Question about 1992 Nissan Pickup

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Fuel and Temperature Guages

When the vehicle is first started (cold engine - 6 cyl) both fuel and temperature guages move to extreme right far side. After driving approximately 10-15 miles the guages adjust back to the proper readings.

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Have your alternator output checked; the voltage regulator might be failing.
You can check it easily across the battery terminals.
You shouldn't have any more than ~ 14.3 volts at any revs., and about 12.6 with the engine off.

If it checks out OK, the next step would be to access any plugs to the instrument panel, pull the connectors apart and then replug them.
You may have a flaky ground under the dash too.

Posted on Jun 30, 2008

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What does faulty temp sensor has to do with starting of the car?


When a temp sensor goes bad, it usually fails to a setting that makes the ECM think the coolant temperature is about -40 degrees F. This makes the ECM send MASSIVE amounts of fuel to the injector(s) in what it thinks is an extremely cold start. This causes the engine to flood and makes for a hard start. You may be able to get the car started if you do a "Clear Flood" procedure, which is to hold the gas pedal to the floor while cranking until the car starts. Even then, though, the car will run so rich that you may have to keep revving the engine to keep it from stalling out at idle. On the road, it may seem better, but your fuel mileage will be awful.

Oct 10, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

Tip

Another Tip for saving fuel and sometimes correcting hard-starts and other...


Almost all vehicles nowadays are equipped with an engine coolant temperature sensor. They are in place to tell the vehicle's computer (PCM) what the temperature of the engine is at any time. In a lot of cases, it acts like an electronic carburetor choke.

For instance, when the temperature outside is 32 degrees F and the car has been sitting outside long enough to cool down to that temperature, the temp reflected from the coolant temp sensor SHOULD be telling the computer, "Its 32 degrees here inside the engine so dump extra fuel so it can start!" (Kind of like a closed choke on carbureted engines, only no moving parts except for the fuel injectors."

But what if that's not what the coolant temp sensor is reading? What if it thinks the temperature is 200 degrees F inside that 32 degree engine? In this case, it will report to the computer that the engine is already warmed up and minimal fuel will be required to start the vehicle. Hence, a hard or no-start!

A mis-calibrated (worn out) coolant temperature sensor can also cause a lot of driveability issues as well. For instance, if this had been the opposite scenario...The engine is actually 200 degrees F but the sensor thinks it's 32 degrees, this will cause the engine to run extremely rich, throw a light on the dash, and most likely stall out.

In my opinion, the coolant temperature sensor is arguably one of the most important sensors on your vehicle. If it's checked and/or changed regularly (I would change it about every 50,000 miles or so) this will be one of much forgotten steps in providing good fuel economy and good driveability...Not to mention good cold starts when the weather outside is frightful!

The good news about replacing this handy little guy? Two things. Inexpensive and easy to replace! The coolant temperature sensor can be purchased at most (if not all) auto parts stores (depending on your make and model regarding immediate availability.) For example, on a '98 Chrysler Sebring, Auto Zone has the sensors available for $25.99.

You can usually locate your coolant temperature sensor on or near the thermostat housing. (Again, vehicle make and model will vary in some cases regarding location.) It will usually have 2 wires leading to it. If you see a sensor with only one wire, you've found the coolant sending unit for your coolant gauge.

I hope this tip has helped you and I wish you another year of safe driving and good driveability!

-Jason_MKG :)

on Jan 11, 2010 | Chevrolet Blazer Cars & Trucks

Tip

Cold Starting Problems? Consider this before expensive dealership bills!


Almost all vehicles nowadays are equipped with an engine coolant temperature sensor. They are in place to tell the vehicle's computer (PCM) what the temperature of the engine is at any time. In a lot of cases, it acts like an electronic carburetor choke.

For instance, when the temperature outside is 32 degrees F and the car has been sitting outside long enough to cool down to that temperature, the temp reflected from the coolant temp sensor SHOULD be telling the computer, "Its 32 degrees here inside the engine so dump extra fuel so it can start!" (Kind of like a closed choke on carbureted engines, only no moving parts except for the fuel injectors."

But what if that's not what the coolant temp sensor is reading? What if it thinks the temperature is 200 degrees F inside that 32 degree engine? In this case, it will report to the computer that the engine is already warmed up and minimal fuel will be required to start the vehicle. Hence, a hard or no-start!

A mis-calibrated (worn out) coolant temperature sensor can also cause a lot of driveability issues as well. For instance, if this had been the opposite scenario...The engine is actually 200 degrees F but the sensor thinks it's 32 degrees, this will cause the engine to run extremely rich, throw a light on the dash, and most likely stall out.

