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Changed the map sensor & connector. it will idle but can't get it to accelerate

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Since we don't have any trouble codes to work with, I would recommend that you replace the throttle position sensor and the mass airflow sensor.

Posted on Dec 31, 2010

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What could cause a 2002 pt cruiser to have a rough idle, cylinder 1 misfire, and bogging upon acceleration?


AIR & FUEL FILTERS NEED CHANGED, MAP SENSOR CAN BE FAULTY ! PUT SOME FUEL INJECTOR CLEANER IN TANK, THE GOOD STUFF ! DO ALL THIS, SEE HOW IT DOES .

Mar 26, 2013 | 2002 Chrysler PT Cruiser

1 Answer

ENGINE POWER REDUCED FOR 2006 PONTIAC G5 PERSUIT


Had this problem after getting water into the air intake.

Searched the net, and here a a host of suggestions.

***********************

FROM THE NET
i know the 300 code is cylinder misfire... i had that issue, are you using the stock delcos?
P0171- this is a lean code. are you using 89-91 gas when you should only be using 87? that could do it.
P0106-The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) uses the Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor (MAP) to monitor engine load. (NOTE: Some vehicles have a Barometric Pressure (BARO) sensor that is integral to the Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensor and do not have a MAP sensor. Other vehicles have a MAF/BARO and a redundant MAP sensor where the MAP sensor functions as a backup input in case of MAF failure.) The PCM supplies a 5 Volt reference signal to the MAP sensor. Usually the PCM also supplies a ground circuit to the MAP sensor as well. As the manifold pressure changes with load, the MAP sensor input informs the PCM. At idle the voltage should be 1 to 1.5 Volts and approximately 4.5 Volts at Wide Open Throttle (WOT). The PCM looks for any change in manifold pressure to be preceded by a change in engine load in the form of changes in throttle angle, engine speed, or Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) flow. If the PCM doesn't see any of these factors change while detecting a rapid change in MAP value, it will set a P0106.
Potential Symptoms
The following could be symptomatic of a P0106:
* Engine runs rough
* Black smoke at tailpipe
* Engine will not idle
* Poor fuel economy
* Engine misses at speed
A P0106 could be caused by:
* Bad MAP sensor
* Water/dirt intrusion affecting MAP sensor connector
* Intermittent open in the reference, ground, or signal wire for the MAP sensor
* Intermittent short in the reference, ground, or signal wire for the MAP sensor
* Ground problem due to corrosion causing intermittent signal problem
* A break in the flexible air intake duct between the MAF and the intake manifold
* Bad PCM (do not assume the PCM is bad until you've exhausted all other possibilities)
Possible Solutions
Using a scan tool, watch the MAP sensor value with the key on, engine off. Compare the BARO reading with the MAP reading. They should be roughly equal. The voltage for the MAP sensor should read approx. 4.5 volts. Now start the engine and look for a significant drop in the MAP sensor voltage indicating the MAP sensor is working.
If the MAP reading doesn't change perform the following:
1. With the Key on, engine off, disconnect the vacuum hose from the MAP sensor. Using a vacuum pump, pull 20 in. of vacuum on the MAP sensor. Does the voltage drop? It should. If it doesn't inspect the MAP sensor vacuum port and vacuum hose to manifold for a restriction of some kind. Repair or replace as necessary.
2. If there are no restrictions, and the value doesn't change with vacuum, then perform the following: with the Key on and engine off and the MAP sensor unplugged, check for 5 Volts at the reference wire to the MAP sensor connector with a Digital Voltmeter. If there is none, check for reference voltage at the PCM connector. If the reference voltage is present at the PCM connector but not the MAP connector, check for open or short in the reference wire between MAP and PCM and retest.
