Question about 2001 Nissan Altima

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A/c work for about 1o minutes and then blows hot air. system charged properly, no leaks, a/c machine high and low gauges read good but a/c only works for 1o minutes 97 nissan altima

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I Had the same problem, and is the compressor. There is a coil that when receives 12 volts, it moves to engage the clutch, but as is passes about 10 minutes, that coil stop working, so do the compressor, and the system starts blowing hot air. You have to take out the compressor and get to somebody that can change the coil. It cost in parts about 50 bucks, plus recharge the system with new refrigerant. Don't try other test, just go to the compressor put a tester and mesures the voltage at the wires after the security pressure valve on it.

Posted on Sep 20, 2008

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If you are saying that its charged , check it to make sure that you have the right amount in there. You can actually make snow coming out of the vents for about 3 minutes, if the system is undercharged, than the evaporator freezes and by by cold air. Make sure, that you have the right amount in there first. Sounds to me like something is freezing up, or you have a pinched a/c line.

Posted on Jul 19, 2008

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My 2008 dodge ram temp gauge goes from normal to high ,check gauge lite comes on in a few minutes temp gauge goes back to normal but heater will only blow cold air I,ll shut heater off wait a few minutes...


Souds like it's way low on coolant. The heater will blow cold air when the cooling system is so low that there is no water (coolant) running through the heater core. Then the thermostat opens, it trys to be normal but the system is low so it gets too hot in just a few minutes. If its that low, there must be a leak somwhere.

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Air blows hot charged it gauge reads all the way in red someone over filled


Now you need a professional to leak test the a/c system

Recover the refrigerant & properly charge it

No one without a/c knowledge & proper equipment, should
work on any a/c system, vehicle,home, business, etc

Those wal mart kits should not be sold to the public,
as everyone lets in air & ruins the system

Aug 24, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

AC NOT WORKING PROPERLY


You've got some of the picture, but not all of it.
You need to know what the high and low side readings are, so yes you do need the gauge set. If the system is charged, and the low side is not dropping below 25psi, I would guess the low side pressure switch is faulty. But if the low side is dropping below 20psi when the compressor stops, the system may be low on freon. Which means you have a leak somewhere.
The hissing noise is freon flowing thru the system which could also indicate a low charge.

Apr 22, 2013 | 2009 Buick Enclave

1 Answer

The car has been in the shop for a week. mechanic can not figure it out. AC runs fine at idol but when you drive it for about 20 minutes it will only blow hot air. When you stop and turnit off and wait...


If there is a restriction in the a/c system, the pressure may be getting either too low or too high for system to work properly.

Also, if the charge is low, the compressor may not turn on 20 minutes into your trip.

Check to see if the pressure on the low side is 25 psi to 45 psi when running the a/c.

Good luck.

Jul 05, 2010 | 2006 Volvo S40

3 Answers

I have a 1994 chevy c1500 with a 305 motor. when i turn on the A/C the clutch engages/disengages continuously but no cold air. Any ideas?


Your A/C system may be running low on R134a.
To diagnose problems, an A/C manifold gauge set is needed to read high and low side pressure readings. Avoid adding refrigerant with a simple charging kit like the ones sold at parts stores. Don’t add any stop leak, this can cause problems in the compressor, expansion valve or condenser.
First, on a 134A system the high and low side service ports are different sizes. AC gauge sets have color coded hoses, the blue color coded hose has a connection that fits on the low side service port and the red hose has a connection that will only fit onto the high side. The yellow hose won’t hook up to anything if just checking the readings; it can be used to connect to a vacuum pump or attached to a refrigerant can or tank.
Normal readings on high and low side with AC OFF (static pressure) – Depends on outside temperature, but normally is between 80-105 PSI
Normal low side reading with AC on high speed and MAX & engine at 800-1000 RPM’s – Ranges from 25-35 PSI – Note that on many Chrysler products a normal reading on the low side may be 15-25 PSI
Normal high side reading ranges from 200-350 PSI
Don’t assume that if adding little Freon is good that adding a lot is better! Overcharging just a little can decrease the performance of the system and possibly damage the compressor.
With the AC on the coldest setting, use a thermometer in a middle vent. Normal vent temperature readings will vary depending on the (ambient) outside temp. The vent temperature should range from around 42-55 degrees in my experience. If normal gauge readings are obtained and the vent air is cold – STOP don’t overcharge the system. The only proper way to remove refrigerant is with a AC recovery machine so if this is being done at home I can’t emphasize enough not to over charge the system. And actually the best way to insure the proper charge is in a system, is to use an AC machine to recover the freon and then evacuate and recharge the system with the correct amount. Most cars have the specified amount on a decal under the hood.
Both low and high side readings are lower than normal, this indicates a cars AC system is low on refrigerant and is under-charged.
If both low and high side readings are too high, this indicates an overcharged system – too much refrigerant. This also can indicate that the condenser fan is not working, is too slow or the car is overheating and heat is transferring from the radiator to the condenser.
When the low side goes so low that it’s reading shows it is in a vacuum, the most likely cause is a bad expansion valve or blocked orifice tube. Another possibility is a restricted condenser. Blocked condensers are not as common as they used to be but if a compressor fails and comes apart inside the remnants can end up in the condenser causing it to restrict the flow of refrigerant.
When the compressor clutch is definitely engaged and the low side is high and the high side is low, the most likely cause is that the compressor is failing – it is not pumping sufficiently. Rarely an AC clutch could be slipping but usually this will be accompanied with a squeal or chirp. Also be sure not to overlook the obvious, like a loose belt
Note: The line going from the compressor to the condenser is the discharge line – it is normal for it to be very hot to the touch. The other line going from the drier or accumulator to the compressor is normally colder. The liquid line can be hot up to the point an orifice tube is in place. Just remember that LOW Pressure = COLD and HIGH Pressure = HOT.
If you do want to recharge the system your self, make sure you do not over charge and use the thermometer at the vent and when it's cold enough, turn off the valve from the recharge line and disconnect from the low pressure service port. Good luck

