Question about 1999 BMW 318 ti

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Rear Brake Pads, Discs/Hub

I have recently replaced the brake discs and pads all round which I have always found very easy with other cars I have owned previously. My problems have been two fold.

Firstly after removing the old rear disc/hub I encountered a problem fitting the new pads. I prised back the cylinder as far as it would go, however the problem didn't seem to be related to this. With the metal securing hooks of the first pad firmly secured in to the piston and cleanly situated in position against the one face of the caliper, the second pad didn't have enough room for it's back plate to clear the caliper and therefore slide into the correct positon. I took the sliding part of the caliper off and settled both pads to each extreme of the remain caliper to check if the disc had ample room to sit between, which it did. It was like the wear areas of the pad were too wide to allow them to go in. Any ideas? Were these the correct pads or am I being very studip and missing something obvious?

My second problem arose after accepting defeat and putting the old pads back in with the new discs as I had to get the car back on the road. The handbrake as almost need function. i had checked the wear in the internal brake shoes which looked fine still. Is there an adjustment to make them make better contact with the drum?

Any assistance would be much appreciated.

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Make sure there genuine bmw parts i have come across this before with spurious parts in other cars
were you new discs same width as the old ones

Posted on Feb 27, 2010

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Whot is the differance betwean a rear disc hub and a rear drum hub on a 99 focus


the only difference between a disc and a drum brake is that with a disc brake is that the brake pads are being squeezed into the disc to stop and with a drum brake the brake pads are being pushed on the inside of the drum to stop the vehicle

Apr 11, 2011 | 2000 Ford Focus

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How to change brake pad and check rotors


Brake Pads Removal & Installation Front for_car_toy_cam_02-04_sst_frt_dsc_asm.gif

To Remove:
  1. Drain brake fluid to ½ full level in reservoir.
  2. Remove the front wheels. toy_car_cam_frontbrakepads.gif

  3. Remove the front brake caliper assembly.
  4. Remove the 2 anti-squeal shims from each of the 2 brake pads.
  5. Remove the wear indicator from each of the 2 brake pads.
To Install:
NOTE: When replacing worn pads, the anti-squeal shims must be replaced together with the pads.
toy_car_cam_frontbrakepads.gif

  1. Using a large C clamp or equivalent press piston into the caliper.
  2. Apply disc brake grease to the inside of each anti-squeal shim.
  3. Install the anti-squeal shims on each pad.
  4. Install the pad wear indicator clip to the pads.
  5. Install the pads with the pad wear indicator plate facing upward.
  6. Install the brake caliper with the 2 mounting bolts. Torque the bolts 25 ft-lb (34 Nm).
  7. Install the front wheels.
  8. Fill the master cylinder with new clean brake fluid.
  9. Pump the brake pedal several times to seat the brake pads.
Rear TMC made rear brake components toy_car_cam_tmcrearbrakes.gif

