Question about 1998 GMC Envoy

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My 1998 gmc envoy 130,000 has failed inspection. i had 1 sensor replace,oil filter,air filter, ac spark plug,ignition wire set, and ignition coil all replace. code#p0302 n p0453 seem to be my problem. could it be my distrubtor cap gone bad injector problem or is it a compression problem to cylinder#2. any advice is appreciated

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There is only 2 things left the injector witch i have seen go bad or a wire at the injector . this injection system has 1 12 volt wire feed wire and 1 each wire that pulsates each injector from the ECM the po 453 is catalytic efficiency what its really saying is fix the problem before you clogs the cat s you really need to put a scan tool on the car and read the o2 sensors and find out if they are functioning properly not just numbers from 0 to 1 volt but graph to show what they are really doing . IF your semi mechanic i will try to work to fix this problem

Posted on Jan 03, 2011

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Remove the spark plug and see if it is wet. See if it smells like gas. Put the plug in the plug wire and crank the car to see if it sparks. If so, get a compression gauge and screw it into the plug hole and crank the engine. Good compression 100lbs or better. If good suspect injector.

Posted on Jan 03, 2011

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1 Answer

Do a 2004 Envoy SLT 4.2L have a Ignition Module?


Crankshaft position sensor,cam sensor . your vehicle should have coil on plug , a coil at each spark plug !
Ignition Coils
Each ignition coil has an ignition 1 feed and a ground. The PCM supplies an ignition control (IC) circuit. Each ignition coil contains a solid state driver module as its primary element. The powertrain control module (PCM) signals the coil driver to initiate a firing event by applying a signal to the IC circuit at the appropriate time. When the signal is removed, the coil fires the spark plug. The spark plugs are tipped with platinum for long wear and higher efficiency.
During normal operation the powertrain control module (PCM) controls all ignition functions. If either the crankshaft position (CKP) or camshaft position (CMP) sensor signal is lost, the engine will continue to run because the PCM will default to a limp home mode using the remaining sensor input. As mentioned above, each coil is internally protected against damage from excessive voltage. If one or more coils were to fail in this manner, a misfiring condition would result. Diagnostic trouble codes are available to accurately diagnose the ignition system with a scan tool.
If a crank sensor is replaced a Crankshaft Position System Variation Learn must be done and a scan tool is need to do this.

Nov 30, 2016 | 2004 GMC Envoy SLT

1 Answer

Hard starting


This problem can be hard to track down , it could be caused by several thing's ! A bad check valve in the fuel pump letting fuel drain back into the tank , not keeping fuel line pressure up , a crankshaft position sensor can also cause this as well as an ignition control module !
Checks
Action
DEFINITION: Engine cranks OK, but does not start for a long time. Does eventually run, or may start but immediately dies.
Preliminary
?€¢
Refer to Important Preliminary Checks Before Starting in Symptoms - Engine Controls .


?€¢
Inspect the powertrain control module (PCM) grounds for being clean, tight, and in the proper locations. Refer to Engine Controls Schematics .


?€¢
Search for bulletins.

Sensor/System
?€¢
Test the engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor for being shifted in value. Connect a scan tool. Compare the engine coolant temperature against the intake air temperature (IAT) on a cold engine. The ECT and IAT sensor values should be within ?± 3?°C (5?°F) of each other. If the ECT sensor is out of range with the IAT sensor, check the resistance of the ECT sensor. Refer to Temperature Versus Resistance for resistance specifications. Replace the ECT sensor if the resistance is not within the specification. If the sensor is within the specification, repair the ECT signal circuit for high resistance.


?€¢
Inspect the mass air flow (MAF) sensor installation. A MAF sensor that is incorrectly installed may cause a hard start. Important: The embossed arrows on the MAF sensor indicate the direction of the intake air flow. The arrows must point toward the engine. Install the MAF in the proper direction. Refer to Mass Airflow Sensor/Intake Air Temperature Sensor Replacement .


?€¢
Inspect the camshaft position (CMP) sensor for proper mounting and/or a bad connection. A long crank time occurs if the PCM does not receive a CMP signal.

Fuel System
?€¢
Inspect the fuel pump relay operation. The fuel pump should turn ON for 2 seconds when you turn ON the ignition. Refer to Fuel Pump Electrical Circuit Diagnosis .


