Question about 2001 Toyota Tacoma

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AC temperature AC works, fan works but AC temperature cannot be adjusted. I think I need a servo motor, where can I get one?

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Servo motor? I disagree. Actually, there are 3 servo motors in the vehicle; an air inlet servo, an air mix servo, and an air outlet servo. None of which control the temperature.
The AC temp is controlled by a thermister in the cooler box/eveporator unit under the dash.

Posted on Sep 10, 2008

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Volvo v50 2005 climate control puts out heat on driver's side and windshield when AC is on or temperature control is at low. Passenger side puts out cold air. Both sides of climate control are set at low.


I had the same problem. AC computer forgot where the adjustment flaps are.
- Start the car.
- Press Auto button on the AC (if you have this option)
- Increase fan speed (make shure it is not on minimmal setting)
- Decrease the temperature setting to the minimum -> "Lo"
- Wait about 10-20 seconds
- increase the temperature to the maximum -> "Hi"
- Wait about 10-20 seconds
- Set the temperature that you like.

With this procedure you force the AC to move the temperature regulating flaps to go to both end-positions and motors get calibrated again.


If this does not help, there must be a bad contact somewhere or the fpals may get stuck. -> repair.

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2 Answers

Blower on ac doesn't blow hard enough. very cool air but volume is low. any suggestions?


there are several possibilities, it could be a servo switch or servo motor that actuates the doors inside the system it may be blowing half the air where it isn't needed, Try it in the recirculate mode w/o fresh air. If it sets under trees and has leaves under the hood at rear near wind wipers it can stop up your evaporator core thats what the fan blows across to cool the car.Most cars have no filter system from the air intake ie the cowl plenum and if it gets full of trash it can go right to the evap core.

Jun 21, 2009 | 2004 Mazda 6

1 Answer

Air conditioning fan makes loud noise the faster you ru it.


Concerning your broken vent -- this can be caused by a broken linkage or a malfunctioning servo motor as well. these vent have air ducts the sway back and forth to adjust the dual air flow function. if the servo o linkages are malfunctioning or not connected for some reason, it will not allow total control of the air flow and temperature range. Now, if you have a combination of a flow error and temperature error as well, thai can be caused by a combination of the two.

In this case, you will need to inspect the linkages as well as the servo motor function as well. in addition, i would test the air temp sensors for there operational value. they control the temp when you adjust the coll or hot function.

Concerning the Loud noise coming from the blower fan---

This issue can be caused by a misalignment within the blower housing or, it can also be caused by some minor damage within the motor itself, causing it to rotate in a erratic manner, in return, forcing it to rub against the housing itself. the best solution here is to extract this blower fan housing and inspect for lose fan propeller and motor stability. replace parts accordingly.

PLease rate and have a great day:)

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1 Answer

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HI. Here is a complete check list that will help you trouble shot thsi issue. You will find the problem in one or more of these areas stated below.

1. Check Drive Belts - The air conditioner utilizes a drive belt that supplies power to rotate the compressor, which is basically a refrigerant pump. If the belt fails the compressor has nothing to drive it, inspect and replace as needed to restore operation. If belt is intact proceed to the next step.

2. Check for Compressor Clutch Engagement - Turn the air conditioner to the "on" position and set controls to the coldest setting. Start the engine and allow to idle. Then open the hood and inspect the clutch at the front of the compressor, is it turning? "Engaged" if so, the system has enough refrigerant to activate. If the system is low on refrigerant it will not work properly. In this case an air conditioner recharge kit is needed to recharge the system. If the system is low on refrigerant it could cycle on and off, making a ticking noise. If the compressor clutch is not turning proceed to next step.

3. Inspect for Refrigerant Leaks - If the system has a large leak and no refrigerant remains it will not activate. First test system for a static pressure charge, with the engine off attach an ac gauge to the low side pressure port and check the state of charge. Depending on outside temperature there should be between 50 psi and 80 psi. (Cool and warm). A refrigerant leak detector is needed to inspect for leak, but if you do not have a leak detector there is an alternative method. The air conditioner system is designed to run with oil suspended in the refrigerant to lubricate the system. Check for oily residue outside the system by inspecting all hoses, compressor, condenser, evaporator or receiver drier and replace any component that has failed.

4. Inspect Fuses - Check under dash panel and under hood power distribution center. Replace failed fuses as needed, recheck system. If the new fuse fails when reinstalled a short circuit is present and requires diagnosing with a wiring schematic, follow circuits to locate short, repair as needed and recheck system.

5. Check Temperature Control Vents - The vents inside your car are controlled by a cable, electrical servo or vacuum servo. If the temperature blend door is not functioning properly it will cause warm air from the heater to exit the vents. To check this start the car and allow the engine idle, next turn the blower motor speed on low, switch the temperature control from warm to cold while your ear is close to the vents. You should hear the door move inside the heater box as it swings from open to close. If not, insect for a vacuum leak or a shorted motor in the servo, repair the leak or replace the servo motor...