3. If reference voltage is present, then check for existing ground at the MAP sensor connector. If it isn't present then repair open/short in the ground circuit.
4. If ground is present, then replace MAP sensor.
1) I drive a 2006 Pontiac G5. Just recently, it started going in to Reduced engine power, meaning that I was and STILL am not able to accelerate.
Anyways, the mechanics at my local GM delarship told me "If the car wasn't in reduced engine power at the time, they couldn't tell what code it was and therfore were unable to idenitify what the actually problem was". So as a shot in the dark, it was reccommended that I replace the pedal accelerator, which I did. All but gtwo days late, reduced engine power yet again.
However, THIS TIME, when it went in to reduced engine power I was close to the dealership and actually took it in and left in running so that the mechanic could sit in it. Anyways, after a codes test, it was then determined that I needed to replace my ECM. This was done, and no less then a week later, reduced engine power AGAIN.
I took the car in, and the mechanic literally shrugged and said that GM mechanics have no idea how to fix this problem, and actually suggested that I trade in for a new car.....
From what I have been reading, this "reduced engine power" is a serious problem for GM - one that warrants a recall.
I hope I added some insight - and if anyone has any suggestions I would love to hear from you! Right now I stuck with a 4-year old lemon in my driveway
I still remember my first and only experience with reduced power it turned out to be a wire was not plugged all the way in on the transmission. If its a short in a wire causing it that's a hard problem to find give the shop some time to find it but if you are unhappy with the current shop do take it in to another one.
This is what I got from gm service information
Reduced Engine Power Mode
When the ECM detects a condition with the TAC system, the ECM may enter a reduced engine power mode. Reduced engine power may cause one or more of the following conditions:
• Acceleration limiting--The ECM will continue to use the accelerator pedal for throttle control, however, the vehicle acceleration is limited.
• Limited throttle mode--The ECM will continue to use the accelerator pedal for throttle control, however, the maximum throttle opening is limited.
• Throttle default mode--The ECM will turn OFF the throttle actuator motor and the throttle will return to the spring loaded default position.
• Forced idle mode--The ECM will perform the following actions:
- Limit engine speed to idle by positioning the throttle position, or by controlling the fuel and spark if the throttle is turned OFF
- Ignore the accelerator pedal input
• Engine shutdown mode--The ECM will disable fuel and de-energize the throttle actuator.
The tac system is the throttle actuator control
. . . THOUGHT we had it each time..
replace ECM, Body control modules, everything but the kitchen sink... then took the fuse box out to replace the whole boxx and a wire underneath it was pinched and shorting out....
solved all teh problems... moral of the story, loose wire, pinched wire, bad ground something somewhere is prolly shorting out..
Ok had to wait for the check Engine to come on again so I could check the codes. I got two codes (P1515 / P2101)!! P1516 refers to the TAC and says The ECM has detected an out of range condition between the predicted and actual throttle position. P2101 refers to the Throttle Position sensor, And says that the TP senor does not agree with the APP. It Further stated that the ECM has detected the TPS angle does not agree with the APP commanded angle.
Ok heres the deal, I took the Throttle body off, cleaned it (looks like new!!) real good and then I checked the Module on the side of it for moisture and the connection!!! Put every thing back together,and so far every thing is good ( no check engine light- no Reduced Engine Power mode,and the car is running fine!!!
Lampoon you are the man thanks again for that ON THE MONEY CALL!!!!

