Question about 1989 Buick Reatta

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Buick Reatta Engine Electrical problem

I have replaced the fuel pressure regulator, IAC valve and Throttle position sensor. I still have a hesitatation problem when the accelerator pedal is pushed up to gain speed sending the throttle back to idle and cannot go past that or it dies. Any help would be greatly appreciated. It does have good fuel pressure at 40 psi and all injectors are working. 1989

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  • Master
  • 3,113 Answers

If the ecm has the number 1228253 on it that is your problem. These gave a lot of trouble, get a delco 16198264 or newer number to replace the junk 1228253.

Posted on Apr 07, 2010

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Check Engine Light


The usual suspects: O2 sensor, IAC Valve, Throttle position sensor, throttle position switch, fuel damper, or fuel regulator. Last but not least computer.. Please post when you find the solution, I need help with that one also. About to send my computer off for repair, because I have qualified all of the other suspects to be good. to include speed sensor, and flywheel position sensor. O2 Sensor? mounted on the exhaust downstream.

Nov 17, 2013 | 2005 Suzuki Forenza Wagon

2 Answers

Stalls while in drive with foot on brake , changed MAP Sensor, Crank Shaft Sensor , Distributor, Fuel Pump, Fuel Filter , have ran out of ideas


I would check the IAC motor or idle air control motor, heres a little info.about the part.Stratus Sedan, 1999-2005 Idle Air Control Motor

Print


Description & Operation

Not for Dodge Stratus Sedan
The idle air control motor (IAC) attaches to the throttle body. It is an electric stepper motor. The PCM adjusts engine idle speed through the idle air control motor to compensate for engine load, coolant temperature or barometric pressure changes. The throttle body has an air bypass passage that provides air for the engine during closed throttle idle. The idle air control motor pintle protrudes into the air bypass passage and regulates airflow through it.
The PCM adjusts engine idle speed by moving the IAC motor pintle in and out of the bypass passage. The adjustments are based on inputs the PCM receives. The inputs are from the throttle position sensor, crankshaft position sensor, coolant temperature sensor, MAP sensor, vehicle speed sensor and various switch operations (brake, park/neutral, air conditioning).

0996b43f8020234f.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

Fig.

Not for Dodge Stratus Sedan
When engine rpm is above idle speed, the IAC is used for the following functions:


Off-idle dashpot Deceleration air flow control A/C compressor load control (also opens the passage slightly before the compressor is engaged so that the engine rpm does not dip down when the compressor engages)
The idle air control motor (IAC) attaches to the throttle body. It is an electric stepper motor. The PCM adjusts engine idle speed through the idle air control motor to compensate for engine load, coolant temperature or barometric pressure changes. The throttle body has an air bypass passage that provides air for the engine during closed throttle idle. The idle air control motor pintle protrudes into the air bypass passage and regulates airflow through it.
The PCM adjusts engine idle speed by moving the IAC motor pintle in and out of the bypass passage. The adjustments are based on inputs the PCM receives. The inputs are from the throttle position sensor, crankshaft position sensor, coolant temperature sensor, MAP sensor, vehicle speed sensor and various switch operations (brake, park/neutral, air conditioning).

21180_cdia_g257.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

Fig.

When engine rpm is above idle speed, the IAC is used for the following functions:


Off-idle dashpot Deceleration air flow control A/C compressor load control (also opens the passage slightly before the compressor is engaged so that the engine rpm does not dip down when the compressor engages)
Target Idle
Target idle is determined by the following inputs:


Gear position ECT Sensor Battery voltage Ambient/Battery Temperature Sensor VSS TPS MAP Sensor
Target idle is determined by the following inputs:


Gear position ECT Sensor Battery voltage Ambient/Battery Temperature Sensor VSS TPS MAP Sensor


Removal & Installation

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Disconnect the IAC electrical connector.
  3. Remove the IAC mounting screws.
  4. Remove the IAC.

To Install:
  1. Install the IAC to the throttle body.
  2. Tighten mounting screws to 5.1 Nm (45 inch lbs.) torque.
  3. Attach electrical connector to the IAC.
  4. Connect the negative battery cable.

    0996b43f80202350.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

    Fig.


