Question about 2003 Chrysler PT Cruiser

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PO134 PT engine lighyt came on -OBDII said PO134 (oxygen sensor). Wires are good, so I changed both (127000 miles). I did reset the ECU. Anytime i do under 40 MPH light comes back on , no mather how many times I RESET IT. Can anybody help ??

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Try checking for a vacume leak it will mimc o2 sensor issues

Posted on Jun 18, 2008

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My 96 prelude keeps shutting off when hot. What do I do to fix it?


96's are kinda the bad year for our cars being the only obd2 4th gen preludes so for any codes over 43 you have to look it up in the '97-'01 manual. Code 65 is "Secondary Heated Oxygen Sensor Heater Circuit Malfunction (Sensor 2)". Probable causes are an open in the secondary O2 sensor heater circuit or bad ECU. Have you tried resetting the ECU to see if it comes back? If so, you could check for loose wires coming from the secondary O2 sensor in the cat converter going to the 4 pin connector, or if you have access to another ECU I would try to substitute a known good ECU to see if that clears it up. The troubleshooting flowchart is on page 11-79 in the '97-'01 helms manual, and involves checking resistances and for continuity.

I think this could be the code I had on my '96 when I bought it. I tried replacing the secondary O2 sensor, and long story short it was the ECU. Luckily my '96 was still under the extended emmissions warranty, so Honda replaced it for free. I don't think you would be covered under the extended warranty because it was 14 years and under 150k miles. I just barely made it (within a month or 2 and 3k miles) last year.

As far as the engine sounds and rough idle, you could just need a valve adjustment. The secondary O2 sensor just checks the cat to make sure it's working right.

And all auto trans want to move forward when the brake is released.

Aug 02, 2015 | 1996 Honda Prelude

1 Answer

I pulled codes with a OBDII code reader and it gave me three codes. (1) P1166- Primary HO2S (No.1) Heater System Electrical. (2) PO134- O2 Sensor circut no activity detected (bank 1 Sensor 1). (3) PO845-...


You have a burned Oxygen sencer, and the transmission pressure sencer is bad also. Your heater has a bad switchover circuit. Hope this helps.

Feb 25, 2011 | 2003 Honda CR-V

2 Answers

The engin light is service soon part pv154


P0154 is an OBDII code for a 'lazy' O2 sensor, it is not switching fast enough for the ECU to adjust parameters when managing your engine-you probably are over 100,000 miles now, they get a coating on them that makes them react slower than expected-time to replace, they run about $50 and are pretty easy to change.

Feb 10, 2011 | 2000 Oldsmobile Intrigue

2 Answers

97 CV - Chk Eng light on - something about oxygen sensor??? BUT - in cold weather - has little to no PWOWER in accellorating - UNLESS I allow the engine to "warm-up" for a while?>???


if the oxygen sensor is bad it will either not send or send the wrong signal to the ecu making the engine think it is running rich on fuel so the ecu cuts back the fuel supply

Jan 10, 2011 | 1997 Ford Crown Victoria

1 Answer

The Egine Lights of my Kia Sportage 1999 is always on when i am driving and it wont turn off. Some mechanic recommend that i must replace the cat convertor and oxygen sensor can that be true before i buy...


Hi.

When the check engine lights comes on there are codes stored in the ECU module (car main computer.
To know what must be replaced you need to find out what codes are stored in the ECU.
Post 1995 codes adhere to OBDII standard (see here: Kia OBD-II Trouble Codes). The codes can be retrieved connecting the ECU to a code scanner (like this:Actron CP9575), and performing a scan.
If you live in the US, code scanning can be done for free at the nearest Autozone, otherwise you can have a code scanning done at your garage for a small fee.

Regarding the mechanic's suggestion of replacing the cat convertor and oxygen sensor, that is probably based on testing. If the mechanic has checked the emissions, and emissions are hight though the engine is OK, then it may time to replace the cat converter. The mechanic can also decide to replace the cat converter if the part is not in good shape.

If the decision is based on an O2 sensor OBDII code,before replacing the sensor better having a quick look at emission and engine.

The best way to proceed is generally determined by the code returned and by the checkup of state of the engine, O2 sensor, and exhaust system.

Regards.

Ginko.

Jan 07, 2011 | 1999 Kia Sportage

1 Answer

I am wondering if anyone else is having fuel injection problems? My 98 S-10 ext cab with 4.3 Vortec with 96000 miles is drinking gas (only 12mpg) and has a strong smell of gas from the tail pipe. I am...


