Question about 1987 Pontiac Bonneville

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Check Engine Light

I have the 3.8 v6 in my car. When I scan the car for codes it comes back with a MAP sensor voltage low. When I call part shacks, they all say they don't list a map sensor for my car. The car bucks and tries to die out unless I really stay on the throttle. So is it going to be a dealer only part? And if so where the heck is the sensor at on my car? Thanks in advance

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  • chrismND Jun 14, 2008

    PLEASE HELP

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Hi,
tough one this, but you never know. The MAP sensor is usually located on the inlet maniforld, however, if the car shacks say they don't have one listed, i suspect this is because the MAP will be integral with the ECU. To test this theory, locate your ECU, and if it's got a vacuum pipe going to it (from the inlet man), thats where your MAP is. Could be bad news if it is, but often the problem is gunge in the pipe leading to the MAP or gunge in the map.
Before you go off to the dealer with a fat wallet, its worth considering having a go at DIY.
First check the pipe, and if it is blocked or partially blocked suspect the MAP is dirty too. These sensors vary in design, but all are essentially the same. Remove ECU and carefully take it apart to check the MAP. Its not rocket science (as the dealers would have you believe) and any fault should be "findable" using a bit of common sence. Remember that most faults of this kind (>90%) are mechanical.
Forgot to mention, also check if the pipe is leaking or split etc.

All the best, and good luck....Dave

Posted on Jun 14, 2008

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Smog code p0108


this is for the MAP sensor , it can also be a wiring fault and not the actual sensor so i've copied and pasted to save time a guide
Symptoms Possible sumptoms of OBD code P0108
MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) will likely be on Engine may run poorly Engine may not run at all Fuel mileage may decrease Presence of black smoke at exhaust
Causes Possible causes of OBD code P0108
Bad MAP sensor Leak in vacuum supply line to MAP sensor Engine vacuum leak Short on signal wire to PCM Short on reference voltage wire from PCM Open in ground circuit to MAP Worn engine causing low vacuum
Possible Solutions A good way to diagnose if the MAP sensor is to blame would be to compare the KOEO (key on engine off) MAP sensor reading on a scan tool with the Barometric pressure reading. They should be the same because they both measure atmospheric pressure. If the MAP reading is greater than 0.5 volt off of the BARO reading, then replacing the MAP sensor would likely fix the problem. Otherwise, start the engine and observe the MAP reading at idle. It should normally be about 1.5 volts (varies according to altitude). a. If it is, the problem is likely intermittent. Check all the vacuum hoses for damage and replace as necessary. You can also try wiggle testing the harness and connector to reproduce the problem. b. If the scan tool MAP reading is more than 4.5 volts, check the actual engine vacuum reading with the engine running. If it is less than 15 or 16 in. Hg, then the PCM is probably not seeing enough vacuum (due to a worn engine, perhaps) for a given operating condition (which causes a higher than normal voltage signal to the PCM) and setting the code. Repair the engine vacuum problem and retest. c. But, if the actual engine vacuum reading is 16 in. Hg or more, then unplug the MAP sensor. The scan tool MAP reading should indicate that there is no voltage present. Check that the ground from the PCM is intact and also that the MAP sensor connector and terminals are tight. If the connection is good, then replace the map sensor. d. However if, with KOEO, & the MAP sensor unplugged, the scan tool shows a voltage reading, then there may be a short in the harness to the MAP sensor. Turn the ignition off. At the PCM unplug connector and remove the MAP signal wire from the connector. Re-attach the PCM connector and see if with KOEO, the scan tool MAP reading shows voltage. If it still does, replace the PCM. If not, check for voltage on the signal wire you just removed from the PCM. If there is voltage on the signal wire, find the short in the harness and repair.

hope this helps

Jul 08, 2014 | 2001 Pontiac Sunfire

Tip

93 Saturn SL2 Does Not Start, MIL Light On


Hi, here are procedures from autozone.com for extracting trouble codes from your Saturn:

See Figure 1
To enter the self-diagnostic mode, either connect a scan tool to the ALDL or DLC. On 1991-95 models, use a jumper wire to connect terminals A and B of the ALDL. Turn the ignition switch ON , then the PCM will enter the diagnostic program and report trouble codes on the scan tool or by flashing the SERVICE ENGINE SOON light.
All codes are 2 digits between 11 and 99. Codes are displayed on the SERVICE ENGINE SOON light by flashing the light with short and long pauses to distinguish digits of one code from digits of another. The short pause is used between digits of the same code, long pauses are between different codes. For example, the Code 12 sequence will be: flash, pause, flash-flash, long pause.
  1. When the diagnostic mode is entered, Code 12 is displayed 3 times. This indicates that the internal diagnostic system is operating. If Code 12 is not displayed, the self-diagnostic program is not functioning properly. If only Code 12 is displayed, no system malfunctions have been stored.
  2. Any existing system fault codes are displayed in order from low to high, except for Code 11. Each code is displayed 3 times, followed by the next code, if any.
  3. On vehicles with an automatic transaxle and on which exist stored transaxle codes, Code 11 will be displayed last, then the SHIFT TO D2 (1991-1992 models) or HOT (1993-98 models) light will begin flashing transaxle codes or flags.
  4. When all engine and transaxle codes have been displayed, Code 12 will flash again. At this point, all output devices are driven, except the fuel pump, so these circuits can be checked.
  5. This procedure can be repeated as required by cycling the ignition switch OFF , then ON again with the ALDL terminals jumpered together. The code display will begin again as in Step 1.

jturcotte_24.gif
Fig. Fig. 1: ALDL Pinout


Here are some tests for the MAP sensor:
See Figures 1, 2 and 3
  1. Unplug the MAP sensor connector and turn the ignition switch ON . Check for about 4.5-5 volts between connector terminal C (gray wire) and ground.
  2. Check for the same voltage between terminals C and A (black wire). This is a ground through the PCM.
  3. Reconnect the wiring, then install a Saturn diagnostic probe, or equivalent, on the green wire and connect either a voltmeter probe or a scan tool to the ALDL. Connect a vacuum gauge to the intake manifold.
  4. With the ignition switch ON and the engine not running, the return signal voltage should be close to the supply voltage in Step 1, if below a 1000 ft. (305 meters) altitude. If above this altitude, see the chart for the correct voltage.
  5. With the engine at idle, there should be at least 16 in. Hg (54 kPa) of manifold vacuum and 1-1.5 volts on the signal return wire. When the throttle is opened suddenly, the signal voltage should increase. It may only change momentarily.
  6. If the voltage at idle is the same as in Step 1, or if the voltage does not change when the throttle is moved suddenly, the sensor is faulty and must be replaced.
jturcotte_25.gif

Fig. Fig. 1: With the ignition turned ON, measure the MAP sensor circuit for a reference voltage

jturcotte_26.gifFig. Fig. 2: Schematic for the MAP sensor circuit


jturcotte_27.gif
Fig. Fig. 3: MAP sensor return voltage altitude compensation chart (with the ignition ON and the engine not running)




jturcotte_28.gif jturcotte_29.gif jturcotte_30.gif jturcotte_31.gif jturcotte_32.gif jturcotte_33.gif

on Dec 26, 2010 | Saturn SL2 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Code 34 and 51


Code 34 is for the MAP sensor voltage being low which means the sensor is unplugged or faulty. Code 51 is for a problem with the memory chip inside the computer.
If the engine computer is failing it could set the code 34 even if nothing is wrong with the MAP sensor.
The computer and MAP sensor would need to be checked out.

Jul 15, 2013 | Chevrolet Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

P0108 engine light


Hi there:
DTC P0108 - Manifold Absolute Pressure/BARO Sensor High Input




Check the potential causes of a P0108 code:

Bad MAP sensor
Leak in vacuum supply line to MAP sensor
Engine vacuum leak
Short on signal wire to PCM
Short on reference voltage wire from PCM
Open in ground circuit to MAP
Worn engine causing low vacuum


Now, about the possible solutions... a good way to diagnose if the MAP sensor is to blame would be to compare the KOEO (key on engine off) MAP sensor reading on a scan tool with the Barometric pressure reading. They should be the same because they both measure atmospheric pressure.