  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Disconnect the IAC electrical connector.
  3. Remove the IAC mounting screws.
  4. Remove the IAC.

To Install:
  1. Install the IAC to the throttle body.
  2. Tighten mounting screws to 5.1 Nm (45 inch lbs.) torque.
  3. Attach electrical connector to the IAC.
  4. Connect the negative battery cable.

May 11, 2012 | 2000 Chrysler Cirrus

1 Answer

I have a 2001 mazda 626 and when im driving it skips sometimes


Description
Engine stops unexpectedly at beginning of acceleration or during acceleration
Engine stops unexpectedly while cruising
Engine speed fluctuates during acceleration or while cruising
Engine misses during acceleration or cruising
Vehicle bucks or jerks during acceleration, while cruising, or upon deceleration
Momentary pause at the beginning of acceleration or during acceleration
Momentary minor irregularity in engine output


Possible Causes
Air leakage from intake-air system parts
Improper operation of idle air control valve
Crankshaft sensor circuit malfunction
Camshaft sensor circuit malfunction
Spark leakage from ignition coil
PCV valve malfunction
Restriction in exhaust system
Open or short circuit in fuel pump and related harness
Improper fuel pressure
Fuel leakage from injector
Improper A/C system operation
Purge solenoid valve malfunction
EGR valve malfunction
EGR solenoid malfunction
Low engine compression
Vacuum leakage
Fuel pump control relay and resistor
Poor fuel quality
Air filter restriction
Electrical connector disconnection
No battery power supply to ECU or poor ground
Fuel pump mechanical malfunction
Clogged injector


Diagnostic Procedure

1. Verify vacuum hose connections, check the air filter, check for leakage or restriction of the intake-air system, ensure proper sealing of intake manifold and components attached (e.g. EGR, IAC), examine ignition components, fuel quality, and electrical connections. Are all items okay?

Yes - Go to next step
No - Service as required.
2. Check for stored OBD-II error codes. Are there any stored codes?

Yes - Go to appropriate DTC test
No - Go to next step
3. Is engine overheating?

Yes - Go to Symptom #10 for "engine overheats"
No - Go to next step
4. Connect an OBD-II scan tool capable of logging sensor output and drive the vehicle. Are engine speed (RPM), mass-airflow (MAF), throttle position (TP), and vehicle speed (VSS) PIDs within specifications?

Yes - Go to next step
No - Inspect crankshaft position sensor (RPM) circuit, mass airflow sensor (MAF) circuit, throttle position sensor (TP) circuit, and vehicle speed sensor (VSS) circuit.
5. Visually inspect the crankshaft position sensor and the teeth on the crankshaft pulley. Are these components okay?

Yes - Go to next step
No - Service as required
6. Measure the gap between the crankshaft position sensor and the teeth of the crankshaft pulley (specification: 0.5-1.5mm). Is the gap within specification?

Yes - Go to next step
No - Adjust crankshaft position sensor
7. Check spark plug condition. Are spark plugs wet, grayish white, or covered with carbon soot?

Yes - If wet or sooty, check for leaky fuel injector
No - Install spark plugs on original cylinders then go to next step
8. Remove PCV valve and shake PCV valve. Does the valve rattle?

Yes - Go to next step
No - Replace PCV valve
9. Verify that the throttle lever is resting on the throttle valve stop screw and/or throttle valve orifice plug. Are there any faults present?

Yes - adjust as necessary
No - Go to next step
10. Is there an exhaust restriction?

Yes - Inspect exhaust system
No - Go to next step
11. Check fuel pressure between fuel filter and fuel rail. Connect a jumper wire between the F/P terminal at the engine bay DLC connector and ground. Is the fuel line pressure within specification (280-330kPa or 41-48psi) with the ignition switch on?

Yes - Go to next step
No - If there is no or low pressure, check the fuel pump circuit, control relay and resistor, fuel pump relief valve as well as for fuel leakage inside the fuel pressure regulator and for a restricted main fuel line. If the fuel pressure is too high, check the fuel pressure regulator, the fuel pump control relay and resistor, and for a clogged fuel return line
12. Does fuel pressure increase when the accelerator is depressed?

