Question about Chevrolet S 10

1 Answer

What is the easiest way to replace oxygen sensor

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Hot-Shot:

    An expert who has answered 20 questions.

    Corporal:

    An expert that hasĀ over 10 points.

    Mayor:

    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 2 times.

  • Contributor
  • 24 Answers

Drill and tap a new hole in the pipe just after the current 02 sensor, simply because removing old 02 sensors are more work.

Posted on Nov 07, 2010

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
New users get 2 Free calls (no credit card required) and instant help on almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, appliances, handyman, and even pets).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

Tip

Which Oxygen Sensor Is It?


There are many inquiries online about which oxygen sensor to change. Oxygen sensor failure codes are very common on a lot of vehicles. With all of today's vehicles having at least two oxygen sensors and many having three or four of them, it can be a little confusing as to which one is causing the problem.

Before we get into which sensor is which, we need to have a little discussion about oxygen sensor fault codes. There are several different types of oxygen sensor fault codes. Here are just some of the most common ones:

P0135 "Oxygen Sensor Heater Circuit Bank1 Sensor 1"
P0141 "Oxygen Sensor Heater Circuit Bank 1 Sensor 2"
P0147 "Oxygen Sensor Circuit Bank 1 Sensor 3"
P0152 "Oxygen Sensor Voltage High Bank 2 Sensor 1"
P0159 "Oxygen Sensor Slow Response Bank 2 Sensor 2"
P0171 "Oxygen Sensor Lean Sensor 1 Bank 1"
P0172 "Oxygen Sensor Lean Sensor 1 Bank 2"
P0174 "Oxygen Sensor Rich Sensor 1 Bank 1"
P0175 "Oxygen Sensor Rich Sensor 1 Bank 2"

There are many more possible oxygen sensor codes, but I only listed these to make my point. Many times the oxygen sensor code is NOT caused by the oxygen sensor itself. "Lean" or "Rich" oxygen sensor codes (i.e. P0171, P0174) are usually caused by something other than the oxygen sensor. Something is wrong, causing the engine to run lean (not enough fuel or too much air) or causing the engine to run rich (too much fuel or not enough air). In these cases, replacing the oxygen sensor will not fix a thing. (That is, unless you are trying to fix your bank account from having too high of a balance!) The new oxygen sensor will just set the same code as the original one. This is because the oxygen sensor is not CAUSING the problem, it is only REPORTING the problem.

High voltage codes (like P0152 above) can be caused by the oxygen sensor wires being shorted to another wire inside the wiring harness. Sometimes these codes are caused by bad grounds where some other component is trying to ground through the oxygen sensor circuit. Again, replacing the oxygen sensor will not fix this! In short, the problem needs to be diagnosed before running out and buying an oxygen sensor.

Just because a fault code has "Oxygen Sensor" or "O2 Sensor" or "O2S" in its description does not necessarily mean that an oxygen sensor needs to be replaced. Many do-it-yourselfers believe that all there is to fixing the car is to hook it to the "magic box", collect the fault codes and replace the parts the computer tells you to replace. There is nothing further from the truth.

Fault codes only point you toward which SYSTEM is failing. The system must be diagnosed to find the CAUSE of the failure. If this is not done properly, it will only result in wasting a bunch of your money. This is what you were trying to avoid by doing it yourself!

So, after reading all of the above, if you think you still want to replace an oxygen sensor, but don't know which one; here is how to figure it out:

Oxygen sensors are always numbered like this:

Bank 1 Sensor 1
Bank 2 Sensor 1
Bank 1 Sensor 2
Bank 2 Sensor 2

Some manufacturers use a kind of shorthand that reads different, but means the same thing:

Sensor 1/1 or O2s 1/1
Sensor 2/1 or O2s 2/1
Sensor 1/2 or O2s 1/2
Sensor 2/2 or O2s 2/2

Bank 1 is always the side of the engine where cylinder #1 is located and, of course, Bank 2 is the opposite side.
On a 4 cylinder engine, there is only one bank and it is always referred to as Bank 1. The exception to the 4 cylinder rule is on certain 4 cylinder engines (specifically, some Toyotas) there are two catalytic converters used. In this case, Bank 1 sensors will still be in the pipe for the catalyst that is connected to cylinder #1 and Bank 2 sensors will be in the other one.

