Question about Volkswagen Cabriolet

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Coil will not produce spark, I have already replaced teh electronic ignition control unit located in the engine compartment. Thanks Steve

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There are lots of factors but my first suspects is the Crank Sensor, have you checked this?

Posted on Jul 24, 2008

  • marlon john madrid
    marlon john madrid Jul 24, 2008

    this is very close to your sparks issue too, i read the post bu SCI as it can be a great diagnossi to know what is the issue on the VW



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I need help locating a module ignition modulator in a 2003 Chevy Tahoe


Who told you that one ? Module ignition modulator 2003 Chevy Tahoe ! No such thing! Your best bet would be to take your vehicle to a qualified repair shop .
The electronic ignition (EI) system is responsible for producing and controlling a high energy secondary spark. This spark is used to ignite the compressed air/fuel mixture at precisely the correct time. This provides optimal performance, fuel economy, and control of exhaust emissions. This ignition system consists of a separate ignition coil connected to each spark plug by a short secondary wire. The driver modules within each coil assembly are commanded ON/OFF by the powertrain control module (PCM). The PCM primarily uses engine speed and position information from the crankshaft and camshaft position (CMP) sensors to control the sequence, dwell, and timing of the spark.

Aug 09, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

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Any opinions on what's better electronic ignition or points .what are the pros and cons to both of any


electronic ignition will beat points hands down any time
to understand this you will need an explanation of how each works.
with a points system there are a set of points , a condenser and a coil
when the points are closed the current flows through the coil windings and produces a field flux
when the points open this field id collapsed and that produces the high voltage for the spark ( understand that current has mass and when the points open the current still flows and that is absorbed in the condenser-- that continuing current flow acts like an arc welder and burns the points )
to make this collapse happen faster the condenser back feeds current through the coil windings and so the voltage is boosted from 12 volts to around 17,000 volts
This relative low voltage induces a high current flow which over a short operating time burns the center electrode of plugs away , requiring frequent plug gap adjustments and plug replacements
problems associated with points include
point gap constantly closing from the wear block being worn away
point bounce at high rpms
coil flux saturation falling off at high rpms reducing the intensity of the spark
water and moisture in the distributor causing loss of spark
on the other hand with electronic ignition there is no points to
get wet
bounce
close up
no condenser to fail
points burn
the electronic system works on a much lower voltage ( 5-7 volts) and a pulse that initiates the action in an electronic circuit that is controlled by transistors and capacitors
This allows for a more rapid increase and decrease in the coil field flux and that increases the voltage to the vicinity of 60,000 volts
this reduces the current across the plug gap and that results in longer plug life and no change in plug gap settings ( EFI systems using quality plugs will never need changing of the plugs from electrode loss)
as electronic systems are sealed there is no problem from water as there is with points , although the same problem remains with moisture in the distributor cap
Now we have a low voltage spark with high current flow to ignite the mixture against a very high voltage with low current flow to do the job
to make it even better some electronic systems will actually continue a series of sparks so that the flame in the mixture is continually being ignited as against the one spark from a points system ( the air fuel mixture is not static but continually rotates -swirls in the combustion chamber)
what does this mean
better economy at higher rpms
better burn rate of the mixture producing power for all of the power stroke
smaller coils
with ECM units that control the ignition , it also controls the ignition timing according to rpms , and throttle setting and mixture setting reducing the need to alter the spark timing for different fuel octane ratings and altitude conditions as it is done automatically to suit the reports from all the sensors
So as I said
electronic system win hands down over points every time

Jun 14, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Where is the coil pack located on 2002 f250 and what does it look like ?


What size engine ? 5.4 L ? Your truck has coil on plug ignition system ! Has eight individual coils on top of spark plugs , center top of valve cover ..

The 5.4L and 6.8L engines are equipped with a coil on plug ignition system. This system has a separate ignition coil mounted on each spark plug. Operation of the coils is controlled by the powertrain control module (PCM) (12A650), which computes ignition timing based on inputs from the electronic engine control system sensors. For additional information on sensor inputs related to ignition control; refer to Section 303-14A .

Aug 14, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have no spark for 91 grand am. ignition control module or ignition coil?


You have 3 coils located on top of the ignition module with 2 spark plug wires to each. Usually on that vehicle only one coil dies at once. But if you have no spark at all the ignition module would be the usual problem. There are a couple other unlikely things that can also cause this problem but it will require a repair shop to diagnosis them.

Feb 06, 2013 | 1991 Pontiac Grand Am

1 Answer

My 99 s10 2.2l 5spd will start fine when its cold out, but when it warms up it will have trouble starting i usually have to keep turning it over for a few seconds before it will even crank ive already...


Ignition control module or the coil connection, When the engine is cold,there is less resistance that electron needs to overcome.,Right at the location where you replaced spark plug wire where the coils sit is the ignition control module,Any poor connection in that are would result in your description.

Apr 25, 2011 | Chevrolet S 10 Cars & Trucks

4 Answers

There is no spark thus car won't start. the battery is fine, it turns over good, it is not flooded, the spark plugs are new, the ignition coil was just replaced, what else controls the spark


The Crankshaft Position Sensor and the Ignition Control Module also control the spark. It depends on whether your vehicle is equipped with the 2.2L engine or the 2.4L engine as to where these components are located and what they look like.

Jan 29, 2011 | 1996 Chevrolet Cavalier

1 Answer

My 92 dakota is not getting any spark


Engine Fails To Start

The "Checking For Spark'' test should be performed prior to this test.

