Question about 2000 BMW 3 Series

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High diesel consumption

320 d high diesel consumption. Boost then engine doesnt pick up revs

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  • kagr Jan 05, 2009

    I have a 2007 BMW 320d but have trouble getting more than 40 mpg , I had the older model before it and got between 45 and 50 mpg .Whats going on , BMW says the newer car is more economical.

  • kagr Jan 05, 2009

    My 2007 BMW 320d is averaging 39 mpg when my 2003 320d averaged 45 mpg . Whats the problem with the newer car?

  • Anonymous Mar 16, 2014

    new car and high consumption of engine oil

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  • 375 Answers

U may face with a gear pro. transition from a low gear to high gear cause a high consume in your machine.

Posted on Jul 06, 2008

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Model is 2ltd turbo diesel Whistling noise from engine compartment, which gets higher tone with revs. worst when cold.


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Good afternnon, I have a landrover 110 diesel 1987 the engine wont rev initially but if you hold down the accellerator it will slowly pick up.After engine has reached high revs when you remove your foot...


Its possible the fuel lift pump is faulty. remove the fuel filter, if you see that its half full of fuel, then this will tell you the pump is at fault.
There is a lever on the fuel lift pump, turn the ngine till you feel itgo harder, then feel the travel of the pump and if it is firm or easy to operate.
Lift pump failure is common on these.

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Engine revs go high when changing gears but loss of power on MAGN


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http://www.cobbtuning.com/info/?ID=3481

Jul 07, 2009 | 2004 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution

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Tdi components in a 2.0 xflow


You are probably better off using aftermarket gear meant for the car. Remember that a diesel uses extremely high compression ratios (as high as 17:1), and that is created partially by the head's deck height and combustion chamber dome, and partially by the rod length. Very high compression ratios are not desirable for a turbo engine unless it's extremely fine-tuned (by a pro on a dyno, using standalone mapping to set up all the individual timing and fuel maps for partial throttle vs full throttle activation, boost-dependent timing ******, etc). Trying to piece together a high compression turbo setup and controlling its operation with an off-the-shelf turbo chip is a recipe for mulching the internals of your engine. As far as valve springs and retainers, it'll depend on the size of the valves relative to the size of your engine's valves, and the cam would definitely be wrong to use - diesels are designed for large amounts of low-end torque and a low rev limit, whereas a gas turbo engine depends on higher RPM for spool and power production. The lobes of a diesel cam are optimized for low-end operation and won't run well at higher revs (since they were designed for an engine that will never see those higher revs - the diesel will hit redline shortly after the RPM point at which the gas engine really starts to build boost). You may even find that the OEM cams are fine for use on a turbo setup - usually it isn't until you really start pushing that you NEED cams. Even the stage 3 kit from C2 that I've seen uses OEM cams, and that's set up for a base tune close to 500hp on the VR6 (not your engine, but still, making 500hp on an engine that was designed at 170ish hp, and still using stock cams, shows the potential for high-end breathing of OEM gear). I'd do the turbo setup and get it working great, and then start upping the boost and upgrading further components, like the cams, as needed.

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