Question about 1999 Dodge Durango

1 Answer

I have a 2000dodge durango that i changed transmission fluid filters andput a new gasket seal in ..I put in the recommended chrysler atf fluid but it will not move either forward or backwards..

Posted by on

  • 1 more comment 
  • Anonymous Sep 16, 2008

    1998 durango wont change gear after take off, revs and RPM goes to RED zone. Remains in 1st gear when it should change .

  • Anonymous Mar 12, 2014

    a 2002 Buick Rendezvous FWD transmission fluid change how much fluid do I need? I also discover a leakgage, do I change the gasket as I am about to change the ATF filter?

  • Anonymous Mar 12, 2014

    a 2002 Buick Rendezvous FWD transmission fluid change how much fluid do I need? I also discovered leakage, do I change the gasket and pan as I am about to change the ATF filter?

×

1 Answer

You didn't get enough fluid in it. Check the dipstick while the truck is Running.

Posted on Aug 31, 2008

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

Just wanted to know how to change transmission oil.


Hello,

Before You change the transmission oil, You need to check if it is due for changing. To check the transmission oil. please follow the steps below:
  1. Open the hood and locate the transmission dipstick. It is in front of the engine on the left side, just behind the radiator cap.
  2. Pull the ring on top of the dipstick to remove it from its tube. Wipe it off with the paper towel and replace it. This will ensure an accurate reading.
  3. Remove the dipstick again an look at the markings at the tip. If the fluid on the stick is below the full line, add more transmission fluid.
  4. Repeat this procedure until the fluid reaches the correct level on the dipstick.

There are different types of engine therefore there are several ways to change their transmission fluid. Unless you got something in there via dipstick its really not necessary to ever change the ATF. It's a messy job because there's no drain plug to change the fluid, but You can do it yourself if you're so inclined. To change the fluid,

  1. You have to get under your vehicle and remove the pan from the bottom of the transmission.
  2. When you loosen the pan, fluid will start to dribble out in all directions so you need a fairly large catch pan. You should also know that removing the pan doesn't drain all of the old fluid out of the transmission. Approximately a third of the old fluid will still be in the torque converter. There's no drain plug on the converter so you're really only doing a partial fluid change. Even so, a partial fluid change is better than no fluid change at all.
  3. A typical fluid change will require anywhere from 3 to 6 quarts of ATF depending on the application, a new filter and a pan gasket (or RTV sealer) for the transmission pan. The pan must be thoroughly cleaned prior to reinstallation. This includes wiping all fluid residue from the inside of the pan and scraping all traces of the old gasket from the pan's sealing surface. Don't forget to clean the mounting flange on the transmission, too.
  4. When the new filter is installed, be sure it is mounted in the exact same position as the original and that any O-rings or other gaskets have been properly positioned prior to tightening the bolts. Then tighten the bolts to the manufacturer's recommended specs.
  5. When refilling the transmission with fresh fluid, be careful not to allow any dirt or debris to enter the dipstick tube. Using a long-neck funnel with a built-in screen is recommended.
  6. Do not overfill the transmission. Too much fluid can cause the fluid to foam, which in turn can lead to erratic shifting, oil starvation and transmission damage. Too much fluid may also force ATF to leak past the transmission seals.
  7. Add half a quart at a time until the dipstick shows full. The transmission really isn't full yet because the dipstick should be checked when the fluid is hot, and the engine is idling with the gear selector in Park. So start the engine, drive the vehicle around the block, then recheck the fluid level while the engine is idling and add fluid as needed until the dipstick reads full.
Hope this helped. Thank You for using FixYa!!!