Nov 04, 2009 | 1994 Chevrolet C1500

1 Answer

Air condition blows hot air but it has freon


You may have created an over charged condition and at this point the a/c compressor will cut off on high head pressures. This can be verified by installing gauges to the systems high and low side service taps and reading the pressures.An overcharged system will start the compressor briefly but soon cuts off once pressure goes to 350 - 400 lbs on the high side. Acceptable pressures for this system should be no greater than 250 high and low suction should drop to 40-50 psi.You might recover the charge and evacuate the system,then try bringing the charge back to proper level.A sight glass in the reciever drier really helps determining proper fill.Once all bubbles have dissipated from the sight glass during charging ,one should stop at that point to avoid overfilling.Too much freon is worse than a low charge especially in hot ambient conditions....

Aug 26, 2009 | 2003 Saturn ION

1 Answer

I have full gas in my car but still no cold air inside the car


If you over charged the system your a/c will not work. To diagnose problems, an A/C manifold gauge set is needed to read high and low side pressure readings. Avoid adding refrigerant with a simple charging kit like the ones sold at parts stores. Don’t add any stop leak, this can cause problems in the compressor, expansion valve or condenser.
Keep in mind that using an A/C gauge set and seeing BOTH high and low side readings can help in diagnosing the problem when you know what to look for. First, on a 134A system the high and low side service ports are different sizes. AC gauge sets have color coded hoses, the blue color coded hose has a connection that fits on the low side service port and the red hose has a connection that will only fit onto the high side. The yellow hose won’t hook up to anything if just checking the readings; it can be used to connect to a vacuum pump or attached to a refrigerant can or tank.

Normal readings on high and low side with AC OFF (static pressure) - Depends on outside temperature, but normally is between 80-105PSI  Normal low side reading with AC on high speed and MAX & engine at 800-1000 RPM’s - Ranges from 25-35 PSI - Note that on many Chrysler products a normal reading on the low side may be 15-25PSI  Normal high side reading ranges from 200-350 PSI
Don’t assume that if adding little Freon is good that adding a lot is better!  Overcharging just a little can decrease the performance of the system and possibly damage the compressor.

With the AC on the coldest setting, use a thermometer in a middle vent. Normal vent temperature readings will vary depending on the (ambient) outside temp. The vent temperature should range from around 42-55 degrees in my experience. If normal gauge readings are obtained and the vent air is cold - STOP don’t overcharge the system. The only proper way to remove refrigerant is with a AC recovery machine so if this is being done at home I can’t emphasize enough not to over charge the system. And actually the best way to insure the proper charge is in a system, is to use an AC machine to recover the freon and then evacuate and recharge the system with the correct amount. Most cars have the specified amount on a decal under the hood. 

Both low and high side readings are lower than normal, this indicates a cars AC system is low on refrigerant and is under-charged.

If both low and high side readings are too high, this indicates an overcharged system - too much refrigerant. This also can indicate that the condenser fan is not working, is too slow or the car is overheating and heat is transferring from the radiator to the condenser.

Good luck and hope this helps, keep me posted be glad to answer any question you may have. 


