Question about 2000 Honda CR-V

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Coolant loss Hello I am loosing coolant somewhere in the system, cannot locate the leak, its not the head gasket as there is no contamination in the oil. how does one find it? and how good is k-seal?

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  • dondik Jun 10, 2008

    no funny smells or white smoke occuring from the exhaust

  • Marty marty May 11, 2010

    pressurize test cooling system and watch for leak...

  • Marty marty May 11, 2010

    you may still have a bad head gasket....a leak can occur from coolant to cylinder head...do you have a funny smelling exhaust or does the exhaust appear to have a white smoke?

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I would agree wtih 24 seven's suggestion. If the the coolant is leaking into the combustion chamber(s) it would be being blown out the tailpipe with the exhaust vapors. ALSO: Are there any strange smells coming from the heater & A/C outlets? It could be leaking somewhere in the A/C plenum and then leaking out via the condensation drain.

Posted on Dec 08, 2008

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My car has white smoke coming from the exhaust


he causes of white exhaust smoke can vary; however, it is common to see white exhaust smoke when first starting a car, especially on cooler days. This is generally steam caused by condensation. As the engine warms up and the condensation dissipates the white exhaust smoke (steam) is no longer seen. If excessive white exhaust smoke is present well after the engine warms up, it is necessary to have the car inspected for possible internal coolant leaks. Indicators of an internal coolant leak include billowing white exhaust smoke accompanied by a sweet odor or a low coolant reservoir level. An internal coolant leak can also contaminate the engine oil giving it a frothy, milky appearance. Even small amounts of coolant entering the combustion chamber will produce white exhaust smoke.
One of the main causes of white exhaust smoke and coolant loss is a cracked or warped cylinder head, a cracked engine block, or head gasket failure caused by overheating. A cracked head may allow coolant to leak into one or more cylinders or into the combustion chamber of the engine. Dirty coolant, a poorly maintained cooling system, a low coolant level, or a non-functioning cooling fan can cause engine overheating. In addition, engine wear can eventually cause the gaskets to lose their capacity to seal properly allowing internal coolant loss. Intake manifold gasket and head gasket failures are two of the most common sources of internal coolant loss caused by engine wear.
Never remove the radiator cap or coolant reservoir cap while the engine is hot or running as it can cause serious injury; always allow the car to cool down completely first. Checking for a low coolant level in the reservoir is the first step in determining if coolant loss is causing the white exhaust smoke. If the coolant reservoir is at the proper level but excessive white exhaust smoke is present, a cooling system pressure check is required to determine where, if any, coolant leaks are located.

Nov 17, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Why is there water around the spark plugs?


There's either a big loss of coolant from somewhere such as a hose or cylinder head.

It could also be a faulty cylinder head gasket/cylinder head.

Does the car overheat? Overheating is a symptom of head problems as is loss of power.

Check the coolant level - has it dropped?
Start the engine and see if any air bubbles appear in the coolant. If so, it probably is caused by exhaust gas leaking through the head/head gasket into the cooling system.

Check your engine oil dipstick. If the oil is a greyish/creamy colour that indicates coolant has found its way into the oil system. Cylinder head problem ..

Get somebody to check your car for you. Don't drive it if there's suspected head problems - you'll cause more damage

Jan 28, 2016 | 2008 Ford Fiesta 1.6

1 Answer

My 1998 Mazda millenia Is shorting white smoke more tell pipe what could be the problem


It is common to see white exhaust smoke when first starting a car, especially on cooler days. This is generally steam caused by condensation. As the engine warms up and the condensation dissipates the white exhaust smoke (steam) is no longer seen. If excessive white exhaust smoke is present well after the engine warms up, it is necessary to have the car inspected for possible internal coolant leaks. Indicators of an internal coolant leak include billowing white exhaust smoke accompanied by a sweet odor or a low coolant reservoir level. An internal coolant leak can also contaminate the engine oil giving it a frothy, milky appearance. Even small amounts of coolant entering the combustion chamber will produce white exhaust smoke. One of the main causes of white exhaust smoke and coolant loss is a cracked or warped cylinder head, a cracked engine block, or head gasket failure caused by overheating. A cracked head may allow coolant to leak into one or more cylinders or into the combustion chamber of the engine. Dirty coolant, a poorly maintained cooling system, a low coolant level, or a non-functioning cooling fan can cause engine overheating. In addition, engine wear can eventually cause the gaskets to lose their capacity to seal properly allowing internal coolant loss. Intake manifold gasket and head gasket failures are two of the most common sources of internal coolant loss caused by engine wear.
Never remove the radiator cap or coolant reservoir cap while the engine is hot or running as it can cause serious injury; always allow the car to cool down completely first. Checking for a low coolant level in the reservoir is the first step in determining if coolant loss is causing the white exhaust smoke. If the coolant reservoir is at the proper level but excessive white exhaust smoke is present, a cooling system pressure check is required to determine where, if any, coolant leaks are located. THESE LEAKS WILL CAUSE SEVERE ENGINE DAMAGE! Have the car inspected immediately.