In my opinion, the coolant temperature sensor is arguably one of the most important sensors on your vehicle. If it's checked and/or changed regularly (I would change it about every 50,000 miles or so) this will be one of much forgotten steps in providing good fuel economy and good driveability...Not to mention good cold starts when the weather outside is frightful!

The good news about replacing this handy little guy? Two things. Inexpensive and easy to replace! The coolant temperature sensor can be purchased at most (if not all) auto parts stores (depending on your make and model regarding immediate availability.) For example, on a '98 Chrysler Sebring, Auto Zone has the sensors available for $25.99.

You can usually locate your coolant temperature sensor on or near the thermostat housing. (Again, vehicle make and model will vary in some cases regarding location.) It will usually have 2 wires leading to it. If you see a sensor with only one wire, you've found the coolant sending unit for your coolant gauge.

I hope this tip has helped you and I wish you another year of safe driving and good driveability!

-Jason_MKG :)

on Jan 11, 2010 | Chrysler Sebring Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Idiling high, temperature guage not working. no check engine light on. no problems shifting, fan coming off & on, blowing hot & cold air. can drive it, but it wont start up right away &


Check the cable to the temp sender unit is attached if so check the unit is working with a ohms meter. check the throttle cable is not binding ,the throttle leaver stop at the throttle body housing should be fully closed .

Mar 18, 2014 | 2005 Ford Escape XLT

1 Answer

2006 f150- temperature gauge stays cold but "check gauges" flashes in mini message center.


Since the temp gauge is not working correctly, you get the warning message.
Could be a faulty temp sensor or a problem in the wiring harness.

Apr 08, 2013 | 2006 Ford F-150

1 Answer

2000 ford windstar guages fluctuate when first started


Hello
The Engine and Automatic Transmission (not applicable to manual transmissions) in this vehicles drive train are fully electronically controlled by a computer called the PCM and TCM (Power Train Control Module, Transmission Control Module). When a problem like this or other drive-ability related problems occurs the computer stores a record of the problem (there are of course some exceptions to this, like the fuel pump, engine coolant temperature sensor and MAF sensor for instance) in the form of a fault code in its memory, to read these fault codes you must have the systems memory scanned with a special tool. Once the fault code(s) are read you then must perform the appropriate diagnostic testing to find and resolve the problem(s) DO NOT REPLACE ANY PARTS UNTIL A TRAINED TECHNICAIN HAS DIAGNOSED THE PROBLEM TO AVOID SPENDING YOUR HARD EARNED MONEY ON PARTS THAT MAY NOT CORRECT THE PROBLEM. Also always check fuel pressure for correct spec for your make and engine type.

Sep 04, 2012 | 2000 Ford Windstar

1 Answer

Where is the temperature sensor for the temperature gage


Engine Temperature Sensor Operation:00116_engine_temp_sensor.jpgThis sensor monitors the temperature of the engine and sends that information to the engine control computer to regulate the amount of fuel needed - more if engine is cold and less if it's hot. The signal generated can also be sent to the temperature gauge as a visual indicator of overheating and imminent danger

I checked with autozone.com and their site says that the engine temperature sensor is not used on both engine sizes available for this vehicle.

The Coolant Temperature Sensor is used though. So maybe it has a dual purpose on your vehicle.

Coolant Temperature Sensor Operation:00113_coolant_temp_sensor.jpgThis sensor monitors the temperature of the engine and sends that information to the engine control computer to regulate the amount of fuel needed. More fuel is needed if the engine is cold; less if it's hot. If the temperature is extreme, the signal will be sent to the temperature gauge as a visual indicator of overheating and imminent danger.

Because ECT (engine coolant temperature) sensor procedures vary depending upon their location, first locate the part. You may need to partially drain the engine coolant to prevent coolant spillage.
  • Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  • Unplug the ECT.
  • Then, unscrew it.
  • Reverse the removal procedures to install the new part.
  • Connect the negative battery cable to the battery.









Nov 03, 2010 | 1995 Chevrolet Caprice Classic

1 Answer

The guages on my F350 super duty go crazy while driving


Two possible fixes : 1. Replacing the GEM module. 2. Check the electrical connections including wires.

Jun 01, 2010 | 2003 Ford F350 Super Duty DRW SuperCab

1 Answer

Inoperable instrument guages


check instrument voltage stabilizer.

Oct 17, 2008 | 2005 Nissan Pathfinder

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