Sensor 1 is always the "upstream" sensor (the one located BEFORE the catalytic converter).
Sensor 2 is always the "downstream" sensor (the one that is located AFTER the catalytic converter).
Sensor 3 refers to the ONLY "downstream" sensor where there are two sensors before the catalyst and only one after the catalyst. On very few vehicles the reference to this reads "Bank 1 Sensor 3".

If you do not know where cylinder #1 is, then you need to get a diagram of the firing order for your engine. Just post a question on FixYa.com and make sure you give the YEAR, MAKE, MODEL, and ENGINE SIZE of your vehicle and one or more of our experts will be happy to tell you how to find cylinder #1.

- DTTECH
ASE Certified Master Automobile Technician


Also check out this article by dttech: What Else Could Be Wrong?

on Apr 29, 2011 | Ford F-150 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Chevy Silverado error p1151


P1151 Lack of Upstream Heated Oxygen Sensor Switch - Sensor Indicates Lean - Bank No. 2


p1131 p1151 p0171 p0174 p1131 p1151 p0171 p0174
All of these p1131 p1151 p0171 p0174 codes indicate a problem with a lean condition. This engine is known for vacuum leaks, so before you start throwing oxygen sensors at the problem, it pays to perform some diagnostics.
Start by cleaning the MAF sensor. Spray the sensor with CRC MAF sensor cleaner. Next, check the plastic vacuum lines, especially where they meet with rubber boots. If they are cracked or the rubber is swollen, replace the line. Then check the rubber elbow that holds the PCV valve. That elbow is a know failure point. In fact, the entire PCV tubing is a trouble spot on these engines. (thanks Ford).
After you've checked for vacuum leaks, check the operation of the oxygen sensors. The easiest way to do that is to disconnect the sensor from the harness. Connect one lead of your digital voltmeter to the black wire on the sensor and the other lead to battery negative. Then start the engine and add fuel (either propane, starting fluid, or carb cleaner) into the throttle body to force the mixture to rich. You should see a corresponding increase in voltage as you add fuel (from 0 volts to slightly less than 1 volt). Start and stop the fuel enrichment and watch the meter to see if the volts drop as you stop adding fuel. If you see no change, the sensor is dead. Replace it.
You can also use the fuel enrichment procedure to locate intake gasket leaks.
P1131 Lack of Upstream Heated Oxygen Sensor Switch - Sensor Indicates Lean - Bank No. 1
P1151P1151 Lack of Upstream Heated Oxygen Sensor Switch - Sensor Indicates Lean - Bank No. 2
P0174 system lean bank 2
P0171 system lean bank 1


This is the only info that didn't come back directly to FORD (yet still mentions it) instead of GM. Not to sure you got the correct code.

Jul 08, 2014 | 1999 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

2 Answers

Check engine light on, 0430 code


This code is not uncommon with the X-Type, a dealer will recommend replacing the Cat. very expensive. get a 1" spark plug extender and drill a 1/2 hole through it and screw it into the lower O2 sensor hole for bank 2 (rear of the engine) and then screw the O2 sensor into it, reset the code and you should be all set.

Jan 04, 2014 | 2002 Jaguar X-Type

1 Answer

How do I replace an oxygen sensor (code 21) in a 1993 Toyota Camry?


you need oxygen socket and 3/8 ratchet wrench.easy way to replace oxygen sensor is to start vechicle let run few minutes just enough to get exhaust system hot so it will make it easier remove oxygen sensor.just remove heat shields disconnect oxygen sensor electrical connector then replace oxygen sensor.use penetrating oil let it soak around oxygen sensor for 20 minutes that will help make it easier to remove sensor.