Jan 27, 2011 | Lexus IS Cars & Trucks

4 Answers

What kind of transmission fluid does a 2006 PT cruiser use


Hello there
Your manufacture recommends
Coastal ATF+4 is formulated for Chrysler automatic transmssions where ATF+, ATF+2, ATF+3 or ATF+4 is recommended.
  • Improves low temperature fluidity and viscosity breakdown performance
  • Formulated to give full protection in Chrsyler transmission operation
  • Anti-shudder durability
  • Recommended and licensed for all transmissions that call for ATF+4 fluid

Jan 23, 2011 | 2006 Chrysler PT Cruiser

2 Answers

Changing transmission fluid


Hello,

changing transmission fluid a messy job because there's no drain plug to change the fluid, but you can do it yourself if you're so inclined. To change the fluid, you have to get under your vehicle and remove the pan from the bottom of the transmission.
When you loosen the pan, fluid will start to dribble out in all directions so you need a fairly large catch pan. You should also know that removing the pan doesn't drain all of the old fluid out of the transmission. Approximately a third of the old fluid will still be in the torque converter. There's no drain plug on the converter so you're really only doing a partial fluid change. Even so, a partial fluid change is better than no fluid change at all.
A typical fluid change will require anywhere from 3 to 6 quarts of ATF depending on the application, a new filter and a pan gasket (or RTV sealer) for the transmission pan. The pan must be thoroughly cleaned prior to reinstallation. This includes wiping all fluid residue from the inside of the pan and scraping all traces of the old gasket from the pan's sealing surface. Don't forget to clean the mounting flange on the transmission, too.
When the new filter is installed, be sure it is mounted in the exact same position as the original and that any O-rings or other gaskets have been properly positioned prior to tightening the bolts. Then tighten the bolts to the manufacturer's recommended specs.
When refilling the transmission with fresh fluid, be careful not to allow any dirt or debris to enter the dipstick tube. Using a long-neck funnel with a built-in screen is recommended.
CAUTION: Do not overfill the transmission. Too much fluid can cause the fluid to foam, which in turn can lead to erratic shifting, oil starvation and transmission damage. Too much fluid may also force ATF to leak past the transmission seals.
Add half a quart at a time until the dipstick shows full. The transmission really isn't full yet because the dipstick should be checked when the fluid is hot, and the engine is idling with the gear selector in Park. So start the engine, drive the vehicle around the block, then recheck the fluid level while the engine is idling and add fluid as needed until the dipstick reads full.

Take care and good luck

Oct 26, 2010 | Toyota MR2 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Where do i put the transmission fluid on a standard mercury cougar?


Hello,

To change the fluid, you have to get under your vehicle and remove the pan from the bottom of the transmission. When you loosen the pan, fluid will start to dribble out in all directions so you need a fairly large catch pan. You should also know that removing the pan doesn't drain all of the old fluid out of the transmission. Approximately a third of the old fluid will still be in the torque converter. There's no drain plug on the converter so you're really only doing a partial fluid change. Even so, a partial fluid change is better than no fluid change at all.
A typical fluid change will require anywhere from 3 to 6 quarts of ATF depending on the application, a new filter and a pan gasket (or RTV sealer) for the transmission pan. The pan must be thoroughly cleaned prior to reinstallation. This includes wiping all fluid residue from the inside of the pan and scraping all traces of the old gasket from the pan's sealing surface. Don't forget to clean the mounting flange on the transmission, too.
When the new filter is installed, be sure it is mounted in the exact same position as the original and that any O-rings or other gaskets have been properly positioned prior to tightening the bolts. Then tighten the bolts to the manufacturer's recommended specs.
When refilling the transmission with fresh fluid, be careful not to allow any dirt or debris to enter the dipstick tube. Using a long-neck funnel with a built-in screen is recommended.

Do not overfill the transmission. Too much fluid can cause the fluid to foam, which in turn can lead to erratic shifting, oil starvation and transmission damage. Too much fluid may also force ATF to leak past the transmission seals.
Add half a quart at a time until the dipstick shows full. The transmission really isn't full yet because the dipstick should be checked when the fluid is hot, and the engine is idling with the gear selector in Park. So start the engine, drive the vehicle around the block, then recheck the fluid level while the engine is idling and add fluid as needed until the dipstick reads full.

Take care and good luck

Oct 13, 2010 | 2001 Mercury Cougar

1 Answer

I just want to know where you add the transmission fluid in a dodge durango? i can't find it


Drive the Durango for 15 to 20 minutes to warm up the transmission fluid. When the fluid is warm, it will drain better and remove more contaminants from the engine. Raise and support the front of the Durango on ramps or jack stands. Place a large drain pan beneath the transmission.

