Question about 1998 Chevrolet Cavalier

1 Answer

P0342 code: low voltage...Cam position sensor. I turn on the ignition without starting the car. I test the voltage to the power and ground. I get nothing. I test the resistance of the wires to make sure voltage can go through. They can. Does the PCM power the cam sensor? Meaning if the PCM is shorted does that mean no power goes to the sensor? I have a 1998 Cavalier 2.4L

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Sergeant:

    An expert that has over 500 points.

    Champion:

    An expert who has answered 200 questions.

  • Expert
  • 222 Answers

If your car turns on may be the tester is not good.

or you need a regulator for alternator.

Posted on Dec 31, 2010

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of.(from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones)
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

I have 2005 Tahoe 5.3L with P0342 code. I changed the camshaft position sensor and the battery is only 3 weeks old.


DTC P0342 Camshaft Position (CMP) Sensor Circuit Low Voltage

Without testing i'd only be guessing , but i'd say you have a wiring problem or bad PCM .

The camshaft position (CMP) sensor works in conjunction with a 1 X reluctor wheel on the camshaft. The powertrain control module (PCM) provides a 12-volt reference to the CMP sensor as well as a low reference and a signal circuit.
As the camshaft rotates, the reluctor wheel interrupts a magnetic field produced by a magnet within the sensor. The sensors internal circuitry detects this and produces a signal which the PCM reads.
The CMP sensor 1 X signal is used by the PCM to determine if the cylinder at top dead center (TDC) is on the firing stroke or the exhaust stroke. The PCM can determine TDC for all cylinders by using the crankshaft position (CKP) sensor 24 X signal alone. The engine will start without a CMP signal as long as the PCM receives the CKP sensor 24 X signal. A slightly longer cranking time may be a symptom of this condition. The system attempts synchronization and looks for an increase in engine speed indicating that the engine started. If the PCM does not detect an increase in engine speed, the PCM assumes that the PCM incorrectly synchronized to the exhaust stroke and re-syncs to the opposite cam position. If the PCM detects that a CMP signal is constantly low, DTC P0342 sets.

This step tests the CMP sensor signal circuit. Applying a voltage causes the CMP sensor high to low and low to high parameter to increase if the circuit and the PCM are operating properly.
Step
Action
Yes
No
Schematic Reference: Engine Controls Schematics
Connector End View Reference: Engine Controls Connector End Views or Powertrain Control Module Connector End Views
1
Did you perform the Diagnostic System Check - Vehicle?
YES - Go to Step 2
NO - Go to Diagnostic System Check - Vehicle
2
Start the engine.
Observe the camshaft position (CMP) sensor high to low and low to high transition parameter with a scan tool.
Does the scan tool parameter increment?
YES - Go to Step 3
NO - Go to Step 4
3
Observe the Freeze Frame/Failure Records for this DTC.
Turn OFF the ignition for 30 seconds.
Start the engine.
Operate the vehicle within the Conditions for Running the DTC. You may also operate the vehicle within the conditions that you observed from the Freeze Frame/Failure Records.
Did the DTC fail this ignition?
YES - Go to Step 4
NO - Go to Testing for Intermittent Conditions and Poor Connections
4
Turn OFF the ignition.
Disconnect the CMP sensor.
Turn ON the ignition, with the engine OFF.
Measure the voltage between the 12-volt reference circuit of the CMP sensor and a good ground.
Did you measure greater than 9.5 volts?
YES - Go to Step 5
NO - Go to Step 6
5
Start the engine.
Observe the CMP sensor high to low and low to high transition parameters with the scan tool.
Momentarily and repeatedly probe the signal circuit of the CMP sensor with a test lamp that is connected to battery voltage.
Does the CMP sensor high to low and low to high transition counters increment when the test lamp contacts the signal circuit?
YES - Go to Step 8
NO - Go to Step 7
6
Test the 12-volt reference circuit for an open or high resistance. Refer to Circuit Testing and Wiring Repairs.
Did you find and correct the condition?
YES - Go to Step 14
NO - Go to Step 9
7
Test the CMP sensor signal circuit for an open or a short to ground. Refer to Circuit Testing and Wiring Repairs.
Did you find and correct the condition?
YES - Go to Step 14
NO - Go to Step 9
8
Test for an intermittent and for a poor connection at the CMP sensor. Refer to Testing for Intermittent Conditions and Poor Connections and Connector Repairs.
Did you find and correct the condition?
YES - Go to Step 14
NO - Go to Step 10
9
Test for an intermittent and for a poor connection at the powertrain control module (PCM). Refer to Testing for Intermittent Conditions and Poor Connections and Connector Repairs.
Did you find and correct the condition?
YES - Go to Step 14
NO - Go to Step 13
10
Remove the CMP sensor. Refer to Camshaft Position Sensor Replacement.
Visually inspect the CMP sensor for the following conditions:
• Physical damage
• Loose or improper installation
• Wiring routed too close to the secondary ignition components
• The sensor coming in contact with the reluctor ring
• Foreign material passing between the sensor and the reluctor ring
Did you find and correct the condition?
YES - Go to Step 14
NO - Go to Step 11
11
Visually inspect the CMP sensor reluctor ring for the following conditions:
• Physical damage
• Loose or improper installation
• Excessive end play or looseness
Refer to Camshaft and Bearings Cleaning and Inspection.
Did you find and correct the condition?
YES - Go to Step 14
NO - Go to Step 12
12
Replace the CMP sensor. Refer to Camshaft Position Sensor Replacement.
YES - Did you complete the replacement?
NO - Go to Step 14
--
13
Replace the PCM. Refer to Control Module References for replacement, setup, and programming.
YES - Did you complete the replacement?
NO - Go to Step 14
--
14
Clear the DTCs with a scan tool.
Turn OFF the ignition for 30 seconds.
Start the engine.
Operate the vehicle within the Conditions for Running the DTC. You may also operate the vehicle within the conditions that you observed from the Freeze Frame/Failure Records.
Did the DTC fail this ignition?
YES - Go to Step 2
NO - Go to Step 15
15
Observe the Capture Info with a scan tool.
Are there any DTCs that have not been diagnosed?
YES - Go to Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) List - Vehicle
NO - System OK

