Question about Plymouth Sundance

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Electric radiator motor shorted to ground and burned wiring from motor thru harness. fusible links also. to get home bought new fan/motor assembly and wired hot to run all the time. My problem is what to fix and can I get another wiring harness.

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Yes you can get a new wiring harness,from your plymouth dealer, or junkyard. its best to get a new one because they always are improved from the original.

Posted on Jul 28, 2008

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Car does not come on


The car electrical system will have some fuses and perhaps fusible links as well. Fusible links look like wire but are designed to burn out if there is a overload or short to ground situation. Lastly I would look at the ground that goes from the battery to where it connects to the frame or engine since corrosion and being pulled on may loosen that connection.

It would be a great idea to find someone who understands electronic troubleshooting because it is too easy to damage expensive electronic parts in the auto.

Dec 20, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Where is fusible lik on 2001 Avalon


It'll be a section of wire inside the wiring harness somewhere near the device it protects. It'll be a short section of flexible wire a little smaller than the wires that it's spliced to at both ends. The idea is that if enough current flows through the wire to burn up the wire, the fusible link will burn through first, sparing the rest of the harness.

Aug 02, 2014 | 2001 Toyota Avalon

1 Answer

We bought two new battery's a new alternator checked all fusible links from alternator to battery. Truck only runs for a few days with battery light on then we have to charge the battery. It's an 2004


open or shorted alternator circuit (control wire)
let your auto store test the alternator charging
on and off the truck.
inspect 3 wire connector for burn or lose connection
disconnect 3 pin wire and start the engine.if the light stay on you have shot to ground.

Mar 25, 2014 | Ford Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have an 84 impala and my alternator belt snapped off. Once i replaced the alternator belt, the car started and drove fine except my horn, interior lights, head lights, and tail lights don't work. I...


Circuit Breakers

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One device used to protect electrical components from burning out due to excessive current is a circuit breaker. Circuit breakers open and close the flow path for the electricity rapidly in order to protect the circuit if current is excessive. A circuit breaker is used on components which are more likely to draw excessive current such as the breaker found in the light switch that protects the headlight circuit. A separate 30 amp breaker mounted on the firewall or fuse block protects the power window and seat circuits, as applicable.

Fusible Links

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A fusible link is a protective device used in an electrical circuit and acts very much like a standard fuse. The major difference lies in that fusible links are larger and capable of conducting a higher amperage than most fuses. When the current increases beyond the rated amperage for a given link, the fusible metal of the wire link will melt, thus breaking the electrical circuit and preventing further damage to any other components or wiring. Whenever a fusible link is melted because of a short circuit, correct the cause before installing a new one. Most models have four fusible links.
REPLACING FUSIBLE LINKS

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable, followed by the positive cable. If the link is connected to the junction block or starter solenoid, disconnect it there as well.
  2. Cut the wiring harness right behind the link connector(s) and remove.
  3. Strip the insulation off the harness wire back 1 / 2 in (12.7mm).
  4. Position the clip around the new link and wiring harness or new connector and crimp it securely. Then, solder the connection, using rosin core solder and sufficient heat to guarantee a good connection. Repeat for the remaining connection.
  5. Tape all exposed wiring with electrical tape or use a heat shrink tube, if available. Where necessary, connect the link to the junction block or started solenoid. Reconnect the positive, followed by the negative battery cables.

Oct 21, 2013 | 1984 Chevrolet Impala

1 Answer

Burning fusible link


Well its burning because of too much current flowing thru the wire, or too much resistance in one of the connections. The wire acts like a fuse to protect the circuit.
So you would need to figure out if there is a short to ground in the circuit, or if the problem is too much resistance.

Jun 22, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Where is the fusible link for the cooling fan on a 93 Mercury Topaz?