Loosen the transmission pan retaining bolts with a socket wrench. Remove the bolts, but leave one at each of the four corners of the transmission pan. Slowly loosen the remaining bolts a little at a time.Fluid should begin to drain from the seal on the transmission pan. If the pan is stuck, break the seal by gently prying it loose or tapping it with a rubber mallet.

Support the pan with one hand and remove the bolts on one side of the pan. Allow the transmission fluid to drain until it stops. Remove the two last bolts. Remove the pan and drain the rest of the fluid.

Remove the three screws that hold the filter onto the transmission. Note that these screws may be Torx style. Install a new transmission fluid filter.

Clean the transmission pan and the magnet with solvent. Remove the old gasket material from the transmission pan. You may need a scraper to remove it all. Clean the mating surfaces with a lint-free cloth soaked in solvent. Let the pan air dry.

Put the new gasket on the pan and align them. Remove the gasket, apply a few drops of adhesive on the pan and replace the gasket. Realign the gasket before the adhesive dries.

Replace the pan onto the transmission and replace the retaining bolts. Tighten the bolts in a crisscross fashion to 150-inch pounds with a torque wrench. Return the Durango to level ground.




Refill the transmission with new fluid a little at a time, while checking the level often. Continue to add transmission fluid until it passes the "Add" mark on the dipstick, but doesn't pass the "Full" mark.

Start the engine, shift the transmission through all the gears and place the gear selector back in "Park." Recheck the transmission fluid level and add more fluid if needed. Don't overfill the transmission.

Replace the dipstick into the filler tube. Turn off the engine.

Aug 15, 2010 | 1999 Dodge Durango

1 Answer

Need to change the transmission filter how and where is it located


Fluid & Filter Change Under normal service (moderate highway driving excluding excessive hot or cold conditions), the manufacturer feels that automatic transmission fluid should not need periodic changing. However, if a major service is performed to the transmission, if transmission fluid becomes burnt or discolored through severe usage or if the vehicle is subjected to constant stop-and-go driving in hot weather, trailer towing, long periods of highway use at high speeds, fluid should be changed to prevent transmission damage. A preventive maintenance change is therefore recommended for most vehicles at least every 90,000 miles (145,000 km).
Although not a required service, transmission fluid changing can help assure a trouble-free transmission. Likewise, changing the transmission filter at this time is also added insurance.
  1. Raise the car and support it securely on jackstands.
The torque converters on some transmissions are equipped with drain plugs. Because it may take some time to drain the fluid from the converter, you may wish to follow that procedure at this time, then come back to the pan and filter removal.

980822b.gif
Before removing the transmission fluid pan, insure that the area is clean of dirt and debris

2. Place a large drain pan under the transmission.

378093c.gif
Loosen all of the pan attaching bolts to within a few turns of complete removal


  1. Loosen all of the pan attaching bolts to within a few turns of complete removal, then carefully break the gasket seal allowing most of the fluid to drain over the edge of the pan.
CAUTION DO NOT force the pan while breaking the gasket seal. DO NOT allow the pan flange to become bent or otherwise damaged.

  1. When fluid has drained to the level of the pan flange, remove the pan bolts and carefully lower the pan doing your best to drain the rest of the fluid into the drain pan.ea833e6.gif


Once the pan is removed, discard the old gasket and insure that the mating surfaces are clean

9aa0aea.gif
Inspect this magnet inside of the pan for any large pieces of debris. A light gray coating is normal

11c6ddb.gif
Clean the pan thoroughly with a safe solvent and allow it to air dry

5. Clean the transmission oil pan thoroughly using a safe solvent, then allow it to air dry. DO NOT use a cloth to dry the pan which might leave behind bits of lint. Discard the old pan gasket.

22d9261.gif
The transmission filter is secured by a mounting bolt (arrow). Some models may use two bolts

097949a.gif
Remove the filter mounting bolt ...


d9f5189.gif
... then pull the filter free from the transmission

6. If necessary, remove the Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF) filter mounting bolts, then remove the filter by pulling it down and off of the valve body. Make sure any gaskets or seals are removed with the old filter. The transmission usually has one round seal and a rectangular gasket.

7. Install the new oil filter screen making sure all gaskets or seals are in place, then secure using the retaining screws, if applicable.

