean condition (too much oxygen in the exhaust). On V6/V8/V10 engines, Bank 1 is the side of the engine that has cylinder #1. The P0171 is one of the more common trouble codes. This code is triggered by the first downstream (front) O2 sensor. The sensor provides a reading of the air:fuel ratio leaving the engine's cylinders, and the vehicles powertrain/engine control module (PCM/ECM) uses that reading and adjusts to keep the engine running at that optimum ratio of 14.7:1. If something is not right and the PCM cannot maintain the 14.7:1 ratio, but rather there is too much air, it triggers this code. You'll want to also read our article on short and long term fuel trims to help understand the operation of the engine. Note: This DTC is very similar to P0174, and in fact your vehicle may show both codes at the same time. This diagnostic trouble code (DTC) is a generic OBD-II powertrain code. It is considered generic because it applies to all makes and models of vehicles (1996-newer), although specific repair steps may vary depending on the model. Symptoms You will more than likely not notice any drivability problems, although there may be symptoms such as: a lack of power detonation (spark knock) rough idle hesitation/surge on acceleration. Causes A code P0171 may mean that one or more of the following has happened: The MAF (Mass Air Flow) Sensor is dirty or faulty Note: The use of "oiled" air filters may cause the MAF to become dirty if the filter is over-oiled. There is also an issue with some vehicles where the MAF sensors leak the silicone potting material used to protect the circuitry. There could be a vacuum leak downstream of the MAF sensor Possible cracked vacuum or PCV line/connection Faulty or stuck open PCV valve Failed or faulty oxygen sensor (bank 1, sensor 1) Sticking/plugged or failed fuel injector Low fuel pressure (possible plugged/dirty fuel filter!) Exhaust leak between engine and first oxygen sensor Possible Solutions A lot of times, cleaning the MAF sensor and finding/fixing vacuum leaks fix the problem. If you're on a tight budget, start there, but that may not be the fix for certain. So, possible solutions include: Clean the MAF sensor. Consult your service manual for it's location if you need help. I find it's best to take it off and spray it with electronics cleaner or brake cleaner. Make sure you are careful not to damage the MAF sensor, and make sure it's dry before reinstalling Inspect all vacuum and PCV hoses, replace/repair as required Inspect all hoses and connections in the air intake system Inspect and/or test the intake manifold gaskets for leakage Check for a dirty fuel filter and proper fuel pressure Ideally you'll want to monitor short and long term fuel trims using an advanced scan tool If you have access, you may want to run a smoke test

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0171
Copyright © OBD-Codes.com

P0191 Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor Circuit Range/Performance

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/
Copyright © OBD-Codes.com

P2197 O2 Sensor Signal Biased/Stuck Lean (Bank 2 Sensor 1) Code OBD-II Trouble Code Technical Description O2 A/F Sensor Signal Biased/Stuck Lean (Bank 2 Sensor 1) What does that mean? This code is a generic powertrain code. It is considered generic because it applies to all makes and models of vehicles (1996-newer), although specific repair steps may be slightly different depending on the model. On some vehicles, such as Toyotas, this is actually referring to A/F sensors, Air/Fuel ratio sensors. Which are basically more sensitive versions of oxygen sensors. The powertrain control module (PCM) monitors the air/fuel ratio of the exhaust using oxygen (O2) sensors, and tries to keep things at the normal air/fuel ratio of 14.7:1 via the fuel system. The oxygen A/F sensor outputs a voltage reading that the PCM uses. This DTC is set when the air/fuel ratio as read by the PCM is lean (too much oxygen in the mixture) and has strayed so far from 14.7:1 that the PCM can no longer correct it. This code specifically refers to the sensor between the engine and catalytic converter (not the one behind it). Bank #2 is the side of the engine that does not contain cylinder #1. Note: This DTC is very similar to P2195, P2196, P2198. If you have multiple DTC codes, always fix them in the order they appear. Symptoms For this DTC, the malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) will illuminate. There may be other symtoms. Causes Potential causes of a P2197 code include: Oxygen (O2) or A/F ratio sensor or sensor heater malfunction Open or short in O2 sensor circuit (wiring, harness) Fuel pressure or fuel injector problem Faulty PCM Intake air or engine vacuum leaks Faulty fuel injector(s) Fuel pressure too high or too low PCV system leak/fault A/F sensor relay faulty MAF sensor malfunction ECT sensor malfunction Fuel pressure too low Fuel leak Air suction in air intake system Diagnostic Steps & Possible Solutions Use a scan tool to get readings from the sensor, and monitor the short and long term fuel trim values and O2 sensor or Air Fuel Ratio sensor readings. Also, look at the freeze frame data to see the conditions at the time the code was set. That should help determine if the O2 AF sensor is operating correctly. Compare with manufacturers values. If you don't have access to a scan tool, you could use a multimeter and back-probe the terminals on the O2 sensor wiring connector. Check for shorts to ground, short to power, open circuits, etc. Compare specs with manufacturers specifications. Visually inspect the wiring & connectors leading to the sensor, check for loose connectors, wires rubbed/chaffed, melted wires, etc. Repair as necessary. Visually inspect vacuum lines. You can also test for vacuum leaks using propane or carburetor cleaner along the hoses while the engine is running, if the RPMs change you likely found the leak. Be very careful if doing that, and have a fire extinguisher within reach in case something goes wrong. For example, on a bunch of Ford vehicles, the hose that goes from the PCV to the throttle body can melt causing P2195, P2197, P0171, and/or P0174 codes. If a vacuum leak is determined to be the problem, it would be prudent to replace all vacuum lines if they are getting older, becoming brittle, etc. Use a digital volt ohm meter (DVOM) to check other sensors mentioned such as MAF, IAT, for proper operation. Perform a fuel pressure test, verify readings against manufacturers specification. If you're on a budget and you only have an engine with more than one bank and the problem is only with one bank, you could swap the sensor from one bank to the other, clear the code, and see if the code is followed to the other bank. That would tell you it is the sensor/heater itself that's failed. Check for outstanding technical service bulletins (TSB) for your vehicle, in some cases the PCM can be recalibrated to fix this (not a common fix though). TSBs could also call for replacement of the sensor. When replacing oxygen / AF sensors, be sure to use a high quality ones. In many cases non-OEM sensors are of lesser quality and will not perform correctly. We strongly recommend you stick with OEM brand replacements.

