Question about 1986 Jaguar Xj S

1 Answer

What type of engine oil should I use in a 1986 xj12 h.e. engine and should it be mineral or synthetic oil.

Posted by Anonymous on

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that gotĀ 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 20 times.

    Scholar:

    An expert who has written 20 answers of more than 400 characters.

  • Expert
  • 87 Answers

I would recommend a good 10W40 standard oil. The V-12 uses almost a case of oil ( 11 qts ) per change and synthetic would be really pricey. Also the Jag engines of that period had a tendency to leak oil, so much so that Jaguar put out a notice to call it "controlled seepage", so the rumour goes. Synthetic oil will leak at a greater rate than a nonsynthetic in an engine with leakage problems.

Posted on Dec 29, 2010

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

Best engine oil for ford territory 07 sy please just need top up


Oil weight is written on the fill cap on the engine, any name brand oil will do just fine.

Jun 29, 2017 | Ford Cars & Trucks

Tip

Which Oil Should I Use?


A common question is 'Which oil should I use?'

There's three categories of engine oil:
  1. Fully synthetic
  2. Semi synthetic
  3. Mineral
As a general rule of thumb, fully synthetic is the best - and the most expensive.
Semi synthetic is a blend of synthetic and mineral oil, and mineral oil is lifted out a hole in the ground in a bucket.

Oil is also given a rating of 0-30W and 5-40W. There's others, of course. This rating just refers to the viscosity - the thickness of the oil under certain conditions. 0-30W is a thinner oil than 5-40W.

At one time people used to use a thicker oil in their car engine during the winter months and a thinner oil during the summer months.

Fully synthetic 0-30W oil is often specified for engines that have 'zero tolerance'. Here, zero tolerance simply means no space between the metal of the piston and the cylinder wall. The oil must be thin enough to be able to coat the mating metal surfaces and yet be robust enough to withstand the pressures of what is basically pressurised metal to metal contact.

Using semi synthetic oil in a zero-tolerance engine will cause very rapid wear indeed. Topping up a zero-tolerance engine with mineral oil can have catastrophic results. Not only does it not afford protection but it - the mineral oil - will form a 'globule' - a ball - inside the oil sump/pan that will block the oil pump pick-up with absolute catastrophic results - very quickly.

In Europe the Saab 9-5 model had, amongst others, a V8 3000c diesel engine fitted. It was a zero-tolerance engine. Many of these cars ended up with wrecked engines simply because owners had topped up with the wrong oil. And, on a zero-tolerance engine the oil level itself is critical so much so that Saab modified the oil dipstick so that owners overfilled with oil by 1 litre. A zero-tolerance engine doesn't tolerate a 'slightly lower' oil level.

Most drivers wouldn't know if their car was a zero-tolerance engine. If you use fully synthetic 0-30W (or follow the manufacturer's recommendation) you won't go far wrong. You can use fully synthetic 0-30W in your 1956 Cadillac if you wish. It won't harm it.

Other grades of fully synthetic are fully suitable for all non-zero tolerance engines.

The difference between fully synthetic (apart from the price) and semi synthetic and mineral is that of durability. Fully synthetic 'breaks down' slower .. in other words, it lasts longer as a 'lubricant' ... does its job better.

Short journeys destroy engine oil - particularly mineral oil. Toxins and carbons accumulate in the oil and cause it to break down into 'sludge'. Semi synthetic oil is more resistant to breaking down, and fully synthetic is even better.

If you've got a decent car with a decent engine - use fully synthetic 0-30W. If it isn't a 'zero-tolerance' engine use any fully synthetic oil or semi synthetic oil.

If you have an old 1998 4 litre Jeep that burns oil like I have, a cheap mineral oil will do. But do change the oil and filter regularly. Regular oil/filter changes promotes the life of your engine - irrespective of what car you drive - and it really does prevent mechanical problems such as noisy camshafts/engine knocks.

on Nov 06, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Im thinking of switching to synthetic or blend engine oil but do I use same weight as in 10w 40 etc. in the synthetic or blend type oils?