I can add two two extra possible causes: 1) faulty coolant temperature sensor/low coolant/air in coolant. When the engine is started from the cold the ECU enriches the fuel mix to keep the engine idling; this explains why engines idle high (1000 -1200rpm) at start up. As the engine warms up the coolant temperature sensor signals this and the ECU shortens the injection cycle to eventually bring the engine down to a steady idle (700-800rpm). How to check? Most often the coolant sensor is quite separate to the temperature sender, so a correct read-out on the dash board does not necessarily indicate correct sensor function. Using a voltmeter the resistance across the electrical terminals on the sensor can be measured. By removing the device from the car and putting the end of the sensor in a pan of hot water it should be possible to see an immediate change in resistance, it does not matter so much that the resistance goes up or down but that there is a disernable resistance change with change in temperature. Generally high resistance equates to cold temperatures and vice versa. If there is no resistance change commensurate with temperature change then the sensor is at fault. If there is simply no resistance measurable (open circuit) then the sensor is at fault. If the sensor is working correctly check the connector, the wiring and the wiring insulation for faults and possible shorting.


2) faulty oxygen sensor on the exhaust manifold. If the oxygen sensor indicates that there is too much oxygen in the exhaust the ECU will enrich the fuel mix to compensate. How to check? An issue with oxygen sensors is that they steadily lose effectiveness with age and they can under perform for quite a while before they trigger an error code on the ECU. Ensure the connection to the oxygen sensor is robust and clean. As the oxygen sensor only works when hot there is the danger of getting burnt by working on it so a safe approach is to find the electrical connection on the wiring harness remote from the oxygen sensor and to make voltage measurements there. Most garages have systems that can record the amplitude and frequency of the voltage peaks being produced by the oxygen sensor. A less sophisticated means to get some impression of the oxygen sensor function is to use a moving coil galvanometer type voltmeter (analogue needle on dial). Setting the voltage range to 1 volt and by attaching the meter leads across the sensor wires it should be possible to see the rhythmic pulsing and the voltage range of the operating sensor output. If no pulses are seen it could be either a break in the wire or a fault with the sensor itself.

Dec 09, 2010 | 1998 Chevrolet S-10 Pickup

2 Answers

Reset computer in doege stratus wont pass inspection drove 50 miles and computer still didnt reset help


U have to operate the engine at all kinds of diff speeds and drive modes, it is called a OBDII drive cycle, here is how u do one.
1. As soon as the engine starts, idle the engine in drive for two and a half minutes with the A/C and rear defrost on. OBDII checks oxygen sensor heater circuits, air pump and EVAP purge.

2. Turn the A/C and rear defrost off, and accelerate to 55 mph at half throttle. OBDII checks for ignition misfire, fuel2_bing.gif trim and canister purge.

3. Hold at a steady state speed of 55 mph for three minutes.

OBDII monitors EGR, air pump, O2 sensors and canister purge.

4. Decelerate (coast down) to 20 mph without braking or depressing the clutch. OBDII checks EGR and purge functions.

5. Accelerate back to 55 to 60 mph at half throttle. OBDII checks misfire, fuel trim and purge again.

6. Hold at a steady speed of 55 to 60 mph for five minutes.

OBDII monitors catalytic converter efficiency, misfire, EGR, fuel trim, oxygen sensors and purge functions.

7. Decelerate (coast down) to a stop without braking. OBDII makes a final check of EGR and canister purge

Jun 02, 2010 | 2004 Dodge Stratus

1 Answer

SERVICE ENGINE SOON LIGHT ON


you need to change the oxygen sensor. it will soon cause you problems. after you need to take it in to  erase the code.

Apr 20, 2009 | 1997 Chrysler Town & Country

1 Answer

2000 PT CRUISER


How about the MAF sensor?

Oct 18, 2008 | 2001 Chrysler PT Cruiser

1 Answer

1999 vw jetta 2.0


Sounds like two problems. P0300 and P0303 are possibly spark plugs. They could be a coil pack but I'm leaning toward a spark plug problem because of the other two codes - they're indicating O2 sensor problems. If the O2 sensors are screwed up, the car reverts to preprogrammed, rich fuel maps that send excessive fuel through the engine. The reasoning is, if the ECU can't trust the O2 sensors to determine how much fuel to burn optimally, it'll pump a bunch of extra fuel through the engine to keep it safe. Having too little fuel (aka running lean) can destroy an engine, so the ECU plays it safe and runs rich (too much fuel) instead. The consequences of rich running are relatively minor compared to lean running, but can and do tend to create excessive carbon buildup on the catalytic converter and O2 sensors, as well as fouling spark plugs.

First thing to do though is to swap the wires on your coil packs and see if you end up with a misfire code for the same cylinder #3. If you do, then it's the plug or wire. If it moves, it's the coilpack. Replace whichever part is faulty. You'll probably need oxygen sensors too, before you can clear all the codes.

Aug 27, 2008 | 1999 Volkswagen Jetta

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