This is a factory diagnostic flow chart for DTC P0342 . Before replacing a sensor of any kind diagnostic's must be done . We do not assume it is the sensor , especially if the discription has sensor circuit low or high .

Mar 11, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 2006 kia optima that keeps shutting off on me and gives me codes p0342 p0303 and a random cylinder misfire code I changed spark plugs, wires, and coil packs also the cmp sensor still after a month...


To clarify, the code 303 means cylinder is not producing power, which is not the same thing as not having spark.
Code 342 means the signal voltage from the cam sensor is low. If you have a V6 engine, you have two cam sensors. And the problem could be in the wiring or the actual camshaft instead of the sensor. The sensor for both heads would need to be tested to find the problem.

Feb 21, 2015 | Kia Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

03 Chevy 2500HD 6.0 Gas I have no power to the 10A fuse for the crank with the key on or off truck does start. A P0342 code keep coming up


code p0342 refers to cam shaft position (CMP) sensor A bank 1 --low input===causes--wiring short to ground---CMP sensor---ECM
Check for wiring shorting out on the engine /body, replace the cam sensor on bank 1

Jan 31, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

WHAT DOES daewoo p0342 IMPLY?


code p0342 refers to camshaft position sensor(CMP) sensor A bank 1 --low input== causes wiring short to ground--CMP sensor--ECM
check wiring and connections , replace the position sensor

Aug 12, 2014 | 1999 Daewoo Lanos

1 Answer

2004 tahoe hard startig OB 2 code P0342 showing


Yes that would do it.
Someone would need to test the sensor and the wiring to see if the sensor has failed.

Sep 30, 2012 | 2004 Chevrolet Tahoe

3 Answers

I ran a code on my 99 dodge ram 1500 and it came back with " no cam signal at pcm" what does that mean exactly


Hi, the camshaft position sensor signal is not reaching the powertrain control module. This can be a problem with the sensor, the connector, or the wiring. The sensor is inside the distributor. See figure below and some test procedures you can try from Autozone.com. Please let me know if you have more questions, and thanks for using FixYa.

jturcotte_695.gif


TESTING
To completely test this sensor and circuitry, you need the DRBII scan tool, or equivalent. This is a test of the camshaft position sensor only.
For this test you will need an analog (non-digital) voltmeter. Do NOT remove the distributor connector. Using small paper clips, insert them into the backside of the distributor wire harness connector to make contact with the terminals. Do NOT damage the connector when inserting the paper clips. Attach the voltmeter leads to these clips.