Jan 03, 2013 | 2006 Pontiac G5

1 Answer

2005 Mazda 6 4cyl AT Idles high after driving a while.


I would check the pedal position sensor. Do it when it's hot.
Mazda Car 2005-06
  • Accelerator Pedal Position Sensor

    Description & Operation

    A power supply is applied on the Accelerator Pedal Position (APP) Sensor (main) power terminal from the PCM. The ground terminal is grounded with PCM. When the accelerator pedal is moved from the idle position to the fully opened position, the resistance between the accelerator pedal position sensor (main) output terminal and ground terminal will increase according to the depression.
    A power supply is applied on the Accelerator Pedal Position (APP) Sensor (main) power terminal from the PCM. The ground terminal is grounded with PCM. When the accelerator pedal is moved from the idle position to the fully opened position, the resistance between the accelerator pedal position sensor (main) output terminal and ground terminal will increase according to the depression.

Testing

  1. Connect a suitable scan tool to the diagnostic connector. Select APP1 or APP2 percentage.
  2. Turn the ignition switch to the ON position.
  3. Measure the voltage at the PCM terminal and ground with connectors connected:

    APP1-8% load or 0.4 volts with the accelerator pedal releasedAPP1-60% load or 3.0 volts with the accelerator pedal depressedAPP2 -8% load or 0.4 volts with the accelerator pedal releasedAPP2 -60% load or 3.0 volts with the accelerator pedal depressed
  4. If any check above does not meet the specifications, check connectors and wiring between the sensor and PCM. If ok, replace PCM.
  5. If the measured values are outside the standard value range, or if the load % and/or voltage does not change smoothly, replace the sensor.
  1. Connect a suitable scan tool to the diagnostic connector. Select APP1 or APP2 percentage.
  2. Turn the ignition switch to the ON position.
  3. Measure the voltage at the PCM terminal and ground with connectors connected:

    APP1 %-31.0-32.4% with the accelerator pedal releasedAPP1 %-69.8-81.8% with the accelerator pedal depressedAPP2 %-20.2-21.4% with the accelerator pedal releasedAPP2 %-58.8-70.8% with the accelerator pedal depressed
  4. If any check above does not meet the specifications, check connectors and wiring between the sensor and PCM. If ok, replace PCM.
  5. If the measured values are outside the standard value range, or if the load % does not change smoothly, replace the senso

0996b43f80203317-l15fcbeisfileg1jtnhunp3x-3-0.gif

Jul 23, 2017 | 2005 Mazda 6

1 Answer

Where is the throttle position sensor on my 2004 4.2


S&T Series Blazer, Bravada, Envoy, Jimmy, Rainier, Trailblazer, Xtreme
Throttle Position Sensor (TPS)

Print


Removal & Installation

  1. Remove the idle air control (IAC) electrical connector (1) from the IAC sensor (4).
  2. Remove the manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor electrical connector from the MAP sensor.
  3. Remove the water pump belt cover.
  4. Remove the TP sensor retaining screws electrical connector (2) from the TP sensor (3).
  5. Remove the TP sensor electrical connector (2) from the TP sensor (3).

    0996b43f80202874.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

    Fig. Detaching electrical connectors prior to TP sensor removal


    0996b43f80202875.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

    Fig. Identifying components for removal of the TP Sensor


To install:
  1. Install the new O-ring on to the TP sensor.
  2. Connect the TP Sensor electrical connector (2) to the TP sensor (3).
  3. Install the TP sensor (2) on to the throttle body (1). Tighten the TP sensor screws to 2.3 Nm (20 inch lbs.).
  4. Connect the IAC electrical connector (1) to the IAC sensor (4).
  5. Connect the MAP sensor electrical connector to the MAP sensor.
  6. Install the water pump belt and tensioner cover.
  7. Perform the TP Sensor learn procedure:
  8. Turn the ignition to the RUN/ON position.
  9. Wait 1 minute.
  10. Turn the ignition to the LOCK/OFF position

Jul 31, 2012 | 2004 GMC Envoy

2 Answers

Stalls while in drive with foot on brake , changed MAP Sensor, Crank Shaft Sensor , Distributor, Fuel Pump, Fuel Filter , have ran out of ideas


I would check the IAC motor or idle air control motor, heres a little info.about the part.Stratus Sedan, 1999-2005 Idle Air Control Motor

Print


Description & Operation

Not for Dodge Stratus Sedan
The idle air control motor (IAC) attaches to the throttle body. It is an electric stepper motor. The PCM adjusts engine idle speed through the idle air control motor to compensate for engine load, coolant temperature or barometric pressure changes. The throttle body has an air bypass passage that provides air for the engine during closed throttle idle. The idle air control motor pintle protrudes into the air bypass passage and regulates airflow through it.
The PCM adjusts engine idle speed by moving the IAC motor pintle in and out of the bypass passage. The adjustments are based on inputs the PCM receives. The inputs are from the throttle position sensor, crankshaft position sensor, coolant temperature sensor, MAP sensor, vehicle speed sensor and various switch operations (brake, park/neutral, air conditioning).

0996b43f8020234f.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

Fig.

