Question about 1994 Volvo 850

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Turbo not working

94 850 - the turbo boost gauge is in the middle4 and stays there when the engine is off. The tubo quit working and the engine is very sluggish. The air filter was filty dirty so I changed it and the performance was better ,but still no turbo. Any known problems or fuses, relays, sensors that I should check ?

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 Look for faulty wiring or corroded connections??...check fuel pump relay it may be a fuse.

did the check engine light came on? did it come up with code 1171 

if so...I would clear the code and drive the car for a while and see if it (code) comes back. Also notice when you drive how well it runs and is the power the same? I think that the MAF (mass air filter) is beginning to fail. Many times I see fuel trim codes all by themselves, and the cure is the MAF. Mass Air Flow sensor. MAF and labor $400 or so depending on the labor rate. 

or...


check the cam sensor this affects the spark only as the 20valve version has separate ignition and fuel ECU's
the cam sensor is located under the distributor

Posted on Jun 23, 2008

  • vanessa helman
    vanessa helman Jun 23, 2008

    i noticed my answer above had cut off sentences so here it is again:

     Look for faulty wiring or corroded connections??...check fuel pump relay it may be a fuse.

    did the check engine light came on? did it come up with code 1171 

    if so...I would clear the code and drive the car for a while and see if it (code) 
    comes back. Also notice when you drive how well it runs and is the power the same? I think that the MAF (mass air filter) is beginning to fail. Many times I see fuel
     trim codes all by themselves, and the cure is the MAF. Mass Air Flow sensor. 
    MAF and labor $400 or so depending on the labor rate. 

    or...


    check the cam sensor this affects the spark only as the 20valve version has 
    separate ignition and fuel ECU's
    the cam sensor is located under the distributor

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Try changing the fuel relay first. under the fuses, big relay. shop around for prices, it is expensive. if poss, go to a junk yard and find a used one and see if it helps. that way, if it does, you buy a new one and keep it in reserve for the next time. if it doesn't work , you aren't out alot of money, then we can go from there.

Hope that helps.......

Posted on Jun 23, 2008

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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I have just had air mass sensor fitted, swirl pipes removed,and intake manifold de-coked, 250 miles later tubo has failed i e,blades come loose, is there a connection


The cause of damage There are several main causes of turbocharger damage:
Find your cause by checking what was your Turbo's condition.

Oil/lubrication

To work effectively, a turbo needs a constant flow of clean oil, and to keep your turbo in top condition, you need to ensure that you change the oil and oil filter regularly.
This helps to prevent the build up of carbon deposits and contaminants that can cause abrasive damage to the inside of your turbocharger, reducing its efficiency and causing irreparable damage over time. Fully synthetic oil produces the least amount of carbon.

Foreign objects

Sometimes, foreign objects like broken engine components, dust particles, small stones, dirt and leaves can enter your turbocharger, either via the compressor inlet or the turbine inlet.
These can then cause impact damage and abrasion to the compressor wheels and turbine blades, which will start to reduce the efficiency of the turbo. To prevent this happening, you need to ensure that your air filter is serviced regularly, and that you check your turbo for loose connections or debris.

Over-speeding

A turbocharger works by increasing the air pressure in an engine (check out our beginners FAQ for further info).
If there are any leaks, cracks or poor seals between the compressor and the engine, the turbo will have to work much harder than it should have to increase this pressure. This will reduce the efficiency and boost delivered by the turbo.