Yes, use the same viscosity. Do not mix Fully Synthetic with Mineral. You can use Semi Synthetic and then top up with any type with the same viscosity.

May 27, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

What type and grade of oil do i use in my 2003 oldsmobile alero 2.2ll4 ecotec


try 5w30 it will work ok! The brand is your choice. God-Bless!

Nov 02, 2015 | Oldsmobile Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Why do 2015 Toyota 4 runners have to use sinthetic oil opposed to the 2013 models


synthetic oils maintain a fairly constant viscosity through out the operation heat range , where as mineral oils change viscosity as the engine gets hotter ( synthetic oils 20 w and minerals 15w-40 )
It could be a manufacturer requirement to maintain warranty but it is generally accepted that mineral oils and synthetic oils have small differences in the life of an engine
Talk with an oil manufacturer such as castrol, shell etc and with your service dealer to get a better understanding of the requirement

Aug 28, 2015 | Toyota Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Wrong oil?


Have the oil changed as it is wrong viscosity oil. It should be 20w -40 or 15w 30. Mixing synthetic and mineral oils is not a good idea as the bases are different and may cause engine problems. Most service departments use mineral oil as synthetic oil is too dear for a normal service and the customer would complain about the price.. Synthetic oil has no real advantage over mineral oil unless you are rallying or racing but in normal driving it is an expensive waste as you have to change the oil at least every 10.000klms to remove the wasted additives the hold water ,carbon, and other combustion by products in suspension to be removed when the oil is drained out.

Nov 20, 2013 | Mazda Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Engine oil capacity & type


Hello,

Visco 2000 or mobil oil, use the dipstick to check do not let it be too full.

The type specified by the vehicle manufacturer in your owner's manual. For most passenger car and light truck gasoline engines today, it's any oil that meets the American Petroleum Institutes "SH" rating.
As for the viscosity of oil to use, most new engines today require a multiviscosity 5W-30 oil for all-round driving. The lighter 5W-30 oils contain friction reducing additives that help improve fuel economy, and also allow the oil to quickly reach critical upper valvetrain components when a cold engine is first started. Most engine wear occurs immediately after a cold start, so it's important to have oil that is thin enough to circulate easily -- especially at cold temperatures.
For older engines and ones that are driven at sustained highways speeds during hot weather, 10W-30 or 10W-40 is a good choice. Heavier multiviscosity oils such as 20W-40 are for high rpm, high-load applications primarily and are not recommended for cold weather driving.
Straight weight 30W and 40W oils aren't very popular anymore, but some diehards insist on using them. They say the thicker oil holds up better under high temperature (which it does), increases oil pressure and reduces oil consumption in high mileage engines. But straight 30W and 40W oils are too thick for cold weather and may make an engine hard to start. They may also be too thick to provide adequate start-up lubrication to critical upper valvetrain components during cold weather. So switching to a straight 20W oil would be necessary for cold weather driving. Straight 10W oil can also improve cold starting, but is very thin and should only be used in sub-zero climates. A multiviscosity 10W-30 or 10W-40 will provide the same cold starting benefits of a 10W oil and the high temperature protection of a 30W or 40W oil.
For the ultimate in high temperature protection, durability and all-round performance, synthetic oils are the way to go. Unfortunately, most synthetic oils cost up to three times as much as ordinary petroleum-based oils. They cost more because synthetics are manmade rather than refined from petroleum. But this improves their performance in virtually every aspect:
  • Superior temperature resistance. Synthetics can safely handle higher operating temperatures without oxidizing (burning) or breaking down. The upper limit for most mineral based oils is about 250 to 300 degrees F. Synthetics can take up to 450 degrees F. or higher. This makes synthetics well-suited for turbo applications as well as high rpm and high output engine applications.
  • Better low temperature performance. Synthetics flow freely at subzero temperatures, pouring easily at -40 or -50 degrees F. where ordinary oils turn to molasses. This makes for easier cold starts and provides faster upper valvetrain lubrication during the first critical moments when most engine wear occurs.
  • Better engine performance. Synthetics tend to be more slippery than their petroleum-based counterparts, which improves fuel economy, cuts frictional horsepower losses and helps the engine run cooler. The difference isn't great, but it can make a noticeable difference.
  • Longer oil change intervals. Because synthetics resist oxidation and viscosity breakdown better than ordinary motor oils, some suppliers say oil change intervals can be safely extended -- in some cases stretched to as much as 25,000 miles. Such claims are justified by the fact that synthetics don't break down or sludge up as fast as ordinary mineral-based oils do in use. CAUTION: For vehicles under warranty, extending the normal change interval is not recommended because failing to follow the OEM's maintenance schedule can void your warranty.
    Synthetics are available in the same grades as ordinary motor oils (5W-30, 5W-20 and 10W-30) as well as "extended" grades such as 15W-50 and even 5W-50.
    There are also lower-cost synthetic "blends" that combine synthetic and petroleum-based oils in the same container. But you can do your own blend to save money by simply substituting a quart or two of synthetic oil for conventional oil when you change oil. Synthetics are compatible with conventional motor oils.
    Who should use a synthetic oil? The premium-priced oil is best for:
    • Turbocharged or supercharged engines
    • Performance or high output engines
    • Vehicles used for towing (especially during hot weather)
    • Vehicles that are operated in extremely cold or hot climates
    • Anyone who wants the ultimate in lubrication and protection