If the MAP reading is greater than 0.5 volt off of the BARO reading, then replacing the MAP sensor would likely fix the problem. Otherwise, start the engine and observe the MAP reading at idle. It should normally be about 1.5 volts (varies according to altitude).

a. If it is, the problem is likely intermittent. Check all the vacuum hoses for damage and replace as necessary. You can also try wiggle testing the harness and connector to reproduce the problem.
b. If the scan tool MAP reading is more than 4.5 volts, check the actual engine vacuum reading with the engine running. If it is less than 15 or 16 in. Hg, then the PCM is probably not seeing enough vacuum (due to a worn engine, perhaps) for a given operating condition (which causes a higher than normal voltage signal to the PCM) and setting the code. Repair the engine vacuum problem and retest.
c. But, if the actual engine vacuum reading is 16 in. Hg or more, then unplug the MAP sensor. The scan tool MAP reading should indicate that there is no voltage present. Check that the ground from the PCM is intact and also that the MAP sensor connector and terminals are tight. If the connection is good, then replace the map sensor.
d. However if, with KOEO, & the MAP sensor unplugged, the scan tool shows a voltage reading, then there may be a short in the harness to the MAP sensor. Turn the ignition off. At the PCM unplug connector and remove the MAP signal wire from the connector. Re-attach the PCM connector and see if with KOEO, the scan tool MAP reading shows voltage. If it still does, replace the PCM. If not, check for voltage on the signal wire you just removed from the PCM. If there is voltage on the signal wire, find the short in the harness and repair.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Jun 20, 2012 | 2005 Lincoln LS V8

1 Answer

Ran an ecu fault code reader on my focus and it shows up beromatric low presure what is this ?


Hi there,

If you are correct with your code reader, this condition should trigger fault code: P0107.

This relates to your MAP/BARO Sensor's signal voltage is too low (below 0.25v).

This condition will cause all sorts of engine running issues....

First, using your scan tool with the Key on and engine running, monitor the MAP Sensor voltage. If it is reading less than 5 volts, turn engine off, unplug the MAP sensor and, using a DVOM (Digital Volt/Ohm Meter) check for 5Volts on the 5 Volt reference circuit.


1. If there is not 5 Volts on the reference circuit, then check for the reference voltage at the PCM connector. If it is present at the PCM connector but not the MAP connector, repair the open in the wiring loom between the PCM and MAP harness connector.


If 5 Volt reference is NOT present at the PCM connector, check powers and grounds of PCM and repair/replace as needed.


2. If you have a 5 Volt reference at the MAP connector, jumper the 5 volt reference circuit to the signal circuit. Now check the MAP voltage on the scan tool. It should be 4.5 to 5 Volts. If it is, replace MAP sensor. If not, repair open/short in the signal circuit wiring and re-check.


3. If all appears okay, perform a wiggle test. Start engine and manipulate the harness, connector and tap on the MAP sensor. Note any changes in voltage or engine speed. Repair connector, harness, or sensor as needed.


4. If the wiggle test checks out, use a vacuum pump (or just use your lungs) to draw a vacuum on the MAP sensor vacuum port. As you add vacuum the voltage should decrease. With no vacuum, the MAP sensor should read approximately 4.5 volts. If there is no change in MAP sensor reading on the scan tool, replace MAP sensor.



Cheers,

Sep 05, 2011 | 2001 Ford Focus

1 Answer

Engine Code P0108. The engine revs up high and back low about 10 times before idling normally when first turned on. then there is other idling issues when accelerating to hard or at a stop. Are there...


P0108 - MAP Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit High Input

The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor measures engine manifold negative air pressure. It's usually a three wire sensor: a ground wire, a 5 volt reference wire from the PCM (Powertrain Control Module) to the MAP sensor, and a signal wire that informs the PCM of the MAP sensor voltage reading as it changes. The higher the engine vacuum, the lower the voltage reading. The voltage should range between about 1 volt (at idle) to about 5 volts (WOT wide open throttle).