Yes - Go to next step
No - Examine the fuel pressure regulator control (PRC) solenoid
13. Skip to the next step if the symptom occurs with or without the A/C running. If symptom occurs only with A/C operation, connect a pressure gauge to the A/C line and measure both low and high side pressures. Are the pressures within specifications?

Yes - Go to next step
No - Check the refrigerant charging amount, A/C pressure switch operation, condenser fan operation, and the A/C relay
14. Skip to the next step if the symptom occurs with or without cruise control operation. If symptom occurs only during cruise control operation, inspect the cruise control system. Is cruise control system operating properly?

Yes - Go to next step
No - Repair cruise control system
15. Is the evaporative emissions purge control system okay?

Yes - Go to next step
No - Check if purge control solenoid sticks open mechanically. Inspect the evaporative emissions control system.
16. Visually inspect the camshaft pulley, is the camshaft pulley okay?

Yes - Go to next step
No - Replace camshaft pulley
17. With the engine idling, disconnect the vacuum hose from the EGR valve and plug it. Is the engine condition improved?

Yes - Check for a stuck EGR solenoid vacuum valve, vent valve, and solenoid valve connector terminals
No - Check if the EGR valve moves smoothly. If yes, go to next step. If no, replace the EGR valve
18. Is the air-bypass valve actuator okay?

Yes - Go to next step
No - Replace air-bypass valve actuator
19. Check engine compression with a cylinder compression test tool. Is the engine compression within specifications?

Yes - Verify valve timing and transmission operation
No - Check for cause
20. Verify test results

Apr 25, 2012 | 2001 Mazda 626

1 Answer

My ford taurus SE 1999 have 3 codes P1504, P1507 and P1131


DTC Description Possible Causes Diagnostic Aides P1504 - Idle Air Control (IAC) Circuit Malfunction This DTC is set when the PCM detects an electrical load failure on the IAC output circuit.
  • IAC circuit open
  • VPWR to IAC solenoid open
  • IAC circuit short to PWR
  • IAC circuit short to GND
  • Damaged IAC valve
  • Damaged PCM
  • The IAC solenoid resistance is from 6 to 13 ohms.
    • IAC valve stuck open
    • Vacuum leaks
    • Failed EVAP system
    • Damaged PCM
  • The IAC solenoid resistance is from 6 to 13 ohms.
P1507 - Idle Air Control (IAC) Underspeed Error This DTC is set when the PCM detects engine idle speed that is less than the desired rpm.
  • IAC circuit open
  • IAC circuit short to PWR
  • VPWR to IAC solenoid open
  • Air inlet is plugged
  • Damaged IAC solenoid
  • Damaged PCM
  • The IAC solenoid resistance is from 6 to 13 ohms
  • Disconnect IAC valve and look for no change in engine rpm as an indication of a stuck or damaged valve
P1131 - Lack of HO2S-11 Switch, Sensor Indicates Lean A HEGO sensor indicating lean at the end of a test is trying to correct for an over-rich condition. The test fails when the fuel control system no longer detects switching for a calibrated amount of time.
  • Electrical:
    • Short to VPWR in harness or HO2S
    • Water in harness connector
    • Open/Shorted HO2S circuit
    • Corrosion or poor mating terminals and wiring
    • Damaged HO2S
    • Damaged PCM
  • Fuel System:
    • Excessive fuel pressure
    • Leaking/contaminated fuel injectors
    • Leaking fuel pressure regulator
    • Low fuel pressure or running out of fuel
    • Vapor recovery system
  • Induction System:
    • Air leaks after the MAF
    • Vacuum Leaks
    • PCV system
    • Improperly seated engine oil dipstick
  • EGR System:
    • Leaking gasket
    • Stuck EGR valve
    • Leaking diaphragm or EVR
  • Base Engine:
    • Oil overfill
    • Cam timing
    • Cylinder compression
    • Exhaust leaks before or near the HO2S(s)
A fuel control HO2S PID switching across 0.45 volt from 0.2 to 0.9 volt indicates a normal switching HO2S.

Mar 16, 2011 | 1999 Ford Taurus

2 Answers

How do you replace the intake manifold gasket on a 2001 ford E-250 5.4L??????????????? thanks


We cannot find pics about this, but I hope that this description helpfull.