?€¢
A faulty in-tank fuel pump check valve allows the fuel in the lines to drain back to the tank after the engine stops. Refer to Fuel System Diagnosis .


?€¢
Inspect both injector fuses for being open. An open injector fuse causes four injectors and four ignition coils not to operate. Replace the fuse. Inspect the injector circuits and the ignition coil circuits for an intermittent short to ground.


?€¢
Inspect for incorrect fuel pressure. Refer to Fuel System Diagnosis .


?€¢
Inspect for a restricted fuel filter. Refer to Fuel System Diagnosis .


?€¢
Inspect for a contaminated fuel condition. Refer to Alcohol/Contaminants-in-Fuel Diagnosis .


Ignition System
?€¢
Test both injector fuses for being open. An open injector fuse causes four ignition coils and four injectors not to operate. Replace the fuse. Inspect the ignition coil circuits and the injector circuits for an intermittent short to ground.


?€¢
Inspect for proper ignition voltage output with J 26792 Spark Tester. Refer to Electronic Ignition (EI) System Diagnosis .


?€¢
Remove the spark plugs and check for the following:


-
Correct heat range


-
Wet plugs


-
Cracks


-
Wear


-
Improper gap


-
Burned electrodes


-
Heavy deposits

Refer to Spark Plug Inspection in Engine Electrical.
?€¢
Determine the cause of the fouling before replacing the spark plugs if the spark plugs are gas, coolant, or oil fouled. Refer to DTC P0172 or P0175 for diagnosis of the rich condition. Refer to Spark Plug Inspection in Engine Electrical for diagnosis of coolant or oil fouled spark plugs.


?€¢
Inspect for bare or shorted ignition wires.


?€¢
Inspect for loose ignition coil grounds. Refer to Electronic Ignition (EI) System Diagnosis .

Jul 14, 2015 | 2002 GMC Sierra 1500

1 Answer

Spark plugs


Check this SPARK PLUG REPLACEMENT - REMOVAL PROCEDURE

1_23_2012_5_10_32_pm.jpg

1. Remove the ignition coils (lines at end this document), then return here once you have gotten the Coil
Packs off and precede with step 2 from here.
2. Clean the spark plug recesses with low pressure air. CAUTION: Wear safety glasses
when using compressed air, as flying dirt particles may cause eye injury. NOTE:
Clean the spark plug recess area before removing the spark plug. Failure to do so could
result in engine damage because of dirt or foreign material entering the cylinder head, or
by the contamination of the cylinder head threads. The contaminated threads may prevent
the proper seating of the new plug. Use a thread chaser to clean the threads of any
contamination.
3. Remove the spark plugs from the cylinder head. NOTE: Allow the engine to cool before
removing the spark plugs. Attempting to remove the spark plugs from a hot engine may
cause the plug threads to seize, causing damage to cylinder head threads.
4. Inspect the spark plugs.

INSTALLATION PROCEDURE

1_23_2012_5_11_30_pm.jpg

1. Measure the spark plug gap on the spark plugs to be installed. Compare the measurement
to the gap specifications. NOTE:
• Use only the spark plugs specified for use in the vehicle. Do not install spark
plugs that are either hotter or colder than those specified for the vehicle. Installing
spark plugs of another type can severely damage the engine.
• Check the gap of all new and reconditioned spark plugs before installation. The
pre-set gaps may have changed during handling. Use a round feeler gage to ensure
an accurate check. Installing the spark plugs with the wrong gap can cause poor
engine performance and may even damage the engine.
2. Install the spark plugs to the cylinder head. NOTE:
• Be sure that the spark plug threads smoothly into the cylinder head and the spark
plug is fully seated. Use a thread chaser, if necessary, to clean threads in the
cylinder head. Cross-threading or failing to fully seat the spark plug can cause
overheating of the plug, exhaust blow-by, or thread damage.
• Refer to Component Fastener Tightening Notice in Service Precautions.
Tighten the spark plugs to 18 N.m (13 lb ft).
3. Install the ignition coils.

