Question about 1994 Volkswagen Golf

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Car is heating up? I checked the plastic spherical object and liquid is at max!. The oil is a little low could this be the cause of the temperature gauge rising above 90?

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  • Anonymous Sep 02, 2008

    were is the thermostat

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If u mean u added less than litre of oil, then no, it ain't the cause. If u put 3 litres, then maybe so.
Might wanna check to make sure ur radiator is fine. If there's no "mesh" on it, then it can't cool properly.

2nd, make sure ur fan turns on. The thermostat is located within the water pump and can't really be checked without replacing water pump, but on VW's thermostats RARELY break down.

How long have u had the car?

Posted on Sep 05, 2008

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Yes it can be. Might be something else, but could be the oil. Change the oil with Castrol 10w40 and add Lucas additive and see if there are any changes. Also check the thermostat. Make sure your fan is turning.

Posted on Jul 24, 2008

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Hi I'm having this message, 'low oil pressure' when temp go to suitable temperature my car Peugeot 407


The engine bearing clearances expand with heat which, if excessive, will lower the oil pressure. The spring in the pressure regulator in the oil pump will cause the pressure to drop for the same reason. A partially plugged oil intake screen will work in conjunction with the oil pump to cause it too.

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How do i find out whats causing my car to overheat


How to Troubleshoot an Overheating Engine By Deanna Sclar from Auto Repair For Dummies, 2nd Edition
1 of 9 in Series: The Essentials of Checking and Maintaining Your Vehicle's Cooling System The first sign of a vehicle overheating is either when the needle on the temperature gauge pushes its way into the ominous red zone or the "Check Engine" or "Temperature" malfunction indicator light on the dashboard casts a sinister glow. Left alone, the liquid in the radiator eventually boils over, and steam rolls out from under the hood.
If your vehicle overheats often and constantly loses coolant, the problem may be leaks in your cooling system. If your vehicle overheats in normal weather and traffic, you may need to add liquid to the system, replace the thermostat, adjust or replace the accessory belt, or check the water pump.
The first thing to check if your vehicle overheats often is the pressure cap. Sometimes the gasket on the cap deteriorates and lets pressure escape, which causes the cooling system to malfunction. Most service stations can test your cap for you and tell you whether it's in good condition.
Some overheating problems aren't related to the cooling system at all. Here are some other circumstances that can cause a vehicle to overheat:
  • Late timing: If your ignition system is malfunctioning, late timing may be causing your vehicle to overheat because the spark plugs are firing the fuel/air mixture after the piston moves back down from the top of its stroke. Late timing alone doesn't cause an engine to overheat by more than a few degrees, but when coupled with other problems, it can bring the engine temperature to a critical point. Have a service facility place your vehicle on an electronic diagnostic machine to check your timing and adjust it if necessary.
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  • Slipping accessory belt: If you can see and reach the accessory belt that drives the water pump, check to be sure that there's no more than about 1?2 inch of give. If the belt seems loose or frayed, you can try to replace it. If you can't do the job, have a professional deal with it.
  • Collapsing bottom radiator hose: Occasionally, a bottom radiator hose begins to collapse under the vacuum that the water pump creates, and the impaired circulation causes overheating.
  • Low oil level: A vehicle that's low on oil tends to overheat because the oil removes from 75 to 80 percent of the "waste heat" in your engine (in addition to doing its other job of cushioning the moving engine parts).
If you're one quart low in oil and your vehicle holds five quarts, the oil will carry away 20 percent less heat than it should.
Under normal circumstances, you can prevent overheating by checking the level of liquid in the system and maintaining it properly.

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2001 nissan x trial is overheating even if you make switch on.


????? switch on .cars overheat when low on coolant , the thermostat fails or the water pump fails or the head gasket blows the fan does the cooling otherwise

May 24, 2015 | Nissan XTrail Cars & Trucks

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2001 Oldsmobile Silhouette...Overheating, changed the thermostat, no signs of leaking, and the oil looks fine. At idle it takes 20 minutes to max the temperature gauge (red) and while driving it take


Usually the problem with no heat and overheating is low coolant, thermostat, or a faulty water pump impeller.
The radiator may not be full of liquid coolant, or the pump may not be moving the coolant thru the block.