50f9d74.gif
Install a new pan gasket


8. Place a new gasket on the fluid pan, then install the pan to the transmission. Tighten the attaching bolts to 71-119 inch lbs. (8-13 Nm).

34bd906.gif
Fill the transmission with the proper amount of ATF

9. Add three quarts (six quarts if the torque converter was drained) of fluid to the transmission through the filler tube.
10. Remove the jackstands and carefully lower the vehicle.
11. Start the engine and move the gear selector through all gears in the shift pattern. Allow the engine to reach normal operating temperature.
12. Check the transmission fluid level. Add fluid, as necessary, to obtain the correct level.

Nov 19, 2009 | 1997 Ford Explorer AWD

2 Answers

I have 3.8L the tranny down shifts hard when appling the brakes to stop or slow down. at times it also takes a while for te tranny to engage into reverse.


Check your ATF fluid level. Your MAP lets your TCM know when to shift which in turn tells your solenoid pack to get the fluids flowing in the proper channels. This shifts it down, etc. ...or something very similar to this chain of events. When your fluid level is low, there isn't enough to go through all the channels and you can get air in there- which compresses. This situation causes it to behave just as you described. The jargon aside, you are the proud owner of a very temperamental transmission. Congratulations you lucky guy!
The best thing you can do for your tranny is to keep the fluid clean and full. I would recommend dropping the oil pan of the transmission and then replacing the 4 quarts or so that came out with ATF-4. Do this yourself and it will be better in the long-run. Most shops will put the wrong type of fluid in your transmission and shorten the life of it as well as give you a rough tranny in the meantime.
If you have not performed any transmission service to this vehicle before, I would get a new transmission filter and pan gasket. Also get about 8 quarts of ATF-4 while you are at the parts store. These should all be in stock. You may only use 4 quarts now, but you will want to have some on hand for the next partial change.
This is just as easy as changing your oil- just make sure that nothing has dirt or old gasket material on it when you put it back together. Also, use a new funnel or one that is already designated for ATF when pouring in the new fluids.
If your old fluid is really dark red and burnt smelling, you will need to do the other 4 quarts in 1000 miles.
Make sure you use ATF-4. Your tranny originally came with ATF-3, but Chrysler dicontinued it. ATF-4 is fully synthetic and will work better. Be prepared to pay $4.50-5.50 per quart. The folks at the part store may try and sell you Dexron-III or some other additive nonsense, but don't go for it. Stick to ATF-4 and you won't have issues. The other stuff is thicker and gums up your temperamental tranny. It is not equivalent.
Good luck

PS I am not a mechanic, but I have the same vehicle, have rebuilt my own A604 and also diagnosed and repaired the electrical side of it recently.

Jul 24, 2009 | 1996 Chrysler Town & Country

3 Answers

Automatic transmission


Fluid can leak out of the driveshaft seals, the input shaft seal, the transmission pan gasket, the torque converter or the ATF cooler and line connections. If the fluid level gets low, the transmission may be slow to engage when it is shifted into drive. Gear shifts may be sloppy or delayed, or the transmission may slip between shifts. If the fluid level is really low, the transmission may cause the vehicle to not go at all.fluid level should be checked when the fluid is hot with the engine idling, the parking brake set and the transmission in Park. If fluid is needed, add only enough ATF to bring the level up to the full mark. Do not overfill because doing so can cause the fluid to become aerated, which may affect transmission operation. If the dipstick reads low, the transmission is probably leaking. So look underneath to see where the fluid is going. If there are no visible leaks, check the radiator for ATF in the coolant. The ATF cooler inside the radiator may be leaking and cross-contaminating the fluids.
You should also check the condition of the fluid. Some discoloration and darkening is normal as the fluid ages, but if the ATF is brown or has a burnt smell, it is badly oxidized and needs to be changed. Varnish on the dipstick is another indication of worn out fluid.
You can also do a "blotter test" to check for worn fluid. Place a few drops of ATF on a paper towel and wait 30 seconds. If the spot is widely dispersed and red or light brown in color, the fluid is in satisfactory condition. But if the spot does not spread out and is dark in color, the ATF is oxidized and should be changed.
Many transmission experts say most transmission problems can be prevented by changing the ATF and filter regularly for preventive maintenance. How often depends on how the vehicle is driven. For some vehicles, this might be every 30,000 miles or two years.
The harder the transmission works, the hotter the fluid runs. The life of the fluid drops quickly once its temperature gets up above about 200 degres F. Installing an aftermarket auxiliary ATF cooler that is parallel to the OEM ATF cooler is recommended to keep fluid temperatures down on vehicles that are used for towing or are driven hard.
ATF also becomes contaminated with normal wear particles from the clutch plates, bushings and gears. The filter will trap most of this debris before it can cause problems. But many older Asian transmissions only have a plastic or metal screen that does little to protect the transmission against internal contaminants and nothing to keep the fluid clean. On these vehicles, changing the fluid is the only way to get rid of these contaminants.
When adding or replacing ATF, use the type specified by the vehicle manufacturer. GM, Ford, Chrysler, Honda, Mercedes and others all have their own specs for ATF. There is no such thing as a "universal" ATF that works in all transmissions. Some fluids meet a variety of specifications, but cannot meet them all because of the different friction additives that are required.
Ford has three automatic transmission fluid specifications: Type F (a non-friction modified formula for most 1964-81 transmissions), Mercon (a friction modified ATF similar to Dexron II for 1988-97 transmissions), and Mercon V (Fords latest friction-modified formula, introduced in 1997).