IGNITION COIL(S) REPLACEMENT
REMOVAL PROCEDURE
1. Remove the air cleaner resonator and outlet duct.
2. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connector (1) from the oil pressure sensor (2).
3. Disconnect the engine wiring harness retainers (1) from the power steering pump (2).
4. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors (1, 4) from the following:
• The exhaust camshaft position (CMP) sensor (5)
• The camshaft position (CMP) actuator solenoid valve (6)
5. Disconnect the engine wiring harness retainer (2) from the camshaft cover (3).
6. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors from the following:
• The engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor (1)
• The fuel injector harness (2)
• The ignition coils (4)
• The heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) (5)
7. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connector from the intake camshaft position (CMP) sensor.
8. Carefully disengage the engine wiring harness conduit from the camshaft cover, and position aside.
9. Remove the ignition coil bolts.
10. Remove the ignition coils from the camshaft cover.

INSTALLATION PROCEDURE
1. Install the ignition coils into the camshaft cover. IMPORTANT: Ensure the ignition coil seals are properly seated to the camshaft cover.
2. Install the ignition coil bolts. NOTE: Refer to Fastener Notice in Service Precautions. Tighten the ignition coil bolts to 10 N.m (89 lb in).
3. Attach the engine wiring harness conduit to the camshaft cover.
4. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connector to the intake CMP sensor.
5. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors to the following:
• The ECT sensor (1)
• The fuel injector harness (2)
• The ignition coils (4)
• The HO2S (5)
6. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors (1, 4) to the following:
• The exhaust CMP sensor (5)
• The CMP actuator solenoid valve (6)
7. Connect the engine wiring harness retainer (2) to the camshaft cover (3).
8. Connect the engine wiring harness retainers (1) to the power steering pump (2).
9. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connector (1) to the oil pressure sensor (2).
10. Install the air cleaner resonator and outlet duct.

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Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Jan 23, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to change spark plugs in a 2005 chev colorado


SPARK PLUG REPLACEMENT - REMOVAL PROCEDURE

1_23_2012_5_10_32_pm.jpg

1. Remove the ignition coils (lines at end this document), then return here once you have gotten the Coil
Packs off and precede with step 2 from here.
2. Clean the spark plug recesses with low pressure air. CAUTION: Wear safety glasses
when using compressed air, as flying dirt particles may cause eye injury. NOTE:
Clean the spark plug recess area before removing the spark plug. Failure to do so could
result in engine damage because of dirt or foreign material entering the cylinder head, or
by the contamination of the cylinder head threads. The contaminated threads may prevent
the proper seating of the new plug. Use a thread chaser to clean the threads of any
contamination.
3. Remove the spark plugs from the cylinder head. NOTE: Allow the engine to cool before
removing the spark plugs. Attempting to remove the spark plugs from a hot engine may
cause the plug threads to seize, causing damage to cylinder head threads.
4. Inspect the spark plugs.

INSTALLATION PROCEDURE

1_23_2012_5_11_30_pm.jpg

1. Measure the spark plug gap on the spark plugs to be installed. Compare the measurement
to the gap specifications. NOTE:
• Use only the spark plugs specified for use in the vehicle. Do not install spark
plugs that are either hotter or colder than those specified for the vehicle. Installing
spark plugs of another type can severely damage the engine.
• Check the gap of all new and reconditioned spark plugs before installation. The
pre-set gaps may have changed during handling. Use a round feeler gage to ensure
an accurate check. Installing the spark plugs with the wrong gap can cause poor
engine performance and may even damage the engine.
2. Install the spark plugs to the cylinder head. NOTE:
• Be sure that the spark plug threads smoothly into the cylinder head and the spark
plug is fully seated. Use a thread chaser, if necessary, to clean threads in the
cylinder head. Cross-threading or failing to fully seat the spark plug can cause
overheating of the plug, exhaust blow-by, or thread damage.
• Refer to Component Fastener Tightening Notice in Service Precautions.
Tighten the spark plugs to 18 N.m (13 lb ft).
3. Install the ignition coils.

IGNITION COIL(S) REPLACEMENT
REMOVAL PROCEDURE
1. Remove the air cleaner resonator and outlet duct.
2. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connector (1) from the oil pressure sensor (2).
3. Disconnect the engine wiring harness retainers (1) from the power steering pump (2).
4. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors (1, 4) from the following:
• The exhaust camshaft position (CMP) sensor (5)
• The camshaft position (CMP) actuator solenoid valve (6)
5. Disconnect the engine wiring harness retainer (2) from the camshaft cover (3).
6. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors from the following:
• The engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor (1)
• The fuel injector harness (2)
• The ignition coils (4)
• The heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) (5)
7. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connector from the intake camshaft position (CMP) sensor.
8. Carefully disengage the engine wiring harness conduit from the camshaft cover, and position aside.
9. Remove the ignition coil bolts.
10. Remove the ignition coils from the camshaft cover.