Other causes

In addition to the causes listed above, excessive exhaust gas temps (EGT's), moisture ingress, wear and tear, fuel intake systems, the wastegate and the exhaust system can also cause damage to your turbocharger.
The warning signs There are several ways that your vehicle will let you know that its turbo is in need of maintenance or repairs:
Check engine warning lights - On most modern cars, the computer diagnostics will pick up turbo faults and the check engine light will come on. Of course, the check engine light doesn't just cover turbo failure, and you will need to do some further checks to see what kind of engine problem you have.
The boost gauge - Some turbocharged vehicles are fitted with a boost gauge, which lets you know how much boost your turbo is producing (you can also fit one to your car if desired). If your boost gauge isn't going up as much as it used to, then there is a good chance your turbo is in need of repair.
Power loss - If you notice that your turbocharged vehicle is accelerating more slowly than usual, or isn't capable of reaching the speeds it once could, this may be a sign that your turbo is failing.
A smoking exhaust - If the turbo housing has cracked, or the internal seals have blown, oil will start to leak into your exhaust system. As this burns off, it produces a distinctive blue/grey smoke, which will probably become more apparent as the engine revs increase just following an idle situation.
A loud whining noise - Often, a failing turbocharger will make a loud, distinctive noise when under boost - a bit like a dentist's drill or police siren if compressor wheel damaged. If you start to hear this noise from your engine, it's definitely time to have it checked out!
The next steps - checking your turbo If you notice any of the warning signs, then get your turbo checked as soon as possible. Your turbocharger isn't going to repair itself, and the longer you leave it, the worse (and more expensive) the problem will get!
At AET, we're always happy to help with the cost-effective diagnosis and repairs on a full range of turbochargers. Alternatively, if you're mechanically minded and aren't afraid of looking under the bonnet, you can check for a range of faults yourself by inspecting the turbo.
Essentially, you are looking for signs of oil, excessive movement, impact damage and contact between the compressor wheel and housing.
Before you start the process, we recommend checking the air filter, exhaust system, breather system and fuel system on your vehicle are all working properly, as these can cause similar symptoms to turbo failure.
Once you've done that, you'll need to remove the air filter to gain access to the turbo. First, examine the exterior, checking for any signs of oil or loose connections.
Then, check the compressor wheel - it should be clean, without any dings, chips, or signs corrosive pitting. Look out for evidence of excessive movement, ensuring that the wheel can't touch the housing, and check to see whether the turbocharger is able to rotate freely.
I you are feeling particularly ambitious; you can also check the exhaust side of the turbo. First, remove the exhaust pipe all the way to the turbo, so you can see the turbine wheel. This should look clean, with no carbon build up, scale or oil along the surface, and the blades should be free from cracks, wear and damage.

Jan 13, 2018 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Replace normal engine in 87 supra with turbo 7mgt, complete with harness and computer. the tac did not work, the temp gauge reads hot at all time, key on engine not started it reads hot. changed cluster...


Check for crushed/shorted wires.
Check part numbers to verify model compatibility.
If to no avail install aftermarket tachometer and turbo boost gauges.

Sep 21, 2017 | 1987 Toyota Supra

1 Answer

Engine light staying on and no turbo power. Code P2622


I am assuming that by "no turbo power" you are meaning that the boost gauge is not registering and pressure?
You most likely need to have your turbo rebuilt. The check engine light is coming on as a result of the bad turbo.

May 07, 2011 | Ford Super Duty Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

No power from turbo at all. Rear exhaust seal was loose but I still can't stop exhaust from leaking at this point. Turbo spins well without and signs of being loose. It does not seem to build pressure of...


tubo units get compressor drive power from the exhaust pressure acting on the turbine wheel, not after the turbine wheel so exhaust pipe /flange leaks are non effective
what you problem indicates is a holes in the intake system after the compressor wheel from bad intercooler pipes /hoses loose and or holes in the intercooler
another place of failure is a faulty boost dump valve that is not allowing pressure to build up at all
make sure that the air filter is new as any restriction is a problem
of course you could always take the car to an accredited turbo repair shop and just talk about it and get information as to the possible problems

Sep 13, 2017 | 1995 Dodge Ram 3500

1 Answer

What feeds the boost gauge? On my 87 Supra Turbo, my boost gauge isn't working properly. Is it vacuum operated? Or are it's readings supplied by the MAF or MAP?