Not for Dodge Stratus Sedan
When engine rpm is above idle speed, the IAC is used for the following functions:


Off-idle dashpot Deceleration air flow control A/C compressor load control (also opens the passage slightly before the compressor is engaged so that the engine rpm does not dip down when the compressor engages)
The idle air control motor (IAC) attaches to the throttle body. It is an electric stepper motor. The PCM adjusts engine idle speed through the idle air control motor to compensate for engine load, coolant temperature or barometric pressure changes. The throttle body has an air bypass passage that provides air for the engine during closed throttle idle. The idle air control motor pintle protrudes into the air bypass passage and regulates airflow through it.
The PCM adjusts engine idle speed by moving the IAC motor pintle in and out of the bypass passage. The adjustments are based on inputs the PCM receives. The inputs are from the throttle position sensor, crankshaft position sensor, coolant temperature sensor, MAP sensor, vehicle speed sensor and various switch operations (brake, park/neutral, air conditioning).

21180_cdia_g257.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

Fig.

When engine rpm is above idle speed, the IAC is used for the following functions:


Off-idle dashpot Deceleration air flow control A/C compressor load control (also opens the passage slightly before the compressor is engaged so that the engine rpm does not dip down when the compressor engages)
Target Idle
Target idle is determined by the following inputs:


Gear position ECT Sensor Battery voltage Ambient/Battery Temperature Sensor VSS TPS MAP Sensor
Target idle is determined by the following inputs:


Gear position ECT Sensor Battery voltage Ambient/Battery Temperature Sensor VSS TPS MAP Sensor


Removal & Installation

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Disconnect the IAC electrical connector.
  3. Remove the IAC mounting screws.
  4. Remove the IAC.

To Install:
  1. Install the IAC to the throttle body.
  2. Tighten mounting screws to 5.1 Nm (45 inch lbs.) torque.
  3. Attach electrical connector to the IAC.
  4. Connect the negative battery cable.

    0996b43f80202350.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

    Fig.


  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Disconnect the IAC electrical connector.
  3. Remove the IAC mounting screws.
  4. Remove the IAC.

To Install:
  1. Install the IAC to the throttle body.
  2. Tighten mounting screws to 5.1 Nm (45 inch lbs.) torque.
  3. Attach electrical connector to the IAC.
  4. Connect the negative battery cable.

May 11, 2012 | 2000 Chrysler Cirrus

1 Answer

Engine Code P0108. The engine revs up high and back low about 10 times before idling normally when first turned on. then there is other idling issues when accelerating to hard or at a stop. Are there...


P0108 - MAP Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit High Input

The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor measures engine manifold negative air pressure. It's usually a three wire sensor: a ground wire, a 5 volt reference wire from the PCM (Powertrain Control Module) to the MAP sensor, and a signal wire that informs the PCM of the MAP sensor voltage reading as it changes. The higher the engine vacuum, the lower the voltage reading. The voltage should range between about 1 volt (at idle) to about 5 volts (WOT wide open throttle).

If the PCM sees the voltage reading from the MAP sensor is greater than 5 Volts, or if the voltage reading is higher than what the PCM considers normal under certain circumstances, a P0108 DTC will set.


Symptoms of a P0108 DTC code may include:
* MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) will likely be on
* Engine may run poorly
* Engine may not run at all
* Fuel mileage may decrease
* Presence of black smoke at exhaust


Causes: Potential causes of a P0108 code:
* Bad MAP sensor
* Leak in vacuum supply line to MAP sensor
* Engine vacuum leak
* Short on signal wire to PCM
* Short on reference voltage wire from PCM
* Open in ground circuit to MAP
* Worn engine causing low vacuum


Possible Solutions
A good way to diagnose if the MAP sensor is to blame would be to compare the KOEO (key on engine off) MAP sensor reading on a scan tool with the Barometric pressure reading. They should be the same because they both measure atmospheric pressure.

