Question about 1994 Honda Civic

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Civic esi sensor

What is the main function of the sensor just right above the fuel injection? my esi's sensor has a leak but still ok, should I replace it immediately?

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Purge valve or

Posted on Jul 12, 2008

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1998 honda civic. fuel pump when key is turned on registers 10. volts then immediately drops to zero. did a tune up the day before. cap,rotor,plugs,oil and filter. drove 15-20 miles then died. checked fuel...


You should have close to 12 volts and then it drops to 0. That is the ecu priming the fuel system. Once you start yu should have 12v constant to the same wire. If your fuel pump is functioning ok, scan ur ecu for trouble codes. If there are no codes look into your coil and your icm in the distributor. Very commo for failure. Once the car dies, remove any spark plug wire on the plug side and put a plug into the end of it. Put the electrode of the plug close to a bolt on the valve cover and get someone to start the car, see if the plug is sparking. If it is you have a problem with fuel delivery, may not have injection pulse. You may also have a main relay failure

Oct 20, 2013 | 1998 Honda Civic

1 Answer

Fuel sensor problem...


Are you sure you installed the correct part, there is a with low fuel warning and without one.

Oct 26, 2012 | 1994 Honda Civic

3 Answers

Trying to start engine but it start and getting too much gas


The make, model and year would be necessary.
For example, if it was old enough to have a carburetor, the main concern could be the float needle and seat. If it were fuel injected, then a leaking injector or bad mass air sensor would come to mind first.

May 09, 2011 | Buick Century Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

What will make the make it flood its self


An engine will flood if there's too much fuel going in because of a stuck choke, a bad spark not igniting the fuel, failed temperature sensors, bad fuel regulator, timing...the list goes on.

The amount of fuel delivered to a properly functioning injected car is determined by sensors mounted throughout the vehicles air intake system. These sensors work together along with the ecu to control the fuel / air mix delivered to the cylinders.

We would need to isolate the components that have impact on the duration of time the injectors stay open. In troubleshooting it is often best to work backwards.

1. Injectors - Are they leaking? 2. Pressure regulator - is the pressure at the fuel rail the right pressure?? (40psi for most fuel injected cars) 3. TPS- throttle position sensor- is this reading accurately...there are several different styles of these 4. Air flow meter - these also come in several varieties varys from mass air sensor / simple vane meters. 5. during startup there is a seperate circuit called the throttle bypass valve - this also may not be functioning if the flooding is occuring rapidly during startup. If the car starts and runs for a while than floods. this is probably not the culprit. 6. ultimately the ECU could have a problem as it is the link in the chain that ties everything together....though not likely. Any of these these would have the potential to flood a vehicle if they were not functioning properly. The amount of fuel delivered to a properly functioning injected car is determined by sensors mounted throughout the vehicles air intake system. These sensors work together along with the ecu to control the fuel / air mix delivered to the cylinders. We would need to isolate the components that have impact on the duration of time the injectors stay open. In troubleshooting it is often best to work backwards. 1. Injectors - Are they leaking 2. Pressure regulator - is the pressure at the fuel rail the right pressure?? (40psi for most fuel injected cars) 3. TPS- throttle position sensor- is this reading accurately...there are several different styles of these 4. Air flow meter - these also come in several varieties varys from mass air sensor / simple vane meters. 5. during startup there is a seperate circuit called the throttle bypass valve - this also may not be functioning if the flooding is occuring rapidly during startup. If the car starts and runs for a while than floods. this is probably not the culprit. 6. ultimately the ECU could have a problem as it is the link in the chain that ties everything together, but it's not likely.
This is just a list of things that could cause your car to flood!

Feb 24, 2011 | Mazda RX-7 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 1994 Honda Civic will start, but dies as soon as I let off the ignition. Any suggestions?


I'm not a qualified mechanic but I have driven all sorts of cars vans and motorcycles.
Starting / Running problems fall in to two categories
(1) High Tension/Low Tension ignition or
(2) Fuel/Air.