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1 Answer

How do i check a volvo 850 turbo's transmission fluid? do i have engine running? off? in park or neutral? thanks


Check the oil level as follows:

Park the car on a level surface with the engine idling . Slowly move the gear selector lever through all the shift positions and then to position P. Wait 3 minutes before checking the oil level.
As the illustration shows, the dipstick has a COLD and a HOT side. The oil level should between the MIN and MAX marks. Wipe the dipstick with a clean cloth.

WARNING! The oil may be very hot.



Do not use rags that could leave lint on the dipstick. The transmission is topped up via the dipstick tube. The space between the MIN and MAX marks on the dipstick corresponds to 0.5 US qt. (0.5 liter). Do not fill the transmission with too much oil, since this can result in oil being ejected from the transmission. Too little oil, on the other hand, can negatively affect transmission operation, particularly in very cold weather.

A Cold transmission: oil temperature 105° F (40° C). This is a normal temperature for the transmission after idling for about 10 minutes. At oil temperatures below 105° F (40° C), the level may be below the MIN mark.
B Warm transmission: oil temperature 169° F (80° C). This temperature after driving for about 30 minutes. At oil temperatures above 190° F (90° C), the level may be above the MAX mark.

Fluid type: ATF Dexron IIE and Mercon.

May 28, 2011 | Volvo 850 Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

Oil pressure or temperature can cause overheating problem?


Low oil level can cause an engine to run hot but the pressure must be extremely now for that to cause a rise in operating temperature. Naturally, if the temperature is high on the guage, the engine is already overheating, and there are a multitude of reasons why an engine could overheat, from silly things like low tyre pressures to low coolant levels and water leaks. If you like, come back with some more specific information and lets see if we can put a finger on your problem.

Mar 04, 2011 | 1998 Cadillac Catera

3 Answers

Having trouble with my kia carnival over heating, now my heaters in car are no longer working, what could this mean?


my kia carnival 2002 keeps less heating when the car is in slow speed & when it is fast at 100 KM/H the RPM comes down, there is gear oil at Max & engine oil at max and water is getting low. with this i replaced thermostat, have had radiator pressure tested and was fine, radiator water is full but coolant box is getting empty whilst driving the distance of 100 kms. also when it begins to little overheat or just taking off the speed there is a loud ascending rattling noise which seems to come from the under right side of engine But when it catches the speed everything is smooth. & then you park for an hour the coolant tank is empty.or at low. please tell me what to do.

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2 Answers

''does a new radiator need refrigerant added to it''


You need to replace the condensor, then take it to a shop to have the a/c system evacuated and recharged to purge moisture because the system was opened. That will cost around $150. You do not need to replace the receiver/dryer/suction accumulator even though they will tell you that you do.
go to car-part.com to find prices of condensor from salvage yards. Page with asterisk on it is the lowest priced part.