  1. Connect the positive voltmeter lead to the sensor output wire.
  2. Connect the negative voltmeter lead to the ground wire.

jturcotte_696.gif

        Fig. Camshaft Position Sensor circuit schematic
        jturcotte_697.gif
        Fig. Camshaft Position Sensor wires: (1) ORN (5v supply), (2) BK/LB (sensor ground), (3) TN/YL (camshaft position sensor signal)

        1. Turn the ignition ON . Rotate the engine. The meter should show a reading of less than 1 volt and a high voltage reading of 5.0 volts as the high and low points on the wheel pass the sensor.
        2. If there is no voltage reading at all, check the meter connections.
        3. If voltage is still not present, check for voltage at the supply wire.
        4. If 5.0 volts is not found at the supply wire, check for voltage at cavity A-17 of the 32-way connector. Leave the engine controller harness connected for this test.
        NOTE If voltage is not found at the PCM connector, you will need to diagnose the system using a DRBII scan tool, or equivalent, or take the vehicle to a qualified shop.

        1. If voltage is present at the engine controller connector, but not the supply wire:
          1. Check continuity between the sensor and supply wire. This is checked between the distributor connector and cavity A-17 . If continuity is not present, repair the wire harness.
          2. Check for continuity between the camshaft position sensor output wire and cavity A-18 at the engine controller. If continuity is not present, repair the wire harness.
          3. Check for continuity between the ground circuit wire at the distributor connector and ground. If continuity is not present, repair the wire harness.

        2. Crank the engine while observing the voltmeter. The voltmeter needle should fluctuate 0-5 volts, approximately. This will verify the camshaft position sensor is operating properly and a sync pulse signal is being generated.
        3. If a sync pulse signal is not detected, and all other variables have been eliminated, replace the camshaft position sensor.

        Jan 02, 2011 | 1999 Dodge Ram

        1 Answer

        I am trying to test the crank sensor on my 99 intrepid and need to know how to test


        No-Start Diagnosis
        The diagnostic procedure for EI (electronic ignition) systems varies depending on the vehicle make and model year. Always follow the procedure recommended in the vehicle manufacturer's service manual.
        The following procedure is based on Chrysler EI systems. The crankshaft timing sensor and camshaft reference sensor in these systems are modified Hall-effect switches.
        If a crank or cam sensor fails, the engine will not start. both of these sensor circuits can be checked with a voltmeter or lab scope.
        If the sensors are receiving the correct amount of voltage and have good low-resistance ground circuits, their output should be a pulsing digital signal or voltmeter reading while the engine is cranking.
        If any of these conditions do not exist, the circuit needs to be repaired or the sensor needs to be replaced. When the engine fails to start, follow these steps:
        1. Check for fault codes 11 and 43.
          • Code 11, "Ignition Reference Signal," could be caused by a defective camshaft reference signal or crankshaft timing sensor signal.
          • Code 43 is caused by low primary current in coil number 1, 2 or 3.
        2. With the engine cranking, check the voltage from the orange wire to ground on the crankshaft timing sensor and the camshaft reference sensor. fr_24.13.gif Crankshaft timing and camshaft reference sensor terminals.
          • Over 7V is satisfactory.
          • If the voltage is less than specified, repeat the test with the voltmeter connected from PCM (powertrain control module) terminal 7 to ground.
          • If the voltage is satisfactory at terminal 7 but low at the sensor orange wire, repair the open circuit or high resistance in the orange wire.
          • If the voltage is low at terminal 7, the PCM may need replacement.
            • Be sure 12V are supplied to the PCM terminal 3 with the ignition switch off or on, and 12 V must be supplied to PCM terminal 9 with the ignition switch on.
            • Check PCM ground connections on terminals 11 and 12 before PCM replacement.
        3. With the ignition switch on, check the voltage drop across the ground circuit (black/light blue wire) on the crankshaft timing sensor and the camshaft reference sensor.
          • A reading below 0.2V is satisfactory.
        NOTE When using a digital voltmeter to check a crankshaft or camshaft sensor signal, crank the engine a very small amount at a time and observe the voltmeter. The voltmeter reading should cycle from almost 0 volts to a highter voltage of about 5 volts. Since digital voltmeters do not react instantly, it is difficult to see the change in voltmeter reading if the engine is cranked continually.
        1. If the readings in the previous two steps are satisfactory, connect a lab scope or digital voltmeter from the gray/black wire on the crankshaft timing sensor and the tan/yellow wire on the camshaft reference sensor to ground. fr_24.14.gif Lab scope patterns from the camshaft and crankshaft position sensors.
          • When the engine is cranking, a digital pattern should be displayed or the voltmeter should cycle between 0 and 5 volts.
          • If the voltage does not cycle, sensor replacement is required.
          • Each sensor voltage signal should cycle from low voltage to high voltage as the engine is cranked.
        A no-start condition can occur if the PCM "locks up."
        • In step 2 above, if 0 volts is indicated the PCM may be faulty or it may be locked up.
        • If the PCM is locked up it will not store a fault code for the reason.
        • Basically, the PCM will lock up when it goes into a safeguard routine if the 9-volt or 5-volt reference voltage shorts to ground. This shuts down the PCM to protect it. Since it shuts down, no DTCs (Diagnostic trouble code) are stored.
        • The engine will not start as long as the ground is present. An intermittent ground will cause the engine to stop running.
        • Attempting to restart the engine without cycling the ignition switch to the full LOCK position will not start the engine, even if the ground is lifted.
          • Cycle the ignition switch to the LOCK position and wait about 5 to 10 seconds.
          • If the ground is lifted, the PCM will reset and the engine will start and run until the ground occurs again.
        • On 1996 and new SBEC III and JTEC engine controllers, there are two 5-volt reference signals. The sensors that require 5 volts are separated, thus If this signal shorts to ground the engine will still stop running, but for the first time a DTC can be set.
        • Also note, if the 9-volt reference voltage is opened, there will be no DTC stored for the crankshaft or camshaft positions sensors. With an open circuit the PCM cannot tell if the engine is cranking or not. The diagnostic routing does not begin until the PCM senses engine cranking.