5.4L Engine
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the Precautions Section.
  2. Disconnect the battery ground cable.
  3. Remove the interior engine cover.
  4. Disconnect the fuel hose spring lock couplings.
  5. Drain the cooling system.
  6. Position the engine air cleaner (ACL).
  7. Disconnect the MAF sensor electrical connector and remove the ACL.
  8. Disconnect the two hoses.
  9. Loosen the clamp and remove the air cleaner outlet pipe.
  10. Remove the accelerator cable snow shield.
  11. Disconnect the accelerator cable.
  12. Disconnect the speed control actuator cable.
  13. Remove the throttle return spring.
  14. Compress and slide the hose clamp and disconnect the upper radiator hose.
  15. Disconnect the coolant hose.
  16. Disconnect the coolant hose.
  17. Disconnect the throttle position (TP) sensor.
  18. Disconnect the differential pressure feedback exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system.
  19. Remove the differential pressure feedback EGR system bracket.
  20. Remove the bolt and the bracket.
  21. Remove the bolts and the alternator upper support bracket.
  22. Remove the bolt retaining the transmission fluid filler tube support bracket.
  23. Remove the bolts and position the accelerator cable bracket and cables aside.
  24. If equipped, disconnect the auxiliary heater hoses and position aside.
  25. Disconnect and remove the idle air control (IAC) valve fresh air hose.
  26. Disconnect the evaporative emission canister purge valve hose and vacuum hose.
  27. Remove the two evaporative emission canister purge valve nuts and position the valve aside.
  28. Disconnect the fuel pressure sensor vacuum hose and the electrical connector.
  29. Disconnect the EGR vacuum regulator solenoid connections.
  30. Disconnect the EGR valve vacuum hose.
  31. Disconnect the IAC valve electrical connector.
  32. Disconnect the brake booster and main engine vacuum harness and position aside.
  33. Disconnect the differential pressure feedback EGR sensor hoses from the EGR valve.
  34. Remove the exhaust manifold-to-EGR valve tube.
  35. Remove the four bolts, and the throttle body and adapter as an assembly. Discard the throttle body adapter gasket.
  36. Disconnect and remove the positive crankcase ventilation hose.
  37. Disconnect the eight ignition coil electrical connectors.
  38. Disconnect the eight fuel injector electrical connectors.
  39. Remove the eight bolts and the eight ignition coils.
  40. Remove the bolts, the thermostat housing and the thermostat. Disconnect the O-ring seal.
  41. Remove the nine bolts retaining the intake manifold.
  42. Remove the intake manifold. Discard the intake manifold gaskets.
  43. Inspect the throttle body, the intake manifold, and their sealing surfaces for damage.
continue...

Jan 19, 2011 | 2002 Ford E250

1 Answer

2000 chevy tahoe z71 5.7 v-8 vortec intermittently wont start unless I spray starting fluid in the throttle body ! fuel pressure checks good on the fuel rail and I already replaced fuel pressure regulator...


I can think of four things. Do each in turn and test the engine after completing each one. If it gets fixed early in the list avoid the items later on. 1) check that your throttle interior is clean 'like new' along with the idle air control valve.
2) Idle Air Control Valve IACV - How to check? Physically remove the IACV but keep the electrical connection to it and loosely blank off the ports to the throttle inlet assembly, exposed by the IACV removal. Turn the engine on and examine the IACV valve movement in response to additional loads (power steering inputs etc). The valve should open and close according to demand causing perceptible change in engine speed with increased power demand being made on the engine.

The electrical connector to the IACV can have 2 or 4 pins:-

2 pins: resistance between pins should about 10 OHMS +/- 3 OHMS. Resistance between either of the pins and the valve body is greater than 10,000 OHMS

4 pins: resistance between diagonally positioned pins should be about 20 OHMS
How to fix? If the motor of the IACV has failed then replace it. If the valve is gummed closed by baked oil and carbon then clean it thoroughly with carburetor choke cleaner spray and a cloth. Similarly if the entry and exit ports on the throttle body to the IACV look blocked again clean them out thoroughly
3) Throttle Position Sensor TPS - How to check? The socket for electrical connection with the TPS has 3 pins, one for 'ground', one for 5 volts 'reference' and a third (generally the middle one) for 'signal' output. Back probe the signal pin in the connector to the TPS. Attach the positive lead of a voltmeter to the probe and measure the voltage output as the throttle plate is rotated. If working correctly the meter should show a voltage consistent with the throttle position from approximately 1 volt when closed and 5 volts when fully open. What is looked for is smooth voltage increase with throttle change. If there are drop outs in the transition or that there is no transition seen the TPS is faulty.