If the PCM sees the voltage reading from the MAP sensor is greater than 5 Volts, or if the voltage reading is higher than what the PCM considers normal under certain circumstances, a P0108 DTC will set.


Symptoms of a P0108 DTC code may include:
* MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) will likely be on
* Engine may run poorly
* Engine may not run at all
* Fuel mileage may decrease
* Presence of black smoke at exhaust


Causes: Potential causes of a P0108 code:
* Bad MAP sensor
* Leak in vacuum supply line to MAP sensor
* Engine vacuum leak
* Short on signal wire to PCM
* Short on reference voltage wire from PCM
* Open in ground circuit to MAP
* Worn engine causing low vacuum


Possible Solutions
A good way to diagnose if the MAP sensor is to blame would be to compare the KOEO (key on engine off) MAP sensor reading on a scan tool with the Barometric pressure reading. They should be the same because they both measure atmospheric pressure.

If the MAP reading is greater than 0.5 volt off of the BARO reading, then replacing the MAP sensor would likely fix the problem. Otherwise, start the engine and observe the MAP reading at idle. It should normally be about 1.5 volts (varies according to altitude).

a. If it is, the problem is likely intermittent. Check all the vacuum hoses for damage and replace as necessary. You can also try wiggle testing the harness and connector to reproduce the problem.
b. If the scan tool MAP reading is more than 4.5 volts, check the actual engine vacuum reading with the engine running. If it is less than 15 or 16 in. Hg, then the PCM is probably not seeing enough vacuum (due to a worn engine, perhaps) for a given operating condition (which causes a higher than normal voltage signal to the PCM) and setting the code. Repair the engine vacuum problem and retest.
c. But, if the actual engine vacuum reading is 16 in. Hg or more, then unplug the MAP sensor. The scan tool MAP reading should indicate that there is no voltage present. Check that the ground from the PCM is intact and also that the MAP sensor connector and terminals are tight. If the connection is good, then replace the map sensor.
d. However if, with KOEO, & the MAP sensor unplugged, the scan tool shows a voltage reading, then there may be a short in the harness to the MAP sensor. Turn the ignition off. At the PCM unplug connector and remove the MAP signal wire from the connector. Re-attach the PCM connector and see if with KOEO, the scan tool MAP reading shows voltage. If it still does, replace the PCM. If not, check for voltage on the signal wire you just removed from the PCM. If there is voltage on the signal wire, find the short in the harness and repair.


Hope helps (remember to rate this answer).

Apr 05, 2011 | 2003 Chrysler PT Cruiser

1 Answer

My 2004 forenza start good but when i step on gas it dont have power even shut off the intake manifold is dirty in the inside and the scanner give me code p0108 . PLEASE HELP!!!


P0108 Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit High Input

What does that mean? The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor measures engine manifold negative air pressure. It's usually a three wire sensor: a ground wire, a 5 volt reference wire from the PCM (Powertrain Control Module) to the MAP sensor, and a signal wire that informs the PCM of the MAP sensor voltage reading as it changes. The higher the engine vacuum, the lower the voltage reading. The voltage should range between about 1 volt (at idle) to about 5 volts (WOT wide open throttle).
If the PCM sees the voltage reading from the MAP sensor is greater than 5 Volts, or if the voltage reading is higher than what the PCM considers normal under certain circumstances, a P0108 DTC will set.