INSTALLATION PROCEDURE
1. Install the ignition coils into the camshaft cover. IMPORTANT: Ensure the ignition coil seals are properly seated to the camshaft cover.
2. Install the ignition coil bolts. NOTE: Refer to Fastener Notice in Service Precautions. Tighten the ignition coil bolts to 10 N.m (89 lb in).
3. Attach the engine wiring harness conduit to the camshaft cover.
4. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connector to the intake CMP sensor.
5. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors to the following:
• The ECT sensor (1)
• The fuel injector harness (2)
• The ignition coils (4)
• The HO2S (5)
6. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors (1, 4) to the following:
• The exhaust CMP sensor (5)
• The CMP actuator solenoid valve (6)
7. Connect the engine wiring harness retainer (2) to the camshaft cover (3).
8. Connect the engine wiring harness retainers (1) to the power steering pump (2).
9. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connector (1) to the oil pressure sensor (2).
10. Install the air cleaner resonator and outlet duct.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Jan 23, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 1990 mitsubishi might max it wont run smooth unless you keep your foot on the gas and keep the rpms up a little bit and it wont drive cause it stalls everytime you try to move it. ive replaced the...


You've already eliminated the spark plug & wireset, distributor cap & rotor.
Sounds like your car needs a tune-up, specifically, the PCV (positive crankcase ventilation) valve, and/of the EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) valve.

Components checked/replaced during a tune-up are:
air filter
motor oil
motor oil filter
breather filter
fuel filter(s)
fuel strainer
PCV valve
EGR valve
spark plugs
spark plug wires
ECM or distributor cap & rotor
cabin air filter
transmission oil filter
transmission oil
engine coolant
check all vacuum hoses and lines

Troubleshooting the no-start condition - from the 1990 Mitsu Mighty Max Repair Manual:

Priority Action Part Type -- Cause
1 Inspect Battery -- Battery Discharged or Faulty.
2 Inspect Battery Cable -- Corroded, Broken, Shorted or Poorly Connected Battery Cable.
3 Inspect Distributor Cap -- Distributor Cap Cracked or Burned.
3 Inspect Fuel Filter -- Clogged or Dirty Fuel Filter.
5 Inspect Ignition Coil -- Faulty Ignition Coil.
6 Inspect Wireset -- Worn, Damaged or Faulty Spark Plug Wire(s).
7 Inspect Spark Plug -- Incorrectly Gapped or Fouled Spark Plug(s).
8 Inspect Starter -- Starter Motor Faulty.
9 Inspect Fuel Pump -- Low Fuel Pressure.
10 Inspect Solenoid Switch -- Faulty Starter Solenoid Switch.
11 Inspect Fuel Pump Relay -- Faulty Fuel Pump Relay.
12 Inspect Fuel Injector Pressure Regulator -- Faulty Fuel Injector Pressure Regulator.
13 Inspect Ignition Switch -- Improperly Connected or Faulty Ignition Switch.
14 Inspect Starter Drive -- Faulty Starter Drive.
15 Inspect Fuel Injector -- Dirty or Worn Fuel Injectors.
16 Inspect Fuel Pump Strainer -- Clogged or Dirty Fuel Pump Strainerat.
17 Inspect Engine Control Computer -- Incorrect Operating Information Being Delivered and Sent From The EEC.
18 Inspect Fuel Tank -- Fuel Tank Empty.
19 Inspect Carburetor -- Carburetor Flooded or Faulty Choke.
20 Inspect Distributor -- Worn, Loose, or Incorrectly Installed Distributor.

Aug 17, 2011 | 1993 Mitsubishi Mighty Max

1 Answer

Diagnosed with ignition coil problem, replaced coil, spark plugs & wires, inspected pcm, vehicle running rough in gear, acceleration is rough, smooths out when it gets going. oil on one spark plug....