If the MAP reading is greater than 0.5 volt off of the BARO reading, then replacing the MAP sensor would likely fix the problem. Otherwise, start the engine and observe the MAP reading at idle. It should normally be about 1.5 volts (varies according to altitude).

a. If it is, the problem is likely intermittent. Check all the vacuum hoses for damage and replace as necessary. You can also try wiggle testing the harness and connector to reproduce the problem.
b. If the scan tool MAP reading is more than 4.5 volts, check the actual engine vacuum reading with the engine running. If it is less than 15 or 16 in. Hg, then the PCM is probably not seeing enough vacuum (due to a worn engine, perhaps) for a given operating condition (which causes a higher than normal voltage signal to the PCM) and setting the code. Repair the engine vacuum problem and retest.
c. But, if the actual engine vacuum reading is 16 in. Hg or more, then unplug the MAP sensor. The scan tool MAP reading should indicate that there is no voltage present. Check that the ground from the PCM is intact and also that the MAP sensor connector and terminals are tight. If the connection is good, then replace the map sensor.
d. However if, with KOEO, & the MAP sensor unplugged, the scan tool shows a voltage reading, then there may be a short in the harness to the MAP sensor. Turn the ignition off. At the PCM unplug connector and remove the MAP signal wire from the connector. Re-attach the PCM connector and see if with KOEO, the scan tool MAP reading shows voltage. If it still does, replace the PCM. If not, check for voltage on the signal wire you just removed from the PCM. If there is voltage on the signal wire, find the short in the harness and repair.


Hope helps (remember to rate this answer).

Apr 05, 2011 | 2003 Chrysler PT Cruiser

1 Answer

Code po105 pops up i had it reset and every 3-4 days it lights back up what does it mean ?


Generic code results from http://www.obd-codes.com/p0105 :

P0105 - MAP Circuit Malfunction

Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Malfunction

The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor is part of the fuel management system. It reacts to changes in engine manifold pressure. The PCM (Powertrain Control Module) monitors the MAP sensor continually to properly run the engine. Changes in engine load require changes in the amount of fuel injected, and timing of the ignition system, etc. An engine under load has more manifold pressure(or less vacuum) than an engine that is coasting. As the load changes, the MAP sensor voltage signal to the PCM changes accordingly. To check the MAP sensor operation, though, the PCM watches other sensors to verify that the MAP sensor is working properly.

For example, the PCM compares the TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) signal to the MAP signal to verify the MAP signal isn't "sticking". If the PCM doesn't see a MAP sensor change immediately follow a change in the throttle pedal sensor, it knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor and sets P0105. Or, if the PCM notices that the TPS indicates the engine is under load, but the MAP signal indicates that the engine is "coasting" it, again, knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor or TPS and sets P0105.

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Symptoms of a P0105 check engine light code may include:

  • Poor running engine
  • Engine runs rich
  • Engine won't idle
  • Engine backfires through tailpipe
  • Engine misfire under load or at idle
  • MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
  • In some extreme cases there may be no symptoms other than MIL illumination

A P0105 DTC could be caused by:

  • MAP sensor vacuum hose disconnected or plugged
  • Bad MAP sensor
  • Bad TPS
  • Damaged or problematic MAP sensor connector
  • Damaged or problematic TPS connector
  • Damaged wiring
  • Short to reference voltage on signal circuit of MAP sensor
  • Loss of ground to MAP sensor or TPS
  • Open on signal circuit of MAP sensor
  • Bad PCM

Using a scanner or code reader, turn the ignition on and engine OFF; what does the MAP sensor voltage read? It should be about 4 Volts for sea level. If you are at a higher altitude, it should decrease about half a volt or so for each 1,000 ft. of altitude (this will vary from model to model) Or if you have a separate MAF (Mass air flow) sensor on your vehicle, they are usually equipped with a Barometric pressure reading. If so, the Baro reading should match the MAP reading (they both measure ambient air pressure). If they're roughly equal, then, check for Freeze Frame data of the MAP sensor (if available).