TMMK made rear brake components toy_car_cam_tmmkrearbrakes.gif

To Remove:
  1. Drain the brake fluid to ½ full level in reservoir.
  2. Remove the rear wheels.
  3. Remove the caliper slide pins.
  4. Remove the caliper slide pin bushings (TMMK made) (Kentucky).
  5. Remove the rear brake calipers.
  6. Remove the 2 brake pads with the anti-squeal shims.
  7. Remove the anti-squeal shims and pad wear indicators from brake pads.
To Install:
  1. Using a large C clamp or equivalent press the piston into the caliper.
  2. Coat both sides of the outer anti-squeal shim with pad grease.
  3. Install anti-squeal shims to each pad.
  4. Install wear indicators on the 2 brake pads.
  5. Install the caliper slide pin bushings (TMMK made) (Kentucky).
  6. Install the rear brake caliper with the slide pins. Torque the slide pins as follows:
    • TMC made (Japan): Torque the caliper slide pin 25 ft-lb (34.3 Nm)
    • TMMK made (Kentucky): Torque the caliper slide pin 34 ft-lb (47 Nm)
  7. Fill the master cylinder with new clean brake fluid.
  8. Pump the brake pedal several times to seat the brake pads.
  9. Install the rear wheels.
prev.gif next.gif Brake Rotor Removal & Installation Front To Remove:
  1. Remove the front wheels.
  2. Remove the front brake caliper assembly.
  3. Remove the front brake pads.
  4. Remove the 2 bolts and caliper mounting bracket.
  5. Place match marks on the disc and axle hub.
  6. Remove the front wheel disc.
To Install:
  1. Align the match marks and install the front disc.
  2. Install the brake caliper mounting bracket. Torque the bolts 79 ft-lb (107 Nm).
  3. Install the brake caliper. Torque the bolts 25 ft-lb (34 Nm).
  4. Install new gaskets and connect the brake hose to the caliper with the banjo fitting bolt. Torque the fitting bolt 22 ft-lb (29.4 Nm).
  5. Fill the reservoir with brake fluid.
  6. Bleed the brake system.
  7. Install the front wheel.
Rear To Remove:
  1. Remove the rear wheels.
  2. Remove the brake caliper assembly.
  3. Remove the brake pads.
  4. Remove the 2 bolts and the caliper mounting bracket.
  5. Place match marks on the disc and axle hub.
  6. Remove the rear disc.
To Install:
  1. Align the match marks and install the rear disc.
  2. Install the rear brake caliper mounting bracket. Torque the bracket bolts as follows:
    • TMC made (Japan): Torque the bracket bolt 46 ft-lb (61.8 Nm)
    • TMMK made (Kentucky): Torque the bracket bolt 34 ft-lb (47 Nm)
  3. Install the rear brake caliper with the slide pins. Torque the slide pins as follows:
    • TMC made (Japan): Torque the caliper slide pin 25 ft-lb (34.3 Nm)
    • TMMK made (Kentucky): Torque the caliper slide pin 32 ft-lb (43 Nm)
  4. Install new gaskets and connect the brake hose to the caliper with the banjo fitting bolt. Torque the fitting bolt 22 ft-lb (29.4 Nm).
  5. Fill the reservoir with brake fluid.
  6. Bleed the brake system.
  7. Install the rear wheel
prev.gif next.gif

Jan 25, 2011 | 2007 Toyota Camry

1 Answer

What tools needed to replace front brake pads & rotors


Brake Pads
Removal & Installation
Front





3.4L front disc brake assembly
toy_4run_34_frontbrakeassembly.gif








4.0L and 4.7L front disc brake assembly
toy_4run_frontbrakeassembly.gif



To Remove:


  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of
    this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:

    • Front wheel
    • Clip, 2 caliper pins, the anti-rattle spring then remove the 2 brake pads
      and the 4 anti-squeal shims

To Install:

CAUTION
Only replace brake pads on 1 side of the
vehicle at a time. Failure to use this procedure could cause the caliper pistons
on the opposite side of the vehicle to pop out requiring the reconditioning or
replacement of the brake caliper.


  1. Remove a small amount of brake fluid from the master cylinder.
  2. Install a used brake pad into the caliper and compress the caliper pistons.
  3. Apply disc brake grease to both sides of the inner anti-squeal shims.
  4. Install or connect the following:

    • Anti-squeal shims to the new brake pads
      NOTE: When replacing worn pads, the anti-squeal shims must be replaced
      together with the pads.

    • 2 brake pads
    • Anti-rattle spring and the 2 caliper pins
    • Clip
    • Front wheel

  5. Depress the brake pedal several times to seat the brake pads.
  6. Check the brake fluid level and top off as needed.

Rear
To Remove:


  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of
    this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:

    • Rear wheel






      toy_4run_rearcalbolts.gif



    • 2 cylinder slide pins from rear caliper assembly
    • Caliper assembly from rear caliper mounting
    • 2 brake pads with anti-squeal shims from rear caliper mounting
    • 2 anti-squeal shims from each disc brake pads
    • Pad wear indicator plate from the inner side disc brake pad
    • 4 pad support plates from the rear caliper mounting

To Install:


  1. Install or connect the following:

    • 4 pad support plates on the rear caliper mounting
    • Pad wear indicator plate on the inside brake pad
      Note: Install the pad wear indicator facing downward.

    • Anti-squeal shims on each brake pad
    • 2 disc brake pads with anti-squeal shims to the caliper assembly

  2. Apply lithium soap base glycol grease to the sliding part of 2 caliper slide
    pins.
  3. Install or connect the following:

    • Disc brake caliper assembly with 2 caliper slide pins
    • Torque to 65 ft-lbs (88 Nm)
    • Rear wheel

  4. Depress the brake pedal several times to seat the brake pads.
  5. Check the brake fluid level and top off as needed.
--- Removal & Installation
Front
To Remove:


  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of
    this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:

    • Front wheel
    • Front brake caliper assembly

  3. Make matchmarks on the disc and the axle hub.
  4. Remove the front disc.

To Install:


