Question about 1992 Subaru Loyale

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My relative has a subaru loyale 92. He was thinking that maybe his distributor rotor is bad so I decided to help him. I ended up just replacing the whole distributor. He had an identical spare parts car. I didn't realize however that things are not as simple as take one thing out and put other thing in so now i am in a pickle. Not enough money to tow it to a real mechanic as we live way out. Problem: I didn't mark where the rotor was on the old distributor so I am afraid the timing will be off and mess up the engine. I can follow proper directions if they are given and set the engine to TDC but I can't tell which is number 1 cylinder and I don't know where to look for the timing marks. Where could I find this information and step by step instruction? The manuals available for customers in stores are really crappy. Any help is appreciated. Thank you.

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  • Subaru Master
  • 2,984 Answers

Okay, first, here is the picture for your engine that shows you the distributor and it's position and the #1 cylinder position.


My relative has a subaru - c17hydro_80.gif

1.6L and 1.8L engines Firing Order: 1-3-2-4 Distributor Rotation: Counterclockwise


Here is a photo of the timing marks for the 1.8L engine that you have:



c17hydro_81.gif

Timing marks-1.6L and 1.8L engines, except XT models


On 1.6L and 1.8L engines except XT models, the ignition timing marks are located on the edge of the flywheel, at the rear of the engine. The marks mounted on the flywheel are visible through a port in the flywheel housing located just behind the oil dipstick tube. A plastic cover protects the port through which the flywheel-mounted marks are visible.

The ignition timing marks on XT models (1.8L and 2.7L engines), are located on the right front side of the engine, near the crankshaft pulley.


Since I am running out of room on this post to you, I am posting a second reply to you with the explanation of setting the timing.


Please let me know if this is helping you. Thanks!

Posted on Jan 01, 2011

  • Greg Bernett
    Greg Bernett Jan 01, 2011

    Ignition timing is the measurement, in degrees of crankshaft rotation, of the point at which the spark plugs fire in the cylinders. It is measured in degrees before or after Top Dead Center (TDC) of the compression stroke.

    Because it takes a fraction of a second for the spark plug to ignite the mixture in the cylinder, the spark plug must fire a little before the piston reaches TDC. Otherwise, the mixture will not be completely ignited as the piston passes TDC and the full power of the explosion will not be used by the engine.

    The timing measurement is given in degrees of crankshaft rotation before the piston reaches TDC (BTDC). If the setting for the ignition timing is 8° BTDC, the spark plug must fire 8° before each piston reaches TDC. This only holds true, however, when the engine is at idle speed.

    As the engine speed increases, the pistons go faster. The spark plugs have to ignite the fuel even sooner if it is to be completely ignited when the piston reaches TDC. To do this, the distributor has two means to advance the timing of the spark as the engine speed increases: a set of centrifugal weights within the distributor, and a vacuum diaphragm, mounted on the side of the distributor.

    If the ignition is set too far advanced (BTDC), the ignition and expansion of the fuel in the cylinder will occur too soon and tend to force the piston down while it is still traveling up. This causes engine ping. If the ignition spark is set too far retarded, after TDC (ATDC), the piston will have already passed TDC and started on its way down when the fuel is ignited. This will cause the piston to be forced down for only a portion of its travel. This results in poor engine performance and lack of power.

    Timing marks consist of a scale of degrees on the flywheel and a pointer on the flywheel cover hole. The scale corresponds to the position of the flywheel and a pointer on the flywheel cover hole. The pointer corresponds to the position of the piston in the number 1 cylinder. A stroboscopic (dynamic) timing light is used, which is hooked into the circuit of the No. 1 cylinder spark plug. Every time the spark plug fires, the timing light flashes. By aiming the timing light at the timing marks, the exact position of the piston within the cylinder can be read, since the stroboscopic flash makes the mark appear to be standing still. Proper timing is indicated when the pointer is aligned with the correct number on the scale.



    If your Subaru has electronic ignition, you should use a timing light with an inductive pickup. This pickup simply clamps onto the No. 1 plug wire, eliminating the adapter. It is not susceptible to crossfiring or false triggering, which may occur with a conventional light, due to the greater voltages produced by electronic ignition.





    Ignition timing is the measurement, in degrees of crankshaft rotation, of the point at which the spark plugs fire in the cylinders. It is measured in degrees before or after Top Dead Center (TDC) of the compression stroke.

    Because it takes a fraction of a second for the spark plug to ignite the mixture in the cylinder, the spark plug must fire a little before the piston reaches TDC. Otherwise, the mixture will not be completely ignited as the piston passes TDC and the full power of the explosion will not be used by the engine.

    The timing measurement is given in degrees of crankshaft rotation before the piston reaches TDC (BTDC). If the setting for the ignition timing is 8° BTDC, the spark plug must fire 8° before each piston reaches TDC. This only holds true, however, when the engine is at idle speed.

    As the engine speed increases, the pistons go faster. The spark plugs have to ignite the fuel even sooner if it is to be completely ignited when the piston reaches TDC. To do this, the distributor has two means to advance the timing of the spark as the engine speed increases: a set of centrifugal weights within the distributor, and a vacuum diaphragm, mounted on the side of the distributor.

    If the ignition is set too far advanced (BTDC), the ignition and expansion of the fuel in the cylinder will occur too soon and tend to force the piston down while it is still traveling up. This causes engine ping. If the ignition spark is set too far retarded, after TDC (ATDC), the piston will have already passed TDC and started on its way down when the fuel is ignited. This will cause the piston to be forced down for only a portion of its travel. This results in poor engine performance and lack of power.

    Timing marks consist of a scale of degrees on the flywheel and a pointer on the flywheel cover hole. The scale corresponds to the position of the flywheel and a pointer on the flywheel cover hole. The pointer corresponds to the position of the piston in the number 1 cylinder. A stroboscopic (dynamic) timing light is used, which is hooked into the circuit of the No. 1 cylinder spark plug. Every time the spark plug fires, the timing light flashes. By aiming the timing light at the timing marks, the exact position of the piston within the cylinder can be read, since the stroboscopic flash makes the mark appear to be standing still. Proper timing is indicated when the pointer is aligned with the correct number on the scale.


    If your Subaru has electronic ignition, you should use a timing light with an inductive pickup. This pickup simply clamps onto the No. 1 plug wire, eliminating the adapter. It is not susceptible to crossfiring or false triggering, which may occur with a conventional light, due to the greater voltages produced by electronic ignition.

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