Sep 16, 2013 | Toyota 4Runner Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Need to replace oxygen sensor


TO REPLACE OXYGEN YOU NEED A SLOTTED SOCKET AND A TUBE ANTI SEIZE COMPOUND. MOST OF THE TIME NEW OXYGEN SENSOR ALREADY HAS ANTI SEIZE COMPOUND USED ON THE THREADS.TO REPLACE OXYGEN SENSOR FIRST CRANK VECHICLE FOR A FEW MINUTES SO YOU CAN REMOVE OXYGEN SENSOR MORE EASILY. ONCE YOU GET THE EXHAUST LITTLE WARM.YOU DISCONNECT OXYGEN SENSOR CONNECTOR TAKE SLOTTED SOCKET REMOVE OXYGEN SENSOR APPLY ANTI SEIZE ON OXYGEN SENSOR THREADS THE SCREW IT IN PLACE..WEAR LONG SLEEVES COVERALLS, SAFETY GLASSES KEEP RUST PARTICLES GETTING INTO YOUR EYES. AND LEATHER GLOVES KEEP HANDS FROM CUTS AND EXHAUST BURNS. IF YOU REPLACING DOWN STREAM OXYGEN SENSOR YOU HAVE TO RAISE VECHICLE SUPPORT ON JACKSTANDS. FOR UP STREAM OXYGEN SENSOR YOU CAN REPLACE WITHOUT RAISING THE VECHICLE.REASON I SAY CRANK ENGINE TO WARM UP EXHAUST SYSTEM BECAUSE METAL EXPANDS WHEN HOT THAT MAKES REMOVING OXYGEN SENSOR EASIER. IF YOU DONT CRANK VECHICLE THE COLD CAUSES METAL TO SHRINK MAKING HARDER TO REMOVE OXYGEN SENSOR.POSSIBLY DAMAGING SENSOR THREADS WHILE TRYING TO LOOSEN SENSOR FROM EXHAUST MANIFOLD OR PIPE. YOU CAN BUY SLOTTED SOCKET AND ANTI SEIZE COMPOUND AT ANY AUTO PARTS STORES.

Dec 30, 2010 | 1998 Lexus ES 300

1 Answer

Trying to replace both oxygen sensors having a hard time gettin to them tryin to figure out the best and easiest way to get to and remove them and what tool would be best on a 2002 ford escort zx2


The "Before" CAT O2 sensor is easy, just remove the exhaust heat shield and you should have enough space to get to it. The "After" CAT O2 Sensor is a bit harder; I found the easiest way to do that is to remove the right wheel and it will expose an opening that you can reach through to break it loose.

Sep 17, 2010 | 2002 Ford Escort

1 Answer

My 2003 Kia Optima check engine light keeps coming on. I was told "Bank 1 Sensor 1" needs to be replaced. Where is Bank 1 Sensor 1?


P0130 Oxygen Sensor Circuit Malfunction - Bank 1 Sensor 1.
P0131 Oxygen Sensor Circuit Low Voltage - Bank 1 Sensor 1.
P0132 Oxygen Sensor Circuit High Voltage - Bank 1 Sensor 1.
P0133 Oxygen Sensor Circuit Slow Response - Bank 1 Sensor 1.
P0134 Oxygen Sensor Circuit No Activity detected - Bank 1 Sensor 1.
P0135 Oxygen Sensor Heater Circuit Malfunction - Bank 1 Sensor 1


Jun 23, 2010 | 2003 Kia Optima

1 Answer

Catalytic converter or oxygen sensors?


i would replace the oxygen sensor first as it is the cheapest and easiest

Nov 06, 2009 | 2004 Hyundai Santa Fe

Not finding what you are looking for?
Cars & Trucks Logo

Related Topics:

51 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Chevrolet Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

76630 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22219 Answers

Jeff Turcotte
Jeff Turcotte

Level 3 Expert

8516 Answers

Are you a Chevrolet Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...