        Nov 10, 2009 | 1999 Dodge Intrepid

        2 Answers

        I have a Hyundai 2000 Accent GL. Problem, engine check light stays on. Codes that came up are P0342 and P0460, do not know what these codes are or where they are located on car, please help.


        It's quite likely that you have an open circuit between the fuel sender harness and the chassis ground. This would cause this combination of DTC's as the ground is a common point for both of these components.

        With the key on, engine off, disconnect the cam position sensor wire (3 pin connector) and check the ground for resistance between pin 3 and a chassis ground. You should have less than 1 ohm of resistance. If not then a ground issue is your problem, either obtain a schematic from www.hmaservice.com for your vehicle and check the wire for resistance at each connector from the CMP (cam position sensor) to the ground, or take your vehicle to a local Hyundai dealer who will have the resources to do so correctly in the shortest amount of time.

        Cam position sensors go bad, but very infrequently. We see many more Crank position sensors (people confuse the two quite frequently) go bad. In your case, the cam position sensor would be located on top of the cylinder head, not in the engine block. It's located between the valve cover (the very top of the engine, the oil cap is on it) and the coil pack (the thing on the right with the spark plug wires). The connecter between them is what you need to check. Any digital voltage and ohm meter (DVOM) will due. Pin 1 should be 12 volts DC, pin 2 should be 5 volts DC, and I mentioned how to check the ground.

        If you get stuck, take it to a dealer. Pin 2 on this connecter goes directly to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module) and you don't want to cook that by shorting it to 12 volts.

        Good luck!

        Good luck!

        Nov 05, 2009 | 2000 Hyundai Accent

        1 Answer

        What does a P0342 code mean?


        hallo
        P0342 code means: camshaft position sensor- low imput. Check wiring (short to earth), if OK change camshaft position sensor.
        Marko

        Oct 08, 2009 | 2002 Daewoo Lanos

        1 Answer

        Stalling,check engine light cam shaft sensor position A code


        the code for camshaft sensor is--p0341 and p0342, po341 is camshaft range or performance problem. p0342 is camshaft curcuit , low input. hope this helps carl.

        Jul 28, 2009 | 2004 Dodge Intrepid

        Not finding what you are looking for?
        1998 Chevrolet Cavalier Logo

        734 people viewed this question

        Ask a Question

        Usually answered in minutes!

        Top Chevrolet Experts

        yadayada
        yadayada

        Level 3 Expert

        76691 Answers

        Colin Stickland
        Colin Stickland

        Level 3 Expert

        22219 Answers

        Jeffrey Turcotte
        Jeffrey Turcotte

        Level 3 Expert

        8531 Answers

        Are you a Chevrolet Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

        Answer questions

        Manuals & User Guides

        Loading...