For (1) it could be a number of things. Here are a few questions which may help eliminate problems.
Is the battery charged and holding charge (min 13.8 V normally)?
Is the ignition timing correct?
Is there a fault on the coil?
Is there a fault on the Low Tension circuit?
Has the distributer Cap got tracking marks?
Plug Gaps OK?
Are the sparks from the HT circuit nice and blue in color?
Is the "black Brain box" functioning correctly?
 For (2)
Is the air filter clean?
If Carbs are fitted are jets Ok?
If Carbs are fitted ae the diaphrams Ok?
If fuel injection are the injectors OK?
Slow Running set ok on idle?
Fuel filter clean?
Fuel pump functioning?

Hope these help 

Aug 01, 2010 | 1994 Honda Civic

2 Answers

1991 honda civic wagon. would not restart after


SOUND LIKE ENGINE IS FLOODING. FUEL INJECTORS IS LEAKING FUEL WITH ENGINE OFF.TRY FILLING GAS TANK UP.AND PUT A BOTTLE OF FUEL INJECTION CLEANER IN GAS TANK DRIVE AROUND A LITTLE SO THE CLEANER CAN CLEAN INJECTORS.

Sep 10, 2009 | 1991 Honda Civic

1 Answer

Truck turns over trys to start then wont


The amount of fuel delivered to a properly functioning injected car is determined by sensors mounted throughout the vehicles air intake system. These sensors work together along with the ecu to control the fuel / air mix delivered to the cylinders.
We would need to isolate the components that have impact on the duration of time the injectors stay open. In troubleshooting it is often best to work backwards.
1. Injectors - Are they leaking
2. Pressure regulator - is the pressure at the fuel rail the right pressure?? (40psi for most fuel injected cars)
3. TPS- throttle position sensor- is this reading accurately...there are several different styles of these
4. Air flow meter - these also come in several varieties varys from mass air sensor / simple vane meters.
5. during startup there is a seperate circuit called the throttle bypass valve - this also may not be functioning if the flooding is occuring rapidly during startup. If the car starts and runs for a while than floods. this is probably not the culprit.
6. ultimately the ECU could have a problem as it is the link in the chain that ties everything together....though not likely.
Any of these these would have the potential to flood a vehicle if they were not functioning properly.
The amount of fuel delivered to a properly functioning injected car is determined by sensors mounted throughout the vehicles air intake system. These sensors work together along with the ecu to control the fuel / air mix delivered to the cylinders.
We would need to isolate the components that have impact on the duration of time the injectors stay open. In troubleshooting it is often best to work backwards.
1. Injectors - Are they leaking
2. Pressure regulator - is the pressure at the fuel rail the right pressure?? (40psi for most fuel injected cars)
3. TPS- throttle position sensor- is this reading accurately...there are several different styles of these
4. Air flow meter - these also come in several varieties varys from mass air sensor / simple vane meters.
5. during startup there is a seperate circuit called the throttle bypass valve - this also may not be functioning if the flooding is occuring rapidly during startup. If the car starts and runs for a while than floods. this is probably not the culprit.
6. ultimately the ECU could have a problem as it is the link in the chain that ties everything together....though not likely.
Any of these these would have the potential to flood a vehicle if they were not functioning properly. I would run a diagnostic check on your vechile to isolate your exact problem

Aug 14, 2009 | 1997 Toyota T100

4 Answers

My Honda Civic 1994 cuts out as I am driving


You are going to need a new distributor. These are such a common problem that they are available, new from any auto parts store. It's possible that you may have just a bad module or coil or pick-up, but if you just replace one of these after hours of trying to pin it down, another will fail eventually. A new distributor is not that expensive and it has all of these parts inside of it.

Apr 25, 2009 | 1994 Honda Civic

1 Answer

1997 honda civic 1.6 revving up and down


well there could be couple problems happened to mine only cuz the troddle position sensor wasn't working properly. so while idling the rpms would go up and down then sometime shut off eventually. but when you mean rev up and down you mean idling irregular? if so your timing belt and or pulley's worn fuel pump not delievering enuff fuel to fuel injection system, leaking egr valve, or even the air filter clogged.

Dec 06, 2008 | 1997 Honda Civic

1 Answer

1994 Honda Civic - Ferrio


If it is carb version check if auto choke is getting power. If fuel injection replace temp sensor (common fault).

Jun 11, 2008 | 1994 Honda Civic

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