The boost gauge is fed by the Turbo. It tells you how much extra air the turbo is putting into your engine. This is turbo ONLY. Usually a little plastic line from the turbo to the gauge.

Mar 05, 2010 | Toyota Supra Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Mk3 Supra Turbo Boost Gauge Problems


The gauge is working fine, the turbo will not kick in untill the engine is spinning fast enough, as the turbo is propelled by exaughst from the engine. So, you can drive around normal and never use the turbo, and climb in the gas and spool the turbo up, what you are noticing is called turbo lag, which is the biggest down fall when compaired to superchargers!

Feb 23, 2010 | Toyota Supra Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

97 legacy no boost


The second turbo simply follows the first when the system activates it by bringing it in parallel with the first. The first turbo is only designed for a 1200cc motor so it can not deliver enough compressed air at revs for a bigger motor so they arrange to bring in a second turbo of the same size when the first one runs out of puff.
The first turbo is a semi-mechanical device. The ecm raises the boost level at which it operates but it should be producing some boost regardless.
So concentrate on the first turbo.
Isolate it from the ecm control system
(There is a misleading tip on youtube involving pulling hoses but it is misguided, the comment is ignorant, and I do not recommend it)
Instead, as per the manual, on the first turbo remove the system pressure lines from exhaust and wastegate. Loop a short piece of vacuum hose from the primary turbo output to its own wastegate.
Blank off the system hoses you disconnected. Fit a boost gauge, drive it and observe the boost gauge readings (manifold pressure). If the primary turbo is OK this will make it operate at a lower boost level (5-7psi ?) than the system control (10-17psi) but it will be a purely mechanical operation which will isolate where the fault is.
If there is no boost and the pressure stays zero down then the turbo is not working. Check for the wastegate being stuck or maladjusted. If that is working then you bave a faulty turbo for whatever reason. Maybe there is a loose bolt stuck in it from the engine rebuild?

If the turbo is working OK then it points to an electrical issue with the the boost control solenoid which is inside the wing near the vacuum tank beside the battery compartment. The control voltage from the ecm usually pulses it on/off at a fast rate to give a measured control and it may be stuck. Maybe it is the ecm or maybe the valve. But before you go dig it out, first check the pressure lines such as 10 and 23 are connected or not reversed at their connectors where they go through the wing (just behind the battery)
Good luck

Jan 30, 2010 | 1996 Subaru Legacy

1 Answer

Complete loss of boost


Yup your turbo is toast, ive had the same thing happen on a nissan skyline. The smoke you describe is the oil escaping from the turbo core and burning off in the dump pipe.Even though you managed to get the nut back on the compressor wheel the damage to your exhaust wheel, bearings and shaft is already done, chances are you'l be missing a few fins in the exhaust wheel to say the least, it would've propelled itself in the exhuast housing probably spinning at atleast 25,000 rpm.The turbo in the gt4 is a stong unit, just how much boost were you running? :)

Jan 11, 2009 | 1996 Toyota Celica

1 Answer

Doesn't seem that the turbo is working


with the engine cold remove the turbo outlet hose and check for free rotation of the spindle. if it is ok check the wastegate capsule link arm mechanism is not seized as this is fairly common. if all is ok check the pipe work from the turbo outlet to the intercooler (lh side below airfilter headlaamp area) then from intercooler through up to inlet manifold. if all is ok, get a manual pressure gauge on the take off port at rear of inlet manifold should be a pipe blocked off with a rubber bung (lh side back of manifold) (lh side is gear box side of engine) drive car an see what the gauge reads. if it is registering boost then is often the manual boost transducer module on the right hand wheel arch by the cam belt cover that is not working so boost is there just does not register in the car.full boost is not achieved until car is at normal operating temp. if no boost turbo may need checking for wastegate operation or damage on the exhaust side. Hope this helps

Jul 20, 2008 | Lotus Elan Cars & Trucks

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