NOTE: Freeze Frame data is the PCM recording a fault when it happens. It captures the readings of the various PIDS (parameter identifiers)available to troubleshoot what happened. It's like a recording of the problem as it happened. At idle a typical MAP sensor Voltage reading should be about a volt, and at WOT (wide open throttle) it should approach 4.5 to 5 Volts. As for the TPS, at idle, the voltage reading is about 1 Volt or less. As the throttle is opened the reading will increase to 4.5 Volts at WOT. Do the two readings make sense? For example, if the TPS reading on Freeze Frame data shows 2.5 Volts (indicating partial throttle) does the MAP sensor indicate a reading that isn't at either extreme? Using the Freeze Frame data (if available) compare the MAP reading to the TPS when the problem occurred. This can help you identify what happened

If you have no access to Freeze Frame data then check if the MAP sensor voltage changes when you apply vacuum to it. You can do this by mouth or a vacuum pump. The voltage should increase as you apply vacuum. If the reading doesn't change as you apply vacuum, make sure there are no obstructions in the hose to the sensor. If the hose is clear, the MAP sensor is usually bad, but it doesn't rule out the following from causing the problem: Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at less than .5 Volts? Then:

NOTE: This code shouldn't set if the MAP is stuck at extremely low voltage, however, I'm adding it in because there's no way to know for certain for which vehicles a low voltage condition may set a P0105.

  1. Inspect the wiring harness and MAP sensor connector. Repair any damage
  2. Unplug the MAP sensor connector. Also, at the PCM connector, remove the MAP sensor signal wire and check for continuity to the MAP sensor connector. If there is infinite resistance, then repair open in MAP signal circuit. If the signal wire has continuity to the MAP sensor connector, then check for 5 volt reference voltage to the connector and a good ground. If both are present, then re-install all removed wiring and replace the MAP sensor.

Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at full 4.5 voltage? Then:

  1. Inspect the wiring harness for damage. Repair as needed
  2. Remove the MAP sensor signal wire from the PCM connector. With a voltmeter measure the voltage with KEY ON ENGINE OFF. Is there 4.5 Volts? If so, unplug the MAP sensor and recheck. If it is still present, then repair short between the signal wire and 5 volt reference wire.
  3. If unplugging the MAP sensor causes the voltage to disappear, check that the ground is intact. If it is, then replace the MAP sensor due to internal short.

Feb 27, 2011 | Jaguar X-Type Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have this eobd code problem p0105 in my elantra, where those sensors?


P0105 - Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Malfunction
The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor is part of the fuel management system. It reacts to changes in engine manifold pressure. The PCM (Powertrain Control Module) monitors the MAP sensor continually to properly run the engine. Changes in engine load require changes in the amount of fuel injected, and timing of the ignition system, etc. An engine under load has more manifold pressure(or less vacuum) than an engine that is coasting. As the load changes, the MAP sensor voltage signal to the PCM changes accordingly. To check the MAP sensor operation, though, the PCM watches other sensors to verify that the MAP sensor is working properly.

For example, the PCM compares the TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) signal to the MAP signal to verify the MAP signal isn't "sticking". If the PCM doesn't see a MAP sensor change immediately follow a change in the throttle pedal sensor, it knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor and sets P0105. Or, if the PCM notices that the TPS indicates the engine is under load, but the MAP signal indicates that the engine is "coasting" it, again, knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor or TPS and sets P0105.

Symptoms of a P0105 check engine light code may include:
* Poor running engine
* Engine runs rich
* Engine won't idle
* Engine backfires through tailpipe
* Engine misfire under load or at idle
* MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
* In some extreme cases there may be no symptoms other than MIL illumination

Causes: A P0105 DTC could be caused by:
* MAP sensor vacuum hose disconnected or plugged
* Bad MAP sensor
* Bad TPS
* Damaged or problematic MAP sensor connector
* Damaged or problematic TPS connector
* Damaged wiring
* Short to reference voltage on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Loss of ground to MAP sensor or TPS
* Open on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Bad PCM

Possible Solutions:
Using a scanner or code reader, turn the ignition on and engine OFF; what does the MAP sensor voltage read? It should be about 4 Volts for sea level. If you are at a higher altitude, it should decrease about half a volt or so for each 1,000 ft. of altitude (this will vary from model to model) Or if you have a separate MAF (Mass air flow) sensor on your vehicle, they are usually equipped with a Barometric pressure reading. If so, the Baro reading should match the MAP reading (they both measure ambient air pressure). If they're roughly equal, then, check for Freeze Frame data of the MAP sensor (if available).