Symptoms Symptoms of a P0108 DTC code may include:
  • MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) will likely be on
  • Engine may run poorly
  • Engine may not run at all
  • Fuel mileage may decrease
  • Presence of black smoke at exhaust
Causes Potential causes of a P0108 code:
  • Bad MAP sensor
  • Leak in vacuum supply line to MAP sensor
  • Engine vacuum leak
  • Short on signal wire to PCM
  • Short on reference voltage wire from PCM
  • Open in ground circuit to MAP
  • Worn engine causing low vacuum
Possible Solutions A good way to diagnose if the MAP sensor is to blame would be to compare the KOEO (key on engine off) MAP sensor reading on a scan tool with the Barometric pressure reading. They should be the same because they both measure atmospheric pressure.
If the MAP reading is greater than 0.5 volt off of the BARO reading, then replacing the MAP sensor would likely fix the problem. Otherwise, start the engine and observe the MAP reading at idle. It should normally be about 1.5 volts (varies according to altitude).
a. If it is, the problem is likely intermittent. Check all the vacuum hoses for damage and replace as necessary. You can also try wiggle testing the harness and connector to reproduce the problem.
b. If the scan tool MAP reading is more than 4.5 volts, check the actual engine vacuum reading with the engine running. If it is less than 15 or 16 in. Hg, then the PCM is probably not seeing enough vacuum (due to a worn engine, perhaps) for a given operating condition (which causes a higher than normal voltage signal to the PCM) and setting the code. Repair the engine vacuum problem and retest.
c. But, if the actual engine vacuum reading is 16 in. Hg or more, then unplug the MAP sensor. The scan tool MAP reading should indicate that there is no voltage present. Check that the ground from the PCM is intact and also that the MAP sensor connector and terminals are tight. If the connection is good, then replace the map sensor.
d. However if, with KOEO, & the MAP sensor unplugged, the scan tool shows a voltage reading, then there may be a short in the harness to the MAP sensor. Turn the ignition off. At the PCM unplug connector and remove the MAP signal wire from the connector. Re-attach the PCM connector and see if with KOEO, the scan tool MAP reading shows voltage. If it still does, replace the PCM. If not, check for voltage on the signal wire you just removed from the PCM. If there is voltage on the signal wire, find the short in the harness and repair.

Dec 22, 2010 | 2004 Suzuki Forenza

1 Answer

What is the 1987 pontiac fiero gt v6 check engine light code list?


CODE 12- NO DISTRIBUTOR REFERENCE PULSES ECM. CODE 13- OXYGEN CIRCUIT. CODE 14- COOLANT SENSOR HIGH TEMP CODE 15- COOLANT SENSOR LOW TEMP. CODE 21 - THROTTLE POSITION SENSOR VOLTAGE HIGH.CODE 22 - THROTTLE POSITION SENSOR VOLTAGE LOW.CODE - 23 MIXTURE CONTROL SOLENOID.FOR CARBURETOR ENGINE. CODE 24 -VECHICLE SPEED SENSOR. CODE 32 - BARO CIRCUIT LOW.CODE 32 - FUEL INJECTED EGR VALVE VACUUM SWITCH SHORTED TO GROUND.OR EGR VALVE SOLENOID CIRCUIT OPEN. CODE 33 - MAP SENSOR.CODE 34 - VACUUM SENSOR OR MAP SENSOR.CODE 35 - IDLE SPEED CONTROL. CODE 41 - EST CIRCUIT. CODE 42 - ELECTRONIC SPARK TIMING.CODE 43 - ELECTRONIC SPARK CONTROL UNIT. CODE 44 - LEAN EXHAUST.CODE 45 - RICH EXHAUST. CODE 51 - PROM OR MEM CAL.CODE 52 - CALPAK. CODE 53 -EGR VALVE CARBURETED ENGINE THE EGR VALVE VACUUM SENSOR HAS RECEIVED IMPROPER EGR VACUUM. CODE 54 - M C SOLENOID CARBURETED ENGINE MIXTURE CONTROL SOLENOID SHORTED OR FAULTY ECM.CODE 54- FUEL INJECTED ENGINE FUEL PUMP VOLTAGE IS LOW.CODE 55 - ECM MAKE SURE PCM GROUND CONNECTIONS ARE TIGHT.IF OKAY.REPLACE THE ECM.

Mar 27, 2010 | 1987 Pontiac Fiero

1 Answer

I have a P0106 error code on my 97 Subaru Legacy Outback. I just had a valve job done on the heads. I put the engine back together and put it back in the car, taking great care in the process. All hoses...


Using a scan tool, watch the MAP sensor value with the key on, engine off. Compare the BARO reading with the MAP reading. They should be roughly equal. The voltage for the MAP sensor should read approx. 4.5 volts. Now start the engine and look for a significant drop in the MAP sensor voltage indicating the MAP sensor is working.

