Question about 2004 Volvo S40

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S40 2.0d engine

My 2004 Volvo with 60k mileage has developed a sudden major problem
with the oil finding its way into the water cooling system. I have been told that it could be the head gasket or a cracked cylinder head or block equally the dealer has said that he has not previously come across this problem with this particular engine

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You said oil? could it be trans fluid because of a bad radiator,if its a auto trans car/yes it could be a head gasket if this car ever had the common bad cooling fan problems,has it been wrecked,has it been overheated,have you owned it from new,/its would be rare to have a cracked block

Posted on Aug 26, 2008

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Oil and water mixing 2004 m benz c200engine oil in


unlikely to be engine oil, more likely transmission oil from faulty transmission oil cooler in radiator tank
take it in for a proper diagnosis and quote
the coolant system will have to be properly and completely flushed

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What makes a 04 envoy run hot and lose oil?


A hot running engine is usually caused by a cooling system problem. Make sure the coolant level is full and the thermostat.. rad fan.. radiator cap and water pump are all functioning correctly. Make sure there are no restrictions in front of the radiator to obstruct air flow and coolant circulates properly throughout the radiator. As for losing oil, check for the obvious..... Leaks. If no major leaks and you have a high mileage engine, suspect the oil to be burning within the engine. A constantly hot running engine can also cause the oil to break down quicker resulting in consumption, especially if oil changes are neglected

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Why do I have engine oil in the cooling system?


Re you sure it is engine oil? Or is it transmission fluid? Automatic transmission cars usually have a transmission oil cooler in the radiator. These can crack and leak fluid into the cooling system. It will act quite often like engine oil. It will eventually turn blackish in color because the trans fluid will eat away at the rubber hoses in the cooling system, and turn them into jelly.

Mar 15, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

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My mechanic said he is hearing about water mixing oil for the first time. pls, advice


If water is mixing with the engine oil then the head gasket has gone!

Nov 08, 2014 | 2001 BMW X5 3.0i

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1994 2.2 toyota camery has watter in the sparck plug and some of the time has back preusere that will take the ploug out


The only water in your engine is in the cooling system. Coolant does not belong in the compression chamber so there has been a major breach. Think bad head gasket or cracked head/block. In any event you have a major expensive problem there. Most likely your cheapest way out is to find a used engine, with much lower mileage, at a junkyard. Toyota no doubt put that same engine in many models in many years. Large junkyards have a parts interchange to tell you what years and models and also junkyards have a search system to find you an engine elsewhere if they do not have one.

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What is required to get done on a 60k mile maintenance schedule?


60,000 Mile Service Schedule
  • Inspect 4x2 front wheel bearings; replace grease and grease seals, and adjust bearings
  • Change automatic transmission fluid
  • Inspect automatic transmission fluid level (if equipped with underhood dipstick)
  • Replace fuel filter
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  • Inspect brake pads/shoes/rotors/drums, brake lines and hoses, and parking brake system
  • Inspect complete exhaust system and heat shields
  • Inspect engine cooling system and hoses
  • Replace engine air filter
  • Change engine oil and replace oil filter (Up to 5 quarts of oil. Perform at specified mileage interval or every 6 months, whichever occurs first)
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Sep 14, 2010 | 2004 Ford F150

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Do I need the differential oil changed. I have 65,000 on 2500 silverado 2004


hello there here is a maintenance schedule i just recieved from the gm corp
At 30k, 60k, 90k, 120k and 150k miles
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  • Replace passenger compartment air filter (if applicable)
  • ****** READ THIS Change automatic transmission/transaxle fluid and filter.


  • Inspect front disk brake system (twice per year)
  • Inspect rear brake system (twice per year)
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1 Answer

2001 volvo s440 1.9t


Volvo Radiator, Thermostat and Sensors Your cooling system's temperature controls include all coolant temperature sensors, Volvo thermostat, Volvo radiator or expansion tank cap, cooling fan(s) and fan clutch (if equipped). These cooling system parts function primarily independent of the engine but control the engine either through cooling or by sending control signals to your Volvo's electronic systems.
The Volvo thermostat is a spring-loaded valve that opens and closes based on the temperature of the coolant flowing through it. A high temperature reading followed by a drop to normal temperature (or a continuously low temperature) is a common first sign of a sticking Volvo thermostat. However, many other conditions may cause these symptoms, so you need to know how to eliminate each possibility.
The Volvo radiator or expansion tank cap is also a spring-loaded valve reacting to system pressure. It serves to maintain proper system coolant level at predetermined pressures. It must always be replaced with an exact replacement cap with the same pressure setting. Never use other caps except for short-term emergencies!
A belt-driven fan blade for pulling air through the Volvo radiator is usually on the Volvo water pump pulley and should have a fan clutch to control it. The fan clutch allows the fan to turn with the belt at low engine speed and "free-wheel" at higher speeds. A bad fan clutch either doesn't allow the fan to spin at low speed (overheating in traffic) or doesn't allow it to free-wheel at high speed (potential overheating on highway or reduced gas mileage).
An electric fan can be either by itself (usually front-wheel drive) or auxiliary (used with a mechanical fan). Both types are controlled via a temperature sensor - in the Volvo radiator or upper Volvo radiator hose or on the Volvo thermostat or Volvo water pump housing. This sensor is usually an on/off type switch with a fixed temperature setting. (Some vehicles may have 2-3 settings for multi-speed fans.) This sensor is commonly called an "auxilliary fan switch".
Other common temperature sensors are: 1) gauge sender (variable output); 2) warning light sender (on/off type); 3) lambda and/or fuel injection sensor(s) (variable to control fuel injection settings); 4) thermo-time switch (cold start valve control). Your Volvo may have other sensors as well.
Temperature control is critical to both performance and emission control. Unfortunately, this system is the most difficult to troubleshoot without proper equipment and diagrams. It's even more difficult with computers that adjust timing, idle speed, vacuum and fuel delivery automatically to make up for potentially faulty temperature sensor signals.
Maintenance of your cooling system sensors is virtually impossible since there's nothing really to "maintain". Keeping them clean both internally (coolant replacement) and externally (engine cleaning) is the best way to ensure trouble-free driving. Checking and replacing all parts at the factory-recommended time or mileage limits helps as well

Jul 23, 2009 | 2001 Volvo S40

2 Answers

Oil in radiator, car did not overheat


The oil cooler tank on the side of the radiator has cracked and allowed oil into the cooling system. Replace the radiator and you will need to flush the cooling system A LOT. and be careful driving it for a while, the mixture can take a long time to clear out of the head which can cause it to overheat.

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