--------------------------------------
The Refrigerant Cycle
During stabilized conditions (air conditioning system shutdown), the refrigerant is in a vaporized state and pressures are equal throughout the system. When the A/C compressor (19703) is in operation it increases pressure on the refrigerant vapor, raising its temperature. The high-pressure and high-temperature vapor is then released into the top of the A/C condenser core (19712).
The A/C condenser core, being close to ambient temperature, causes the refrigerant vapor to condense into a liquid when heat is removed from the refrigerant by ambient air passing over the fins and tubing. The now liquid refrigerant, still at high pressure, exits from the bottom of the A/C condenser core and enters the inlet side of the A/C evaporator core orifice (19D990).
The A/C evaporator core orifice is the restriction in the refrigerant system that creates the high pressure buildup in the A/C evaporator core (19860) and separates the high and low pressure sides of the A/C system. As the liquid refrigerant leaves this restriction, its pressure and boiling point are reduced.
The liquid refrigerant is now at its lowest pressure and temperature. As it passes through the A/C evaporator core, it absorbs heat from the passenger compartment airflow passing over the plate/fin sections of the A/C evaporator core. This addition of heat causes the refrigerant to boil (convert to gas). The now cooler passenger compartment air can no longer support the same humidity level of the warmer air and this excess moisture condenses on the exterior of the evaporator coils and fins and drains outside the vehicle.
The suction accumulator/drier (19C836) is designed to remove moisture from the refrigerant and to prevent any liquid refrigerant that may not have been vaporized in the A/C evaporator core from reaching the A/C compressor. The A/C compressor is designed to pump refrigerant vapor only, as liquid refrigerant will not compress and can damage the A/C compressor.
The refrigerant cycle is now repeated with the A/C compressor again increasing the pressure and temperature of the refrigerant.
The A/C cycling switch (19E561) interrupts compressor operation before the external temperature of the A/C evaporator core gets low enough to cause the condensed water vapor (excess humidity) to turn to ice. It does this by monitoring low side line pressure. It is known that a refrigerant pressure of approximately 210 kPa (30 psi) will yield an operating temperature of 0°C (32°F). The A/C cycling switch controls system operation in an effort to maintain this temperature.
The high side line pressure is also monitored so that A/C compressor operation can be interrupted if system pressure becomes too high.
The A/C compressor pressure relief valve (19D644) will open and vent refrigerant to relieve unusually high system pressure.
Clutch Cycling Orifice Tube Type Refrigerant System 75cc8eb.gif
Item Part Number Description 1 19E762 A/C charge valve port (low side) 2 19E561 A/C cycling switch 3 19C836 Suction accumulator/drier 4 19703 A/C compressor 5 19D644 A/C compressor pressure relief valve 6 19D594 A/C pressure cut-off switch 7 19E762 A/C charge valve port (high side) 8 19712 A/C condenser core 9 19D990 A/C evaporator core orifice 10 19860 A/C evaporator core 11 — Low pressure vapor 12 — High pressure vapor 13 — Low pressure liquid 14 — High pressure liquid

  1. Connect the R-134a A/C Refrigerant Center to the low- and high-pressure service gauge port valves.
  2. Evacuate the system until the low-pressure gauge reads at least 99.4 kPa (29.5 in-Hg) (vacuum) and as close as 101.1 kPa (30 in-Hg) as possible. Continue to operate the vacuum pump for a minimum of 45 minutes.
  3. Turn off the evacuation pump. Observe the low-pressure gauge for five minutes to make sure that the system vacuum is held. If vacuum is not held for five minutes, leak-test the system, service the leaks, and evacuate the system again.
  4. Correctly oil match the system to verify that the correct amount of refrigerant oil is present in the system. For additional information, refer to Refrigerant Oil Adding in this section.
  5. Charge the system with the specified weight of refrigerant and refrigerant oil.
  6. When no more refrigerant is being drawn into the system, start the engine and select MAX A/C operation. Set the blower motor speed to maximum and allow the remaining refrigerant to be drawn into the system. Continue to add refrigerant into the system until the specified weight of R-134a has been added. Close the charging cylinder valve and allow the system to pull any remaining refrigerant from the hose. When the suction pressure drops to approximately 207 kPa (30 psi), close the charging hose valve.

May 14, 2009 | 1995 Nissan Maxima

2 Answers

Heater temperature does not stay hot


1st thing to check is the coolant level. I've seen cars w/ no heat, or very little quite a few times caused by low level in cooling system--not low enough to overheat the engine, but enough that circulation of coolant to heater core is affected (no or little hot coolant circulation to heater core=no or little heat),
Is the engine temp gauge in the normal range? If it's in the low range, engine not reaching operating temp. it could be caused by a thermostat stuck in the open position (or no thermostat, sometimes people remove them when their car overheats, and this should not be done).
Here's how the system works: the heater 'box' contains a heater core (a mini radiator) w/ a fan and hoses connecting the heater core to the engine cooling system. Hot engine coolant is circulated thru the heater core. When u activate the heat switch on the dash, a flap door opens to expose the heater box to the passenger compartment. The fan switch on the dash activates the fan, which blows air thru the core, which heats the air.
So, if it's not the coolant level at the radiator, the fan is obviously working, the engine is reaching operating temperature, I would say it must be the flap door that opens, isn't opening fully, or isn't staying open. It could be the dash switch is defective (not supplying current to open flap door) or less likely the flap door is binding somehow. Hope it's as simple as correcting coolant level, if not, the dash switch control should be checked

Oct 22, 2008 | 2004 Dodge Caravan

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