Oct 12, 2008 | 1994 Honda Civic

1 Answer

Transmission fluid change


More than likely, like most automatic transmissions, yours does not have an oil plug. You need to drop the transmission oil pan to drain the old oil... You need to buy a transmission filter/pan gasket kit. The filter is located on the bottom of the tranny. You will see it when you remove the pan. Replace the filter, thoroughly remove any traces of old gasket material, clean the mating surfaces, and reinstall the pan with the new gasket. Torque the pan bolts to the manufacturers spec (you should be able to get this where you buy the filter/gasket kit). Refill the transmission through the dipstick (Capacity for the Voyager is 4 quarts, make sure to use ATF Plus (Type 7176) for your particular tranny, NOT Dexron, Mercon, or generic automatic transmission fluid, Chrysler transmissions do not like any other kind and tend to fail quite quickly with the wrong fluid). Fill to the full cold level. Start the engine, move the shifter through all gear ranges, and put it back in park. Leave the engine running and refill to cold full. Drive the car for 5-10 minutes and, with the engine still running and the car in park, fill to Hot full. You should be ready to go!

Aug 26, 2008 | 1997 Chrysler Town & Country

2 Answers

Flushing the transmission


To change the transmission fluid make sure you have purchased: 1. filter with the o-ring 2. MOPAR ATF + 3 Type 7176, p/n 05010124AA fluid (I believe it took 6 quarts?) You are not changing the torque converter fluid so there will not be 12 quarts needed.). 3. Pan gasket. You should receive the new neoprene reusable pan gasket. This is because the recommendation is to change the transmission fluid every 25,000 miles. 4. There is a fluid additive to prevent foaming? Use it.


Raise the vehicle on a hoist. Remove the pan bolts. Remove the old gasket material with a plastic scraper. There could be metal transfer if you use a metal scraper. Clean the pan carefully. Clean the magnet that sits in the pan as it collects the minute metal shavings. If you see an excess of larger particles, you really should have the transmission inspected at a shop. Replace the filter carefully looking at its arrangement before removing. It took a second look to install a new filter because I did not watch how it was situated before removing. Use a thin coat of transmission fluid on the new pan gasket. Orient reusable gasket properly with bolt holes and assemble oil pan and gasket to transmission case. Tighten oil pan bolts to 19 Nm (165 in lbs.). CAUTION: DO NOT OVERFILL TRANSAXLE. DO NOT ADD OIL IF LEVEL IS BETWEEN: LOWER HOLES FOR WARM OIL (100?F). UPPER HOLES FOR HOT OIL (180?F.).

Jun 12, 2008 | Chrysler Neon Cars & Trucks

Not finding what you are looking for?
1999 Dodge Durango Logo

Related Topics:

243 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Dodge Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

63661 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

21990 Answers

Jeff Turcotte
Jeff Turcotte

Level 3 Expert

6812 Answers

Are you a Dodge Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...