Take care and good luck

Dec 03, 2010 | 2008 Nissan Xterra

2 Answers

OIl, synthetic or regular, what's the difference?


Synthetic oil won't break down as quickly as conventional oil, gives better protection and longer life. Excellent product, I Strongly suggested for those out there who forget to do their oil changes regularly or courier/ work vehicles.
Heres the link to an explaination from Castrol
http://www.castrol.com/castrol/genericarticle.do?categoryId=8264018&contentId=6003233
I use conventional Oil in my jimmy with 5% of Lucas engine oil treatment and service the engine every 3,000 miles. I find it to costly for the Synthetic oil every 3,000 miles, and as for the high mileage oil you can buy. The high mileage oil has a higher fluid retention like adding Lucas engine oil treatment to any conventional oil, so you decide on what type of oil you like to use in your engine.
Good luck and hope this helps.

Mar 07, 2010 | 2004 Toyota Tundra

1 Answer

Which oil should i buy for VW eos


oli depends on several issues.
the two types are mineral or synthetic oils but this does not
matter although a lot of people prefer synthetic oils

if you live somwhere hot then a thicker oil is better as it will
keep is viscosity in hot weather
and in cold countries or in winter then a thinner oil is needed
so it moves round the engine when it is cold.

in Germany VW recommend Oils from Castrol.
it is best to ask a dealership for which oil rating is best for where you are.

Oct 12, 2009 | 2007 Volkswagen EOS Convertible

1 Answer

I have got a w reg peugot 106 1.1 and have topped it up with 5w-30 oil is this ok as someone is telling me this is the wrong oil to use.


No harm provided this is the grade you added to. Not a lot of harm if previous oil was syntectic or semi synthetic but if the oil in the engine was mineral oil then they won't mix properly. If you are unsure then it's best to change it all. Another thought I have is if it needed topping up then it's probably ready for an oil change anyway. If you have changed it recently check it was changed with the recomended grade. If you put synthetic oil in an engine where mineral or semi syntectic is recomended then fully synthetic your engine may burn it as it is very thin. Hope all this makes sence to you if not get back to me and I will clarify. Cheer's

Sep 12, 2009 | 2005 Peugeot 405

Not finding what you are looking for?
Cars & Trucks Logo

Related Topics:

242 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Jaguar Experts

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22095 Answers

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

75005 Answers

SPEEDY CAR WORK SHOP...

Level 2 Expert

489 Answers

Are you a Jaguar Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...