Question about 2002 Volkswagen Beetle Turbo S

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Surging Turbo Once my turbo engauges it begins to surge up & down causing the increase in speed to drop off then begin to rise, drop off..

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I had the same problem and it was a leaking vacuum valve from the turbo as well. The part cost about 30.00 and you can fix it yourself. It is on the front of the motor. Take the cover off and take off the vacumme hose. Replace the sensor by taking off the clamp on the hose and simply replace it and push the hose back on. It helped me and the light is gone for now.

Posted on Jul 21, 2008

I had the same trouble, my problem was a leaking turbo valve and it was expensive to replace at the dealer$

Posted on Jul 10, 2008

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Why does my car have a surging when going down the road at any speed? Electrical?


it is possible that it will be the cause of the problem. Clean the terminal and the connected wires by placing them in a container of hot solution of carbonated soda ( baking powder). This will neutralize the sulphuric acid corrosion. Was with clean water when reaction has stopped. Cover terminals with vaseliene ( CRC terminal spray wax is best) make sure all connections are tight.
Also have the fault codes read to check for ather sensor problems.

Jan 16, 2015 | 1995 Buick LeSabre

1 Answer

Car surging


Is the car equipped with the Automatic Transmission?
If so, read on.
Otherwise skip to the end and answer some questions.

POSSIBLE SCENARIO:
I have observed a condition where my car surges slightly when the torque-converter clutch (TCC) cycles between lock and unlock when driving on an uphill grade.
First some basics and history that will explain why the TCC is used.

Engine, Torque Converter, TCC, and Transmission relationship--
The TCC allows for a solid connection between the engine and transmission which allows the input to the transmission to rotate at the same speed as the engine.
Without a TCC, there is slippage between the engine and automatic transmission. The slippage is greatest at low engine RPM. That is what allows the engine to run with the automatic transmission in gear, like when you first shift into gear or stop at a stop sign. When the throttle pedal is depressed, the engine RPM begins to increase and the torque converter begins to slip less and less the more the engine RPM increases. The car moves. But even at cruising speeds the torque converter slips slightly. Engine RPM is greater than transmission input RPM, which is realized as slight decrease in fuel efficiency.
When acceleration is complete and a constant speed is being maintained, the engine power output is reduced to the point where the TCC can engage and eliminate any slippage between the engine and transmission. If the car has a tachometer the engagement of the TCC can be verified when a slight reduction in engine RPM observed without a corresponding change in vehicle speed.
One method used to test the operation of the TCC is as follows:
Find a flat section of road where it is safe to perform the test.
Reach a steady speed and keep the gas pedal depressed with one foot. While observing the tachometer (or listening for an increase in engine RPM), with the other foot depress the brake pedal enough to activate the break light switch but not enough to engage the brakes. When the brake light switch activates, the TCC receives a signal to disengage. With the gas pedal being held steady, release the brake pedal and the engine RPM should decrease when the TCC engages.
Old cars with Automatic Transmissions did not use a TCC. I believe the TCC was put in use in an attempt to increase fuel economy.

MY EXPERIENCE WITH SIMILAR SYMPTOMS
The condition that causes that issue on my car is this:
- A slight uphill grade increases the load on the engine.
The car tends to gradually slow and it is necessary to depress the gas pedal to maintain speed.
- Depressing the throttle pedal (manually, or automatically with cruise control engaged) signals the torque converter clutch to unlock when the load increases slightly. (A more drastic load increase would signal the Transmission to downshift to a lower gear.) The corresponding increase in engine RPM and output is enough to compensate for the reduction in speed. When the vehicle speed, engine RPM, and throttle position stabilize to the point that the TCC will engage and the engine RPM will reduce in correspondence with TCC engagement. Now, if the road conditions have not changed, power output is not enough to maintain vehicle speed. With the increased load caused by full engagement between engine and transmission, and the cycle (surging) repeats itself until the road conditions change.