I can supply only general information. There are actually three fusible links: a 20GA DK BLU (YEL wire), a 20GA BLU (RED/LT GRN wire), and a 14GA DK GRN (YEL wire). All three wires connect to the constant control relay module which has a RED output wire connected to the powertrain control module (PCM), a BLK/LT GRN wire connected to ground, two DK BLU wires connected to the electric cooling fan, a TAN/ORG wire connected to the PCM, a LT GRN/PPL wire connected to the fan, and a LT BLU wire connected to the PCM. Sorry for the roundabout description but it's all the information I have

Oct 07, 2012 | Mercury Topaz Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Location of cooling fan fuse


The radiator cooling fan on your 1990 Ford Thunderbird Super-Coupe is supplied power via the BLACK, 18 Gauge, fusible link near the battery.
If your cooling fan is not getting any power to operate (and you are certain that the fan motor is in good working order) the most likely cause of you fan not working is a failure in the Constant Control Relay Module (CCRM), which is mounted to the upper radiator support.

I have replaced many of these because the circuit boards inside them like to burn.

HERE IS HOW TO TEST IT:

Check for power at the CCRM on pins 3 and 4 BLACK/ORANGE wires. If there is power there, the fusible link is good. If there is no power at these connectors, repair the fusible link or the circuit between the fusible link and the CCRM.

Then, the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) turns the fan on by grounding the fan relays inside the CCRM at Pins 14 and 17.

So if you have power on the BLACK ORANGE wires, You should be able to manually turn the fan on by grounding Pin 14 (TAN/ORANGE) for fan LOW speed and Pin 17 (GREEN/PURPLE) for fan HIGH speed.

If grounding these wires does not get the power to come on at the fan motor, then the CCRM needs to be replaced.

If this makes the power come on (at the motor connector) but the motor will not run, then you need to replace the fan motor.

If grounding these wires makes the motor run, you have a problem with the engine coolant temperature sensor or the PCM.

Apr 22, 2012 | 1990 Ford Thunderbird

1 Answer

Where do i trace my orange/blue wire to from alternator? i have new alternator and batteries, but won't charge. will charge if i jump orange/blue to positive post. Any good suggestions? Thanks Phil


The orange/light blue wire is connected to the red (positive) wire from the battery, through a fusible link (or two links depending on engine size) to pin #3 of the voltage regulator at the alternator. The fusible link will be in the harness so you may have to disassemble the harness. The fusible link is probably blown. This was probably caused by the defective alternator/regulator assembly.

According to my diagram, it appears to go from the red batt wire to a gray 12 gauge fusible link, into a brown 18 gauge link, then turns into the orange/light blue wire and to the alternator.

(A fusible link is a piece of wire that acts like a fuse and will burn out, opening the circuit when amperage above its rating. This protects the circuit and lessens the chance of fire).

Good luck, please ask if you need more info.

May 03, 2011 | 2003 Ford F250 Super Duty Crew Cab

2 Answers

Replaced A 60am Fuse ,Ran For Two Days. Car Died and now i have no electrial juice to the whole car. suspect fuseable link.


You may be correct about the fusible link. Replacing a blown fuse without finding and repairing the reason it blew only leads to more problems and possible severe damage to wiring harnesses. Fuses are NEVER the CAUSE of an electrical problem. Blown fuses are ALWAYS the RESULT of an electrical problem. I would recommend taking the vehicle to someone who has access to the wiring diagrams and the proper equipment necessary to repair your electrical system. A blown 60 Amp fuse is nothing to play with. That fuse gave up it's life to stop your vehicle from burning to the ground. Please don't make it die in vain...car fires are never pretty!

Jan 24, 2011 | 1992 Buick Regal

1 Answer

Cooling fan is not working


INSPECTION 1. Check for a burnt fusible link with an ohmmeter. 2. If a fusible link burns out, there is a short or some other problem in the circuit. Carefully determine the cause and correct it before replacing the fusible link. The fusible link will burn out within 15 seconds if a higher than specified current flows through the circuit Radiator 30A Pink
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Jul 13, 2008 | Hyundai Motor 1998 Sonata

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