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p2197
Copyright © OBD-Codes.com

May 09, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

2005 ford Mustang code p2198 is the diagnosis if found on my xcalibrator 2 should I replace the o2 sensor or delete that code and see what happens


Its always a good idea to double check codes especially with sensors, if its the heater circut replace o2 if its out of range reset and see if returns

Apr 05, 2015 | 2005 Ford Mustang

1 Answer

I have a 2007 ford taurus with p0300-p0303, p0306, p0316, p2195 and p2196. engine doesnt start anymore but battery is fine.


The old give me money for nothing statement from a mechanic instead of knowing how to fix it.
code p0300 refers to random/ multiple cylinder/s misfire detected===causes--spark plug/s---HT lead/s---injector/s---ignition coil/s--low compression--wiring
code po303 refers to cylinder 3 misfire detected--- engine mechanical fault---wiring---ignition/ fuel system---injector --ECT/MAF sensor --- ECM
code p0306 refers to cylinder 6 misfire detected===causes --engine mechanical fault---wiring---ignition / fuel system---injector ---ECT/MAF sensor---ECM
code po316 refers to misfire detected during start up--first 1000 revs==causes--engine mechanical fault---wiring---ignition /fuel system---injector
code po2195 refers to heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) 1 bank 1 signal stuck lean===cayses ---HO2S---fuel pressure---injectors---intake leak
it also refers to O2S sensor 1 bank 1 same causes and also refers to HO2S 1 bank 1 implausible signal===causes --- short to positive---short to ground---Ho2S ---ECM
code po2196 refers to the same items as 2195 . some causes are also air intake restricted
Have a compression test done some where else and it will indicate the condition of the motor. The rest is sensors and wiring problems.

Jan 05, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

P2097 p2196 p2626


P2097 Post Catalyst Fuel Trim System Too Rich
P2196 O2 Sensor Signal Stuck Rich
P2626 O2 Sensor Pumping Current Trim Circuit/Open
yeah, you really have a bad O2 sensor
_________________careucar.com

Apr 23, 2013 | 2008 Hyundai Elantra

2 Answers

Engine sputters on iddle.


The codes for the O2 sensors mean they are not providing the data expected by the computer. Sometimes this means there is a problem upstream in the engine.
If the engine is missfiring on one or more cylinders, it should set a code for those cylinders. Same thing with a vac leak.
But low fuel pressure would not normally set a code.
Depending on which sensors are setting codes, the catalytic converter could be faulty. Even a dirty air filter can cause problems with the O2 sensors.

Jul 04, 2012 | 2004 Cadillac Deville

1 Answer

I have five codes P2237 P2196 P2271 P0030 P0171 and a P2237 pending code on a 2005 elantra.The car runs poorly, bad gas mileage, sluggish with the check engine light on.Are all O2 sensors bad or maybe the...


P2237 P2196 P2271 P0030 P0171

These are all O2 sensor trouble codes, except P0171 which is a fuel trim code,

You have a bad 02 sensor - up stream - Bank 1 Sensor 1.

Replace it, then road test. The engine computer has a 'default' fuel trim it uses when an O2 sensor fails so it can protect the catalytic converter. If this hasn't been going on too long, good chance simply replacing the O2 sensor will remedy your problem.

Feb 06, 2011 | Hyundai Elantra Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I HAVE A 1998 FORD EXPLORER AND IT HESITATES ON ACCELERATION AND SOMETIMES IDLES ROUGH. I REPLACED THE SPARK PLUGS, WIRES, AND THE COIL PACK AND STILL HAVE THIS PROBLEMS. THE CODES SHOW MISSFIRES IN BANK 3...


Try running some fuel injector cleaner through your fuel tank. What you may have are a couple of plugged or missfiring fuel injectors. I would suggest checking all of your wiring to your injectors to insure good connection, replace your fuel filter and check for vacuum leaks.

Jul 20, 2009 | 1998 Ford Explorer

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