This is a basic test of the ignition system that systematically examines the battery, the coil, the engine controller, and its wiring harness and connections; the most likely culprits in a no-start condition at this stage.
88472304.gif

Fabricate this special jumper with a 0.33 MF capacitor in-line to test the ignition coil
Click to Enlarge

  1. Unplug the ignition coil harness connector at the coil.
  2. Connect a set of small jumper wires (18 gauge or smaller) between the disconnected harness terminals and the ignition coil terminals.
88472314.gif

Terminal locations on the engine controller 14-way connector-1989 models
Click to Enlarge 88472305.gif

Engine controller 60-way connector-relevant terminals for testing are shown numbered
Click to Enlarge

  1. Attach one lead of a a voltmeter to the positive (12V) jumper wire. Attach the negative side of the voltmeter to a good ground. Measure the voltage at the battery and confirm that enough current is available to operate the starting and ignition systems.
  2. Crank the engine for five seconds while monitoring the voltage at the coil positive terminal:
    1. If the voltage remains at zero, diagnosis of the fuel system should be performed. Also check the engine controller and auto shutdown relay.
    2. If voltage is at or near battery voltage and then drops to zero after one or two seconds of engine cranking, check the engine control module circuit.

WARNING

The ignition must be turned OFF prior to unplugging the engine controller connector. If it is not, electrical surging could occur causing damage to the unit or other electrical components in the vehicle.

  1. If the voltage remains at or near battery voltage during the entire five seconds, turn the ignition key OFF. Remove the 14-way connector on 1989 models, or the 60-way connector on 1990-96 models at the engine controller. Check the 14-way or 60-way connector for any spread terminals.
  1. Remove the test lead from the coil positive terminal. Connect an 18 gauge jumper wire between the battery positive terminal and the coil positive terminal.
  2. Make a special jumper cable (see illustration). Using the jumper MOMENTARILY ground terminal 12 on the 14-way connector (1989), or terminal 19 (see illustration) of the 1990-96 60-way connector. A spark should be generated at the coil wire when the ground is removed.
    1. If a spark is generated, replace the engine controller computer.
    2. If no spark is seen, use the special jumper to ground the coil negative terminal directly. If spark is produced, repair the wiring harness for an open circuit condition. If spark is not produced, replace the ignition coil
    this is for distributor ignition
THIS IS TESTING OF DISTRIBUTORLESS IGN
Testing

This procedure requires an ohmmeter to test the coil packs for primary and secondary resistance (specifications are given for an ambient temperature of 70-80°F/21-27°C).
88472320.gif

The two coil packs contain five independent coils, which fire paired cylinders (shown numbered)
Click to Enlarge

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Determine the manufacturer of the coil. It should be labeled either a Diamond or Toyodenso.
88472779.gif

Location of critical terminals for checking the coil primary resistance-V10 engine front coils
Click to Enlarge 88472780.gif

Location of critical terminals for checking the coil primary resistance-V10 engine rear coils
Click to Enlarge

  1. Check the secondary resistance of each individual paired coil by connecting an ohmmeter across the coil towers. This must be done between the correct cylinder pairs: 3/2, 7/4, 1/6, 9/8, or 5/10. Resistance for a Diamond coil should be 11,300-15,300 ohms. For a Toyodenso manufactured coil pack, resistance should be 11,300-13,300 ohms.
88472323.gif

Use an ohmmeter to check secondary resistance as shown

  1. Check the primary resistance of the front coil pack by attaching an ohmmeter between the B+ coil terminal and either the right (cylinders 3/2), center (cylinder 7/4), or left coil (cylinders 1/6) terminals. Resistance for a Diamond coil should be 0.97-1.18 ohms. Resistance for a Toyodenso coil should be 0.95-1.20 ohms.
  2. To test the primary resistance of the rear coil pack, attach an ohmmeter between the B+ coil terminal (see illustration) and either the right (cylinders 9/8), or left (cylinders 5/10) coil terminals. Resistance for a Diamond coil should be 0.97-1.18 ohms. Resistance for a Toyodenso coil should be 0.95-1.20 ohms.
i hope this helps any more questions repl if help at all plz vote or comment me

Jan 17, 2011 | 1995 Dodge Dakota

1 Answer

I have 95 talon esi . got spark to coil coil is new changed crank positioning sensor still no spark what next


Dear Sir,
As you saying you have replaced ignition coil and crank sensor, next is check relay fro ignition system in fuse box replace relay with other one for testing purpose only, if no change then next,if you can check continuity of all wire form Engine Control Unit to Ignition coil, if all wire are ok then replace Engine Control Unit (ECM) if any wire found no contunity please reconnect same wire or repair wire it will solve problem if not then you have to replace ECM. thanks.

Oct 26, 2010 | 1993 Eagle Talon

1 Answer

I just install an engine in a 1999 safari i cant get it running there is no spark from the distributor


For distributor/ coil ignition; Check the following;
1 Check if you have the spark at the plugs. Broken
plugs do not produce sparks at the center contacts
Replace as needed.
2 Check your ignition coils if this is still O.K. The coil
supplies the spark plug thru the distributor, to make
the spark, and make the engine run.
Assuming all the defects are already connected, restart your engine, and send in your e-mail.

Oct 11, 2009 | 2000 GMC Safari

4 Answers

No spark at plugs . Engine won't start, check fuel first, getting plenty. Then check for spark, no spark.


Have you checked your plug wires to see that are tight? The plug wire may need replaced.

Aug 21, 2009 | 1994 Buick LeSabre

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