  1. Align matchmarks and disc onto axle hub.
  2. Install or connect the following:

    • Front brake caliper assembly with the 2 bolts

      1. Torque to 90 ft-lbs (123 Nm)

    • Front wheel

Sep 23, 2010 | 2003 Toyota 4Runner

1 Answer

Replace rear brake pads


Rear disc brake pads offer better performance and are not as affected by moisture like conventional brake shoe style brakes are. Rear disc brakes are similar to front disc brakes. The main difference is that rear disc brake systems must incorporate the emergency brake system. There are two methods widely used for the emergency brake with rear disc systems. The first system is a brake shoe inside the brake disc that is actuated by the emergency brake lever. The second is a screw style actuator inside the brake caliper. When activated the brake pads are forced into the brake disc and held tightly by the emergency brake lever.
READ COMPLETELY BEFORE STARTING
Step 1 - Identify Rear Disc Brake Components
rear_brake_pads.jpg Rear disc brake assembly includes; rear brake disc, rear brake pads, brake caliper mount and a caliper mounting screw. (Note: Some vehicles do not have the rotor mounting screw.)
Step 2 - Removing the Rear Brake Caliper Mount Bolts
rear_brake_pads_2.jpg To replace rear brake pads and rotors the rear brake caliper needs to be removed. First loosen the rear brake caliper mount bolts and remove them. Turn counter clockwise.
Step 3 - Lift Rear Brake Caliper from The Caliper Mount
rear_brake_pads_3.jpg After the caliper mount bolts have been removed, gently lift the brake caliper from the caliper mount. Inspect the caliper slides; they should move freely in the caliper mount. Remove rear brake pads and hardware.

Step 4 - Removing Caliper Mount Bolts
rear_brake_pads_4.jpg With a socket wrench or other appropriate removal tool, loosen the rear brake caliper mounting bolts. Remove bolts and lift the caliper mount and remove it from the vehicle. Remove the retaining screw from the disc mounting hole. Tap the rotor gently to release any rust that has accumulated between the rotor and bearing hub. Lift brake rotor from wheel hub holding on tightly, using both hands. You do not want to drop the rotor.

Step 5 - Removing Rear Brake Rotor
rear_brake_rotor.jpg Remove the retaining screw from the disc mounting hole, tap the rotor gently to release any rust that has accumulated between the rotor and bearing hub. Lift brake rotor from wheel hub, hold on using both hands and do not drop.

Step 6 - Install New Brake Rotor
rear_brake_rotor_2.jpg Check the new rotor against the old brake rotor to make sure they are the same size. Clean the mating surface on the wheel hub before the new brake rotor is installed. Reinstall rotor retainer screw.
Step 7 - Reset Rear Brake Caliper
rear_brakes_7.jpg Before new brake pads can be installed, the rear brake caliper must be reset. The reset tool winds the piston back into position so the new brake pads will fit. This style of brake caliper will not compress with a clamp tool; it can only be reset with the proper reset tool.
Step 8 - Reinstall Rear Caliper Mount and Install New Rear Brake Pads
rear_brake_rotor_3.jpg After the caliper has been reset, reinstall caliper mounting bolts and make sure the bolts are tight. Then match up the old brake pads to the new brake pads. They should be exactly the same except, of course; the old ones will be worn out. Check the new brake pads for proper fit and install any brake hardware that is required.
Step 9 - Remount Rear Brake Caliper
rear_brake_rotor_4.jpg Reinstall the brake caliper, align brake pad hardware and reinstall caliper mounting bolts. (Note: align the rear peg of the brake pad to the groove in the caliper piston.) Recheck and retighten all caliper and caliper mount bolts. Bleed brake system to relieve any air in the system. Before driving the vehicle, push the brake pedal down and let it up slowly. This operation forces the brake pads to travel to the brake rotors. DO NOT DRIVE VEHICLE until proper brake pedal operation resumes. When test driving vehicle listen for any unusual noises during the operation of the brakes.
WARNING! Always have the vehicle under inspection on level ground, in park with the emergency brake on. Always wear protective eyewear, gloves and necessary clothing before inspection or work begins. Never crank an engine over when anyone is near the battery or engine. Always have an operational fire extinguisher close by, obey all first aid instructions in the event of an injury. Never stand in front or behind a vehicle when cranked over or running. When engine is cranked over keep hands and clothing away from rotating components. Never move a car without proper brake pedal operation.

Jun 01, 2010 | 1995 Saab 900

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Ford transit 02plate/fwd brake judder..ive had new pads/discs,cv joint,bearings,drive shaft.yet i still got juddering when breaking(not as bad as b4)garage says only thing left is faulty discs(very slight...


you mention replacing the discs/pads. how long ago? the fault described is usually caused by warped brake discs as you mention it comes on the onset of braking. i advice replacing the discs.