If the MAP reading doesn't change perform the following:

With the Key on, engine off, disconnect the vacuum hose from the MAP sensor. Using a vacuum pump, pull 20 in. of vacuum on the MAP sensor. Does the voltage drop? It should. If it doesn't inspect the MAP sensor vacuum port and vacuum hose to manifold for a restriction of some kind. Repair or replace as necessary.
If there are no restrictions, and the value doesn't change with vacuum, then perform the following: with the Key on and engine off and the MAP sensor unplugged, check for 5 Volts at the reference wire to the MAP sensor connector with a Digital Voltmeter. If there is none, check for reference voltage at the PCM connector. If the reference voltage is present at the PCM connector but not the MAP connector, check for open or short in the reference wire between MAP and PCM and retest.
If reference voltage is present, then check for existing ground at the MAP sensor connector. If it isn't present then repair open/short in the ground circuit.
If ground is present, then replace MAP sensor.

Mar 03, 2010 | Subaru Outback Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I have a 97 grand prix which I had just replace the upper intake manifold on as it had a hole in it allowing the engine to take coolant into the cylinders and burn it. Now the check engine check light is...


The Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor responds to changes in the intake manifold pressure (vacuum). 5 Volts is supplied to the sensor from the PCM (powertrain control module). Inside the MAP sensor is a resistor that moves in relation to manifold pressure. The resistor varies the voltage between about 1 volt to 4.5 volts (depending on engine load) and that voltage signal is returned to the PCM to indicate manifold pressure (vacuum). This signal is essential for the PCM to determine fuel delivery. A P0107 DTC is set when the PCM sees that the MAP signal voltage is less than .25 volts which is too low.

Potential Symptoms Anytime the MAP sensor signal is low the vehicle will likely have a very difficult time starting. Other symptoms may include:
  • Hard to start
  • Long cranking times
  • Sputtering/missing
  • Blowing black smoke
  • Poor fuel economy
  • Dies intermittently
  • MIL(Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
Causes The causes of a low MAP sensor signal circuit (P0107) could be any of the following:
  • Bad MAP sensor
  • Open or short in the signal circuit
  • Open or short in the 5 Volt reference circuit
  • Ground circuit open or shorted
  • Bad PCM
Possible Solutions First, using a scan tool with the Key on and engine running, monitor the MAP sensor voltage. If it is reading less than .5 volts, turn engine off, unplug the MAP sensor and, using a DVOM (Digital Volt/Ohm Meter) check for 5Volts on the 5 Volt reference circuit.
1. If there is not 5 Volts on the reference circuit, then check for the reference voltage at the PCM connector. If it is present at the PCM connector but not the MAP connector, repair the open in the reference circuit between the PCM and MAP harness connector. If 5 Volt reference is NOT present at the PCM connector, check powers and grounds of PCM and repair/replace as needed. (NOTE: On Chrysler products, a shorted Crank sensor, Vehicle speed sensor or any other sensor that utilizes the 5 Volt reference from the PCM can short out the 5 Volt reference. To fix simply unplug each sensor one at a time until the 5 Volt reference reappears. The last sensor unplugged is the shorted sensor.)
2. If you have a 5 Volt reference at the MAP connector, jumper the 5 volt reference circuit to the signal circuit. Now check the MAP voltage on the scan tool. It should be 4.5 to 5 Volts. If it is, replace MAP sensor. If not, repair open/short in the signal circuit wiring and re-check.
3. If all appears okay, perform a wiggle test. Start engine and manipulate the harness, connector and tap on the MAP sensor. Note any changes in voltage or engine speed. Repair connector, harness, or sensor as needed.
4. If the wiggle test checks out, use a vacuum pump
(or just use your lungs) to draw a vacuum on the MAP sensor vacuum port. As you add vacuum the voltage should decrease. With no vacuum, the MAP sensor should read approximately 4.5 volts. If there is no change in MAP sensor reading on the scan tool, replace MAP sensor.

Feb 28, 2010 | 1997 Pontiac Grand Prix

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