Question about 1995 Mitsubishi Eclipse

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Car has been parked in the same spot with a dead battery for a year, looking to put it back on the road. What maintenance besides new fluids should I look into. Was told the time belt may be a wise decision, considering it has sat for a year and it has 81000 miles on it. Any feedback is much appreciated.

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A radiator flush and an oil change also check all plug wires and change spark plugs and me personally i would buy a new battery so basically a tune up and a battery

Posted on Nov 24, 2008

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Its only been a year! charge battery,check fluids,check air filter, make sure there are no mouse nests or chewed wires and then just run it

Posted on Jul 22, 2008

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When i start my car and go to put it in gear it wont move.


When you say rocky spot, what do you mean? If you mean there were rocks in the roadway, you could have put a small hole in the transmission pan which leaked all the fluid out of it. First thing I would do is check the fluid level on the transmission dipstick and look for leaks on the ground under the car.

May 01, 2015 | 2002 Ford Taurus

Tip

Your vehicle's routine maintenance schedule


Reasons to perform routine Preventive Maintenance on your vehicle

Preventive Maintenance is a schedule of planned maintenance actions aimed at the prevention of breakdowns and failures. The primary goal of preventive maintenance is to help prolong the life of the vehicle and reduce vehicle failures therefore providing a worry free driving experience. Automotive technicians say the key to keeping vehicles running well today and down the road, is routine preventive maintenance. Many drivers tend to stall when it comes to keeping up with some everyday automotive basics. Maintenance

A recent survey by the Car Care Council found:

* 38 percent of cars had low or dirty engine oil.
* 54 percent had low tire pressure.
* 28 percent had inadequate cooling protection.
* 19 percent needed new belts.
* 16 percent had dirty air filters.
* 10 percent had low or contaminated brake fluid.
Some of the most important preventive maintenance steps you can do yourself and save you some time and money. Here is a quick list of some of the most common preventive maintenance steps that you should be able to handle yourself.
Airfilter: Check it every month. Replace it when it becomes dirty or as part of a tune -up. It is easy to reach, right under the big metal 'lid', in a carbureted engine; or in a rectangular box at the forward end of the air in a duct hose assembly.
Battery: Extreme caution should be taken while handling a battery since it can produce explosive gases. It is advisable not to smoke, create a spark or light a match near a battery. Always wear protective glasses and gloves.
Belts: Inspect belts and hoses smoothly. Replace glazed, worn or frayed belts. Replace bulging, rotten or brittle hoses and tighten clamps. If a hose looks bad, or feels too soft or too hard, it should be replaced.
Brake Fluid: Check the brake fluid monthly. First wipe dirt from the brake master cylinder reservoir lid. Pry off the retainer clip and remove the lid or unscrew the plastic lid, depending on which type your vehicle has. If you need fluid, add the improved type and check for possible leaks throughout the system. Do not overfill.
Engine Oil; Check the oil after every fill up. Remove the dipstick, wipe it clean. Insert it fully and remove it again. If it is low, add oil. To maintain peak performance, the oil should be changed every 3,000 miles or 3 months, whichever comes first. Replace the oil filter with every oil change.
Exhaust: Look underneath for loose or broken exhaust clamps and supports. Check for holes in muffler or pipes. Replace the rusted or damaged parts. Have the emission checked at once per year for compliance with local laws.
Hoses: Inspect the hoses and belts monthly. If a hose looks bad, or feels too soft or too hard, it should be replaced.
Lights: Make sure that all your lights are clean and working, including the brake lights, turn signals and emergency flashers. Keep spare bulbs and fuses in your vehicle.
Oil Filter: To maintain peak performance, change oil every 3 months or 3,000 kms whichever comes first. Replace oil filter with every oil change.
Power Steering Fluid: Check the power steering fluid level once per month. Check it by removing the reservoir dipstick. If the level is down, add fluid and inspect the pump and hoses for leaks.
Shock Absorbers: Look for signs of oil seepage on shock absorbers, test shock action by bouncing the car up and down. The car should stop bouncing when you step back. Worn or leaking shocks should be replaced. Always replace shock absorbers in pairs.
Tires: Keep tires inflated to recommended pressure. Check for cuts, bulges and excessive tread wear. Uneven wear indicates tires are misaligned or out of balance.
Transmission Fluid: Check transmission fluid monthly with engine warm and running, and the parking brake on. Shift to drive, then to park. Remove dipstick, wipe dry, insert it and remove it again. Add the approved type fluid, if needed. Never overfill.
Washer Fluid: Keep the windshield washer fluid reservoir full. Use some of it to clean off the wiper blades.
Wiper Blades: Inspect the windscreen wiper blades whenever you clean your windshield. Do not wait until the rubber is worn or brittle to replace them. They should be replaced at least once per year, and more often if smearing occurs. Remember, preventive maintenance is easy and you will benefit from it in the long run by saving yourself time and money at the repair shop.

on Dec 11, 2009 | Ford Explorer Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

1996 Dodge Stratus. The power steering fluid is full but its hard to turn the wheel from start, once you are on the road turns are easy. Seems like there is no power steering when you are parked trying t...


Start the car and take the cap off of the fluid reservoir. Does it look like the fluid is moving in the reservoir or is the fluid very still? If the fluid is very still will most likely need a pump

Mar 09, 2015 | Dodge Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Wont start


I had a similar problem a few months ago. Ready to get major engine work done, got fire, timing was right, getting gas.....
An experienced mechanic asked where the car had been parked and how long. I had parked it in grass, over a wet spot. The battery was dead too. He told me to park it over a warm spot for a few days and try a new battery. Did that, with the hood open, replaced the battery, and it fired right up. Something about being too damp and/or the voltage in the battery was too weak.. All I know is it worked, and I drive it every day and don't park in wet grassy spots.

Mar 02, 2013 | 2000 Mazda MPV

1 Answer

Replace voltage regulator 2000 suburban 1500


You don't say what year your truck is but since the 70's the alternator and voltage regulator are housed together. Use a voltmeter to check the output from the alternator to a good battery when running it should be putting out 13-14 volts if not there is your problem.

Jan 17, 2013 | Chevrolet Suburban 1500 Cars & Trucks

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Cant get my car out of park. 2005 kia rio


BRAKE LIGHT SWITCH FAULTY OR TRANSMISSION NEUTRAL SAFETY SWITCH COULD BE BAD.

Oct 30, 2011 | 2005 Kia Rio

1 Answer

So I picked up a 2006 mini last year and I noticed in the last couple of months that the overflow tank goes empty every couple of days. I hadn't noticed anything on the ground until I had my oil...


Start on a day you're not using the car. park it in a spot where any fluid leaks will be imeadiately obvious and if you see a fluid leak jack the vehicle on the spot and get under it and start looking for wet spots. It could be something as simple as a bad or loose hose clamp.

Jun 24, 2011 | 2006 Mini Cooper

1 Answer

Cars battery was dead after jump starting the car


The cold air is not related to the battery trouble.

I order for your car to MAKE electricity, there must be some power in the battery. If your battery is dead, when you jump it, you can run the starter motor but if you dont put electricity back into the battery, the alternator will not make power. And ... you have the blower on consuming any power that might be remaining in the poor battery.

You might need a new battery and you might need a new alternator in your 15 year old Park Avenue.

Thank your for your interest in FixYa.com

Mar 01, 2010 | 1995 Buick Park Avenue

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