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1 Answer

AC/heat/defrost functions don't work


there is a blend door and a selector door in the HVAC system. These are run by vacuum or servo motors. Sounds like this little motor is your problem. Hope this helps you.

Jan 18, 2009 | 1997 Ford Thunderbird LX

1 Answer

When starting the car the AC Compressor wont come on right away


HI. Here is a complete check list that will help you trouble shot thsi issue. You will find the problem in one or more of these areas stated below.

1. Check Drive Belts - The air conditioner utilizes a drive belt that supplies power to rotate the compressor, which is basically a refrigerant pump. If the belt fails the compressor has nothing to drive it, inspect and replace as needed to restore operation. If belt is intact proceed to the next step.

2. Check for Compressor Clutch Engagement - Turn the air conditioner to the "on" position and set controls to the coldest setting. Start the engine and allow to idle. Then open the hood and inspect the clutch at the front of the compressor, is it turning? "Engaged" if so, the system has enough refrigerant to activate. If the system is low on refrigerant it will not work properly. In this case an air conditioner recharge kit is needed to recharge the system. If the system is low on refrigerant it could cycle on and off, making a ticking noise. If the compressor clutch is not turning proceed to next step.

3. Inspect for Refrigerant Leaks - If the system has a large leak and no refrigerant remains it will not activate. First test system for a static pressure charge, with the engine off attach an ac gauge to the low side pressure port and check the state of charge. Depending on outside temperature there should be between 50 psi and 80 psi. (Cool and warm). A refrigerant leak detector is needed to inspect for leak, but if you do not have a leak detector there is an alternative method. The air conditioner system is designed to run with oil suspended in the refrigerant to lubricate the system. Check for oily residue outside the system by inspecting all hoses, compressor, condenser, evaporator or receiver drier and replace any component that has failed.

4. Inspect Fuses - Check under dash panel and under hood power distribution center. Replace failed fuses as needed, recheck system. If the new fuse fails when reinstalled a short circuit is present and requires diagnosing with a wiring schematic, follow circuits to locate short, repair as needed and recheck system.

5. Check Temperature Control Vents - The vents inside your car are controlled by a cable, electrical servo or vacuum servo. If the temperature blend door is not functioning properly it will cause warm air from the heater to exit the vents. To check this start the car and allow the engine idle, next turn the blower motor speed on low, switch the temperature control from warm to cold while your ear is close to the vents. You should hear the door move inside the heater box as it swings from open to close. If not, insect for a vacuum leak or a shorted motor in the servo, repair the leak or replace the servo motor.

Nov 18, 2008 | 2001 Volkswagen Jetta TDI

1 Answer

A.C.


HI. Here is a complete check list that will help you trouble shot this issue. You will find the problem in one or more of these areas stated below.

1. Check Drive Belts - The air conditioner utilizes a drive belt that supplies power to rotate the compressor, which is basically a refrigerant pump. If the belt fails the compressor has nothing to drive it, inspect and replace as needed to restore operation. If belt is intact proceed to the next step.

2. Check for Compressor Clutch Engagement - Turn the air conditioner to the "on" position and set controls to the coldest setting. Start the engine and allow to idle. Then open the hood and inspect the clutch at the front of the compressor, is it turning? "Engaged" if so, the system has enough refrigerant to activate. If the system is low on refrigerant it will not work properly. In this case an air conditioner recharge kit is needed to recharge the system. If the system is low on refrigerant it could cycle on and off, making a ticking noise. If the compressor clutch is not turning proceed to next step.

3. Inspect for Refrigerant Leaks - If the system has a large leak and no refrigerant remains it will not activate. First test system for a static pressure charge, with the engine off attach an ac gauge to the low side pressure port and check the state of charge. Depending on outside temperature there should be between 50 psi and 80 psi. (Cool and warm). A refrigerant leak detector is needed to inspect for leak, but if you do not have a leak detector there is an alternative method. The air conditioner system is designed to run with oil suspended in the refrigerant to lubricate the system. Check for oily residue outside the system by inspecting all hoses, compressor, condenser, evaporator or receiver drier and replace any component that has failed.

4. Inspect Fuses - Check under dash panel and under hood power distribution center. Replace failed fuses as needed, recheck system. If the new fuse fails when reinstalled a short circuit is present and requires diagnosing with a wiring schematic, follow circuits to locate short, repair as needed and recheck system.

5. Check Temperature Control Vents - The vents inside your car are controlled by a cable, electrical servo or vacuum servo. If the temperature blend door is not functioning properly it will cause warm air from the heater to exit the vents. To check this start the car and allow the engine idle, next turn the blower motor speed on low, switch the temperature control from warm to cold while your ear is close to the vents. You should hear the door move inside the heater box as it swings from open to close. If not, insect for a vacuum leak or a shorted motor in the servo, repair the leak or replace the servo motor.

Aug 31, 2008 | 1999 Oldsmobile Silhouette

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