How to fix? If the track is dirty causing drop outs, try cleaning it with residue-free electrical cleaning spray. If the track is worn it is perhaps easiest to replace the complete device. In some instances it may be possible to adjust the location of the central mount of the TPS contact arm along the throttle shaft by a few millimeters and in the process cause a fresh concentric region of



4) Fuel pressure regulator _ Yes I know you have checked it for pressure but at start up when the ignition is at position 2 the fuel pump starts up and pressurizes the fuel rail. As you turn to position 3 "ignition" power is cut to the pump and fuel pressure is maintained by a non-return valve in the pump. If that valve is faulty the fuel pressure in the rail will drop to zero just when you need it and no fuel can be injected. Check the fuel pressure when at position 2 and then switched off; fuel pressure should be maintained for up to 5 minutes with little or no loss. If there is pressure loss then either the non-return valve is faulty or you have leak in the fuel pressure regulator. If it is such a leak, fuel will dribble from the vacuum line connected to it when disconnected.

Nov 25, 2010 | 2000 Chevrolet Tahoe

1 Answer

My service engine light is on. and I took it too autozone to be checked and got the results: Large vacuum leak on engine, 2. throttle body condition-dirty and faulty IAC valve/throttle. what does this...


These are all things that can affect your gas mileage and engine performance.

To check for vacuum leak, look for unhooked hoses on top of engine. If OK, use starter fluid and spray along intake manifold gaskets with engine running. If engine speeds up, there is a leaking gasket.

IAC deals with idle. Does the car idle smoothly? If not, remove IAC to see if it's dirty. I will paste instructions below for the IAC valve.

Throttle body dirty--what code is this? never heard of such a code, but you can clean the throttle body wioth carb cleaner. I will paste instructions below.

IAC valve info:


Operation The amount of air taken in during idling is regulated by the opening and closing of the servo valve located in the air passage that bypasses the throttle valve. The servo valve is opened or closed by the activation of the stepper motor (incorporated within the idle air control motor in the forward or reverse direction. Battery positive voltage is supplied, by way of the MFI relay, to the coil of the stepper motor. The engine control module switches ON the power transistors (located within the engine control module) in sequential order, and, when current flows to the stepper motor coil, the stepper motor is activated in the forward or reverse direction.


Removal & Installation

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Detach the electrical connector at the sensor.
  3. Remove the sensor from the throttle body.
To install:
  1. Install the sensor in the opening in the throttle body and tighten the sensor.
  2. Attach the electrical connector to the sensor.
  3. Connect the negative battery cable.


Testing
Checking Coil Resistance

  1. Disconnect the idle air control motor connector and connect the jumper (test harness).
  2. Measure the resistance between terminal (2) of the connector at the idle air control motor side and terminal (1) or terminal (3). Standard value: 28-33 ohms at 68°F
  3. Measure the resistance between terminal (5) of the connector at the idle air control motor side and terminal (6) or terminal (4). Standard value: 28-33 ohms at 68°F
  4. If not within specifications, replace the IAC Valve.
  5. If within specifications, check connectors and wiring between the sensor and ECM/PCM.
Checking Operation Sound
  1. Check that the operating sound of the stepper motor can be heard over the idle air control motor when the ignition switch is turned to the ON position (without starting the engine).
  2. If no operating sound can be heard, check the stepper motor drive circuit. (If the circuit is good, a defective stepper motor or engine control module is suspected.)