Jul 02, 2009 | 1998 Honda Prelude

1 Answer

How do I service my A/C 2000 Chevy Impala LS


To diagnose problems, an A/C manifold gauge set is needed to read high and low side pressure readings. Avoid adding refrigerant with a simple charging kit like the ones sold at parts stores. Don’t add any stop leak, this can cause problems in the compressor, expansion valve or condenser.
Keep in mind that using an A/C gauge set and seeing BOTH high and low side readings can help in diagnosing the problem when you know what to look for. First, on a 134A system the high and low side service ports are different sizes. AC gauge sets have color coded hoses, the blue color coded hose has a connection that fits on the low side service port and the red hose has a connection that will only fit onto the high side. The yellow hose won’t hook up to anything if just checking the readings; it can be used to connect to a vacuum pump or attached to a refrigerant can or tank.

Normal readings on high and low side with AC OFF (static pressure) - Depends on outside temperature, but normally is between 80-105 PSI Normal low side reading with AC on high speed and MAX & engine at 800-1000 RPM’s - Ranges from 25-35 PSI - Note that on many Chrysler products a normal reading on the low side may be 15-25 PSI Normal high side reading ranges from 200-350 PSI

Don’t assume that if adding little Freon is good that adding a lot is better!  Overcharging just a little can decrease the performance of the system and possibly damage the compressor.

Both low and high side readings are lower than normal, this indicates a cars AC system is low on refrigerant and is under-charged.

If both low and high side readings are too high, this indicates an overcharged system - too much refrigerant. This also can indicate that the condenser fan is not working, is too slow or the car is overheating and heat is transferring from the radiator to the condenser.

If you are going to by the recharge kit at an Auto Parts store, With the AC on the coldest setting, use a thermometer in a middle vent. Normal vent temperature readings will vary depending on the (ambient) outside temp. The vent temperature should range from around 42-55 degrees in my experience. If normal gauge readings are obtained and the vent air is cold - STOP don’t overcharge the system. The only proper way to remove refrigerant is with a AC recovery machine so if this is being done at home I can’t emphasize enough not to over charge the system. And actually the best way to insure the proper charge is in a system, is to use an AC machine to recover the freon and then evacuate and recharge the system with the correct amount. Most cars have the specified amount on a decal under the hood. 
Good luck and keep me posted, be glad to answer more questions you may have. 

Jul 02, 2009 | 2000 Chevrolet Impala

1 Answer

The a/c on my 2006 honda pilot is not owrking and appears to have a low refrigerant charge. I want to recharge it and find the leak with die. what is the amount of 134a to be fully charged


Adding freon or topping off a cars A/C system is the most common task performed to restore performance and get cold air blowing again. However, adding refrigerant isn’t always the solution for car air conditioning problems. There can be many other things wrong besides a system being low on refrigerant. To diagnose problems, an A/C manifold gauge set is needed to read high and low side pressure readings. Avoid adding refrigerant with a simple charging kit like the ones sold at parts stores. Don’t add any stop leak, this can cause problems in the compressor, expansion valve or condenser.
Keep in mind that using an A/C gauge set and seeing BOTH high and low side readings can help in diagnosing the problem when you know what to look for. First, on a 134A system the high and low side service ports are different sizes. AC gauge sets have color coded hoses, the blue color coded hose has a connection that fits on the low side service port and the red hose has a connection that will only fit onto the high side. The yellow hose won’t hook up to anything if just checking the readings; it can be used to connect to a vacuum pump or attached to a refrigerant can or tank.

*Make sure the condenser fan comes on when the readings are being checked.

Normal readings on high and low side with AC OFF (static pressure) - Depends on outside temperature, but normally is between 80-105 PSI
Normal low side reading with AC on high speed and MAX & engine at 800-1000 RPM’s - Ranges from 25-35 PSI - Note that on many Chrysler products a normal reading on the low side may be 15-25 PSI
Normal high side reading ranges from 200-350 PSI

Don’t assume that if adding little Freon is good that adding a lot is better!  Overcharging just a little can decrease the performance of the system and possibly damage the compressor.

With the AC on the coldest setting, use a thermometer in a middle vent. Normal vent temperature readings will vary depending on the (ambient) outside temp. The vent temperature should range from around 42-55 degrees in my experience. If normal gauge readings are obtained and the vent air is cold - STOP don’t overcharge the system. The only proper way to remove refrigerant is with a AC recovery machine so if this is being done at home I can’t emphasize enough not to over charge the system. And actually the best way to insure the proper charge is in a system, is to use an AC machine to recover the R143a and then evacuate and recharge the system with the correct amount. Most cars have the specified amount on a decal under the hood. 

Hope this helps. Keep me posted, be glad to help get you cooled again. 

Jul 01, 2009 | 2004 Honda Pilot

1 Answer

Air conditioning


It sounds like you over charged the system, the low side should be 40psi to 50psi with the A/C on high and the high pressure side should read 150psi to 200psi. Anything different, you need to get the system service and try not to use your A/C to prevent the compressor from any damages. Good luck and hope this helps.

Jun 15, 2009 | 2001 Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD

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