NOTE: Freeze Frame data is the PCM recording a fault when it happens. It captures the readings of the various PIDS (parameter identifiers)available to troubleshoot what happened. It's like a recording of the problem as it happened. At idle a typical MAP sensor Voltage reading should be about a volt, and at WOT (wide open throttle) it should approach 4.5 to 5 Volts. As for the TPS, at idle, the voltage reading is about 1 Volt or less. As the throttle is opened the reading will increase to 4.5 Volts at WOT. Do the two readings make sense? For example, if the TPS reading on Freeze Frame data shows 2.5 Volts (indicating partial throttle) does the MAP sensor indicate a reading that isn't at either extreme? Using the Freeze Frame data (if available) compare the MAP reading to the TPS when the problem occurred. This can help you identify what happened

If you have no access to Freeze Frame data then check if the MAP sensor voltage changes when you apply vacuum to it. You can do this by mouth or a vacuum pump. The voltage should increase as you apply vacuum. If the reading doesn't change as you apply vacuum, make sure there are no obstructions in the hose to the sensor. If the hose is clear, the MAP sensor is usually bad, but it doesn't rule out the following from causing the problem: Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at less than .5 Volts? Then:

NOTE: This code shouldn't set if the MAP is stuck at extremely low voltage, however, I'm adding it in because there's no way to know for certain for which vehicles a low voltage condition may set a P0105.

1. Inspect the wiring harness and MAP sensor connector. Repair any damage
2. Unplug the MAP sensor connector. Also, at the PCM connector, remove the MAP sensor signal wire and check for continuity to the MAP sensor connector. If there is infinite resistance, then repair open in MAP signal circuit. If the signal wire has continuity to the MAP sensor connector, then check for 5 volt reference voltage to the connector and a good ground. If both are present, then re-install all removed wiring and replace the MAP sensor.

Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at full 4.5 voltage? Then:
1. Inspect the wiring harness for damage. Repair as needed
2. Remove the MAP sensor signal wire from the PCM connector. With a voltmeter measure the voltage with KEY ON ENGINE OFF. Is there 4.5 Volts? If so, unplug the MAP sensor and recheck. If it is still present, then repair short between the signal wire and 5 volt reference wire.
3. If unplugging the MAP sensor causes the voltage to disappear, check that the ground is intact. If it is, then replace the MAP sensor due to internal short.

MAP sensor codes include P0106, P0107, P0108 and P0109 .


LOCATIONS:
Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) Sensor: The MAP sensor is located against the firewall to the left side of the engine.
Barometric Pressure Sensor: This sensor is installed on the VAF sensor; Volume Air Flow Sensor Is located in the air intake plenum assembly.

Hope this helps.

Jan 24, 2011 | 2001 Hyundai Elantra

1 Answer

How do you replace the throttle position sensor


Removal & Installation
  1. Remove the idle air control (IAC) electrical connector (1) from the IAC sensor (4).
  2. Remove the manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor electrical connector from the MAP sensor.
  3. Remove the water pump belt cover.
  4. Remove the TP sensor retaining screws electrical connector (2) from the TP sensor (3).
  5. Remove the TP sensor electrical connector (2) from the TP sensor (3).


57f7d68.gif

Detaching electrical connectors prior to TP sensor removal



6244f87.gif

Identifying components for removal of the TP Sensor


To install:
  1. Install the new O-ring on to the TP sensor.
  2. Connect the TP Sensor electrical connector (2) to the TP sensor (3).
  3. Install the TP sensor (2) on to the throttle body (1). Tighten the TP sensor screws to 2.3 Nm (20 inch lbs.).
  4. Connect the IAC electrical connector (1) to the IAC sensor (4).
  5. Connect the MAP sensor electrical connector to the MAP sensor.
  6. Install the water pump belt and tensioner cover.
  7. Perform the TP Sensor learn procedure:
  8. Turn the ignition to the RUN/ON position.
  9. Wait 1 minute.
  10. Turn the ignition to the LOCK/OFF position.

May 12, 2010 | 2000 GMC Jimmy

1 Answer

MAP sensor / does a 2006 f150 have one? and if it


Bad MAP sensor....located on your intake manifold....one connector...1 o-ring

Mar 04, 2009 | 2006 Ford F-150

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