      0029f4e.gif
    IAC picture--mounted on top side of engine.
      Throttle body--loosten clamp to right of throttle body and pull hose off. Use electric parts cleaner or carb cleaner--spray on dirt with engine running. don't touch any sensors inside throttle body--sensors are delicate.
    b9362af.gif

    Oct 11, 2010 | 2005 Mitsubishi Endeavor

    1 Answer

    When i turn on heater or fan engine revs over 3000 rpm


    Idle Air Control Valve Pintle may be bad If you disconnect the IAC and the problem ceases it can point to this being the problem.: Removal & Installation 3.5L Engine To Remove:
    1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.
    2. Remove the fuel injector sight shield.
    3. Drain the cooling system.
    4. Remove or disconnect the following:
      • The air cleaner intake duct. Figure of IAC and TPS electrical connectors disconnected. aurora_g1.gif

      • The idle air control (IAC) valve and throttle position (TP) sensor electrical connectors. Figure of cruise control and throttle control cables removed from throttle lever. aurora_g2.gif

      • The cruise control cable and throttle control cable from the throttle body lever.
      • The fuel pressure regulator vacuum hose, positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) hose and the throttle body vacuum port hose.
      • The throttle body coolant hoses.
      • The throttle control cable bracket, leaving the throttle and cruise cables connected.
      • The upper nut holding the throttle body to the intake manifold.
      • The throttle body assembly.
    5. Clean the gasket mating surfaces.
    To Install:
    1. Install a new gasket and new studs if necessary.
    2. Install or connect the following:
      • The throttle body assembly.
      • Start the top nut by hand.
      • The throttle body coolant hoses.
      • Position the throttle control cable bracket and hand start the retaining nuts and bolt.
      • Torque the three throttle body retaining nuts to 89 in.lbs. (10 Nm). And the bracket retaining bolt to 115 in.lbs. (13 Nm).
      • The throttle body vacuum port hose, PCV valve hose and the fuel pressure regulator hose.
      • The throttle control and cruise control cables to the throttle body lever.
      • The IAC valve and TP sensor electrical connectors.
      • The air intake duct.
    3. Refill the cooling system.
    4. Install the fuel injector sight shield.
    4.0L Engine To Remove:
    1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.
    2. Relieve the fuel system pressure.
    3. Remove or disconnect the following:
      • Negative battery cable.
      • The Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensor electrical connector.
      • The air cleaner intake duct.
      • The PCV valve fresh air tube. Figure of cruise control cable removed from throttle cable bracket. aurora_g3.gif

      • The cruise control cable and throttle control cable from the bracket.
      • The cruise control cable and throttle control cable from throttle body lever. Figure of IAC valve and TPS connectors removed. aurora_g4.gif

      • The idle air control (IAC) valve and throttle position (TP) sensor electrical connectors. Figure of fuel lines removed from retainer on throttle cable bracket. aurora_g5.gif

      • The fuel feed and return lines from the retainer on the throttle control cable bracket.
      • The transaxle shift cable clip from the throttle control cable bracket. Figure of throttle body removed from water crossover. aurora_g6.gif

      • The throttle body from the water crossover.
    To Install:
    NOTE: The Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensor inlet and the outlet of the air cleaner assembly must line up when installed. Misalignment may cause MIL illumination or driveability concerns.
    1. Install or connect the following.
      • The throttle body to the water crossover. Torque the bolts to 106 in.lbs. (12 Nm).
      • The IAC valve and TP sensor electrical connectors.
      • The throttle and cruise control cables to the throttle body lever.
      • The throttle and cruise control cables to the throttle control cable bracket. The transaxle shift cable clip to the throttle control cable bracket.
      • The fuel feed and return line retainer to the throttle control cable bracket.
      • The MAF sensor electrical connector.
      • The air cleaner intake duct clamp. Torque the clamp to 27 in.lbs. (3Nm).
      • The PCV valve fresh air tube.
      • The fuel injector sight shield. Torque the nuts to 20 in.lbs. (2.3 Nm).
    2. Install the negative battery cable.
    3. Pressurize the fuel system and verify no leaks.
    prev.gif next.gif

    Oct 07, 2010 | 2001 Oldsmobile Alero

    2 Answers

    My truck idling low


    You replace alot of things but you should replace the EGR valve and the throttle positioning valve also. I would start with the EGR valve

    May 16, 2009 | 1993 Ford Ranger SuperCab

    1 Answer

    Olds alero 2.4 idle fuel pressure


    most likely idle air control sensor or low engine coolant I know sounds funny but IAC uses coolant to regulate idle. Idle air control valve or throttle body positioning sensor.

    Dec 10, 2008 | 1999 Oldsmobile Alero

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