Does that help?
If not:

QUESTIONS
Please define the symptoms.
What are the road conditions when the surge occurs? (A slight uphill grade?)
What is the frequency of the surge?
Does the engine power output have a noticeable surge?
Is there a speed change related to the surge?
Does the tachometer move up and down with little or no change in vehicle speed?
Are all instrument indication in the normal range?
What else has changed?

Good luck!

May 24, 2014 | Subaru Impreza WRX STi Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2002 Nissa Sentra 1.8l Starts fine but when


How many miles on it? I had to replace my engine at 220,000. When is the last time you had a tune up? Could be a couple of things. You might get more ideas on a Nissan forum.

Oct 18, 2013 | Nissan Sentra Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Saab 95 turbo surging 2.3


do you know if this is an electronically controlled turbo or air controlled?

Jul 18, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

The Turbo Charger does not seem to engage .I was led to believe that after around 30 miles per hr. it would be like haveing a passing gear. Oh yes the car is a 1984 Nercedes SD 300 series Desiel.


The turbo charger has more to do with rpms than road speed.The turbo uses exhaust gas leaving the engine to push more fresh air into the engine thus creating higher compression and more horse power.You should feel some boost above 1500 rpms if everything is working properly.If not then you should have the system checked by a dealer or a good diesel shop.Good Luck!

Apr 02, 2011 | 1984 Mercedes-Benz Mercedes Benz 300 Class

1 Answer

What causes turbochargers to leak oil


There are seals and bearing inside the turbo. Since the turbo operates at high speeds and are exposed to heat, those parts tend to wear out and begin to leak oil.

Oct 18, 2010 | 1984 Toyota Corolla

2 Answers

L994 cheverolet silverado 4by4 automatic trans--intermitant transmission problem --won't shift up to next gears out of low--also the speedometer goes dead and the break warning light comes on--after some...


Check the multi-pin connector that goes to the side of the transmission. Make sure that it isn't dirty, bent or corroded. If it is, that's what could be causing the problem. (Mine got bent by 4x4ing and it wouldn't shift properly after that. Once I replaced it with a harness from the auto wrecker, worked like a charm.)

Sep 20, 2009 | 1994 Chevrolet C1500

4 Answers

83 mustang gt


In a 83 MUSTANG GT the correct answer is BOTH. As a 5.0L and a TURBO CHARGED 4 cyinder were offered.


1983 Mustang GT
  • Engine:
    • 5.0L horsepower increased to 175 HP when 4V carb replaced 2V carb from 1982 (Holley 4180C series).
    • Exhaust system was revised (less restrictive).
    • 4-speed SROD was only transmission available until early December 1982. In December, new 5-speed T5 became standard GT transmission (4-speed remained on option list).
    • Block and crank were revised to accomodate a 1-piece rear main seal in December 1982.
    • The new "Turbo GT" with a turbo charged 4 cylinder engine was available beginning late in the model year - 145 HP and featured the same suspension and other features of the V8 Mustang GT.

Jun 02, 2009 | 1983 Ford Mustang Hatchback

6 Answers

Peugeot expert 20 hdi


Hi, I have a 2.0HDI Expert which was doing the exact same thing as yours, blowing thick black smoke, sluggish and loss of power on gradients, a hissing sound and surging. I replaced the air flow meter but that didn't help. I was told to replace the turbo but a turbo expoert told me not to as it would blow white smoke if it was faulty. I was then told to replace the injectors but a diagnostic test showed them to be functioning fine. I was then told to look at the intercooler which had thick sludge at the lower left pipe. I replaced it today - Sunday 12th July and it is now driving like a new van. It now pulls me up gradients with ease in 4th and 5th instead of having to drop gear to get to the top. I got a replacement from Euro Car Parts for £147 inc VAT. To tell if this is your problem, look through the gaps in the lower section of the bumper at what looks like the radiator and look for sludge over the inside of the bumper and all over the pipe where it joins the back of the radiator (intercooler). Also open the bonnet and look down behind the grille for the same sludge. Hope this sorts it for you. Barry, Newtownards, Northern Ireland.

Jul 11, 2008 | 2006 Peugeot 604

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