Feb 21, 2010 | 2002 Ford Escort

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Rear brake pads wear out every 30000 miles on 2002 3/4 tod hd , rotors are pitted bad


That's to be expected and is completely normal.

Rear brake shoes as fitted to drum brakes can typically last up to 60k miles with periodic adjustments, but you have rear disc brakes and the shoes will typically last half of that.

Also, modern brake pads no longer contain asbestos and are now made using harder metallic compounds; the direct result is that brake discs (US=rotors) are also considered to be consumable items as they are worn down by the harder pads. It's not unusual to have to replace front discs every other pad change and rear ones with every pad change; in both cases the mileage will typically be around 30k miles on most models.

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1 Answer

Right rear pad and worse


The problem described here indicates that you may have the AWD (full time 4WD) drivetrain of the 2003 Element.

It is normal to have 1 side of the vehicle to have increased wear due to the transmission differential, that allows your vehicle's wheels to move at different speeds from the others (turning, inclines, etc.)

Your brake pads really need constant inspection and possible replacement (approx 5,000 miles) with everyday driving, and is really a consumable item like your fuel.

You will find that it is much cheaper to replace the brake pad/lining of your disc brakes than grinding down the supposedly shiny discs that slow down your vehicle.

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Hope this helps.

Jun 30, 2009 | 2003 Honda Element

1 Answer

How to change rear brake pads


Raise the rear of the vehicle and make sure it is securely supported. Remove the rear wheel Remove the brake hose (A) from the suspension arm by removing the brake hose clip (B).Thoroughly clean the outside of the caliper to prevent dust and dirt from entering inside.Support the caliper with a piece of wire so that it does not hang from the brake se.f2d9a24.jpg
Remove the two guide rods (C) and caliper (D) from the bracket. Remove the pad shim (A) and brake pads (B).77fcb0a.jpg

Remove the pad retainers.2884b28.jpg
Clean the caliper thoroughly; remove any rust, and check for grooves and cracks. Check the brake disc for damage and cracks. Install the pad retainers. Check the foreign material at the pad shim (A) and the back of the pads (B). Contaminated brake discs or pads reduce stopping ability. Keep grease off the discs and pads.3fdca95.jpg
Install the brake pads (B) and pad shim (A) on the caliper bracket. Install the inner pad with its wear indicator (C) facing down ward. If you are reusing the pads, always reinstall the brake pads in their original positions to prevent a momentary loss of braking efficiency. Rotate the caliper piston (A) clockwise into the cylinder, the align the cutout (B) in the piston with the tab (C) on the inner pad by turning the piston back. Lubricate the boot with rubber grease to avoid twisting the piston boot. If the piston boot is twisted, back it out so it is positioned properly.1d2811d.jpg
Install the brake caliper (D). Install and torque the guide rods (E) to proper specification. Install the brake hose (F) onto the suspension arm with the brake hose clip (G). After installation, check for leaks at hose and line joints and connections, and retighten if necessary. Depress the brake pedal several times to make sure the brakes work, then test-drive. Engagement of the brake may require a greater pedal stroke immediately after the brake pads have been replaced as a set. Several applications of the brake pedal will restore the normal pedal stroke.

May 31, 2009 | Hyundai Motor 2002 Elantra

1 Answer

Toyota Camry 2005-Brake pads noise problem


The rear brakes should last from 30000 to 60000 miles or 50000 to 100000 kms. So something is wearing out your brakes too fast. Are you doing the work or some shop. I also assume you have discs and not drums since you mention pads and calipers. I am not certain but usually you need a tool to turn the pistion in when putting in new pads. I would make sure the pads are releasing properly by raising rear of car, stepping on brakes a few times (with engine off and try see if wheels are free by spinning by hand, also try to use handbrake a few times and release it and see if wheels spin freely. Maybe rears always applied. Notice burning smell, are discs glazed from heat? Are you using really cheap pads. Also check the proportioning valve which will decrease pressure to rear brakes during hard braking. Do you notice rear wheels squeling during hard braking. Do you have antilock brake system? Also are you using good quality pads and rotors.

Apr 30, 2009 | 2004 Toyota Camry

2 Answers

Repairing hand brake for BMW 328i 1997


remove the rear brake discs and you'll find the handbrake behind it. good luck.

Mar 11, 2009 | 1997 BMW 328

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