2006 3.9 has to be a T-Bird or LS

There are no spark plug wires

It has Coil-On-Plug individual coils

Plugs don't fail --they get changed at 60,000 miles
give or take,say every 3 years

The front (2) O2 Sensors get repalced at 100,000
miles. The ones closest to the engine

Clean MAF Sensor at least once a year

I have no idea how you inspect a pcm,if your
at home & have no scanner or PC Based Software

Egr Valves fail early on those & other fords

You could test,not look at,actually put an oscilloscope
on the TPS Sensor

Any oil on a spark plug requires a new valve cover gasket

If a coil was replaced based on a code alone,you may have
replaced a good one,not what needed to be replaced if any

Jul 13, 2011 | Ford Freestar Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Check engine codes 97 ford exp v8 codes:0358 0171 0174


P0171 and 174 System Too Lean
Basically this means that an oxygen sensor in banks 1 and 2 detected a lean condition (too much oxygen in the exhaust).

These codes may mean that one or more of the following has happened:
•The MAF (Mass Air Flow) Sensor is dirty or faulty. Note: The use of "oiled" air filters may cause the MAF to become dirty if the filter is over-oiled. There is also an issue with some vehicles where the MAF sensors leak the silicone potting material used to protect the circuitry.
•There could be a vacuum leak downstream of the MAF sensor.

•In the vast majority of cases, simply cleaning the MAF sensor does the trick. Consult your service manual for it's location if you need help. I find it's best to take it off and spray it with electronics cleaner or brake cleaner. Make sure you are careful not to damage the MAF sensor, and make sure it's dry before reinstalling.
•Inspect all vacuum and PCV hoses, replace if necessary
•Check for a dirty fuel filter and proper fuel pressure

P0358 Ignition Coil H Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction
Code P0358 is for cylinder #8.

Inspect the spark plug, coil, and coil boot on that cylinder for signs of damage. Replace as needed.

If no problems are found with the components, check the wiring harness from the coil to the Powertrain Control Module (PCM).

Potential Causes: Failed coil or boot
Failed spark plug
Harness problem

Feb 09, 2010 | 1997 Ford Expedition

3 Answers

What service should be performed at 90,000 miles on a 2003 GMC Envoy XL?


I would look into a tune-up as the spark plugs are a common cause of issues on this vehicle. I would at the very least remove the plugs and inspect them. If they are fine then it may be a clogged fuel filter.
Check the coolant and oil level

Nov 04, 2009 | 2003 GMC Envoy Xl

1 Answer

Check engine light on. 4 cylinder. Light flashes on acceleration. Sometimes idles rough. Computer scan reads random misfire and #2 & #3 misfiring. Added fuel injector cleaner but no help yet. Cleared...


There are three kinds of gasoline engine misfire scenarios, first there is the "under load" misfire and there is the "at engine idle" misfire, and finally there is misfire continuously. All engine misfires exist because one of three things has occurred. First, a cylinder has lost compression, a cylinder needs a certain amount of compression to operate correctly. Second, the ignition system has failed or is failing intermittently, spark is needed at the time of compression to ignite the fuel air mixture. Third, the fuel air mixture is incorrect, proper mixture is needed for the ignition system to ignite fuel properly. If any of these conditions occur in the engine, the engine will misfire.
1. Low or no compression can be caused by

a. burned or leaking intake or exhaust valves
b. worn or broken piston or piston rings
c. worn out camshaft
d. wrong weight motor oil was installed holding the cam followers from adjusting
e. broken valve spring
f. failed head gasket.
2. Ignition system has failed or is failing
a. spark plug has fouled or is worn out
b. ignition coil
has failed
c. spark plug wires have shorted
e. engine control module coil driver has failed
3. Fuel/Air Mixture is incorrect
a. vacuum leak at the intake manifold
b. fuel injector has failed
c. EGR valve is stuck open
d. mass air flow sensor has failed
e. oxygen sensor has failed
f. air intake boot is cracked

common problems:
1. fuel injector has failed or is failing
2. spark plug wire has shorted
3. spark plug is worn out or is cracked
4. ignition coil has failed is failing

Testing a coil on the car is pretty easy. No special tools are required. Just remember to be careful, the amount of electricity generated by your ignition system can be dangerous. If your coil is already off the car, or if you would like a more specific data-driven test, you can bench test your coil. To set up the test, remove one spark plug wire from its plug, then remove the spark plug using a spark plug socket. Next put the spark plug back into the spark plug wire. Be careful not to let anything drop into the empty spark plug hole -- very bad.

Dec 07, 2008 | 1999 Toyota Camry

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