I
Internal coolant leaks can and will cause

Jul 30, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Gurgling sound in the cab


Well yes and no. The gurgling sound is air in the cooling system moving thru the heater core. The cooling system is not full of liquid coolant.
As for the cause of the coolant loss, if you fix the external leak and you continue to loose coolant, the head gasket could also be leaking.

Feb 06, 2014 | Dodge Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Engine coolant level drops on Mercedes C180 2001 model


Loss of coolant is serious because if you allow your engine to overheat you can cause very expensive engine damage - thousands of dollars of damage (not hundreds).

The items that need looking at are:

- Radiator cap is old and faulty. This can allow coolant to escape and needs to be replaced every 4 or 5 years (sometimes sooner) with the correct spec cap - not any old product picked up at some auto store.

- External leak - you need to check all flexible coolant hoses and connections for leaks as well as around the water pump to ensure the WP gasket is not leaking

- Internal leak
The most common is a blown cylinder head gasket which can allow coolant to escape and to get into the cylinders and into the lubrication system. If getting into the cylinders you will see white smoke coming from the exhaust . You need to check the engine oil for coolant contamination as a coolant can escape into the lubrication system via a damaged head gasket. You also need to check the coolant for signs of oil escaping under pressure via the blown head gasket into the cooling system.

An internal leak can also be caused by a cracked cylinder head but if you have this condition are blown head gasket will have probably occurred around the same time.
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Dec 27, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Possibility of a cracked block. how can i be sure/


Vehicles: Any with the above symptoms

A cracked cylinder block will cause either:
(a) motor oil contamination of engine coolant
(b) coolant contamination of motor oil
(c) white exhaust smoke, due to coolant seeping into one or more cylinders.
(d) more than one of the above
(e) all of the above

Oil infiltrating into coolant is easy to see - drain some coolant out through the pepcock at the bottom of the radiator, and place it into a styrofoam coffee cup. Oil droplets floating on top of the green (or orange) coolant are easily seen. Or visualize oil by looking into the top of the radiator through the radiator cap.
Coolant infiltrating into and mixing with motor oil will permanently damage the engine (seizing it up through loss of lubrication), and must be prevented.
A leak from above the front suspension is, as physicians like to put it, "nonspecific", with the most likely cause a water pump seal or hose/hose connection.
A leak from near the fire wall will usually be a heater core hose, or hose connection.
A coolant leak on the same side of the engine as the water pump is a leaking water pump or water pump seal until proven otherwise.

To rule out everythng else, here's the 1999 Honda CR-V Troubleshooting Guide for Coolant Loss/Coolant Leaking:

Priority Action Part Type Cause
1 Inspect Water Pump - Worn, Cracked or Leaking Water Pump, or Water Pump gasket.
2 Inspect Head Gasket - Leaking Head Gasket.
3 Inspect Radiator - Leaking Radiator Hose(s).
4 Inspect Radiator Cap - Worn or Damaged Radiator Cap.
5 Inspect Radiator Hose - Ruptured, Cracked or Leaking Radiator Hose.
6 Inspect Freeze Plug - Leaking Freeze Plug(s).
7 Inspect Intake Manifold Gasket - Leaking, Worn, or Damaged Intake Manifold Gasket.
8 Inspect Water Outlet - Cracked, Leaking or Damaged Water Outlet.
9 Inspect Heater Control Valve - Leaking or Faulty Heater Control Valve.
10 Inspect Radiator Drain Pepcock - Loose, Damaged, or Faulty Radiator Drain Pepcock, or Pepcock O-ring.
11 Inspect Engine (DOMESTIC ONLY) - Cracked Cylinder Block Leaking Coolant into at least one Cylinder, causing white exhaust smoke.

Dec 03, 2011 | 1999 Honda CR-V

1 Answer

My mazda mpv 2001 coolant leaking somewhere. Filled it Saturday full line and is at low level monday afternoon.Where is it going? Van does not overheat


1. External Leaks
You need to get the vehicle to a mechanic to check all flexible coolant hoses, hose connections, around the exterior of the water pump and the entire radiator. To do properly the vehicle also needs to be on a hoist. If there is an external leak you should find coolant dripping from the front of the car while the engine is idling and the cooling system is fully pressurized. However it depends how bad the leak is and it's location.

2. Internal Leak

If coolant is leaking into the engine this is a serious problem and needs to be identified by a competent mechanic. For example, if you have a blown head gasket coolant will blow into the engine and contaminate the engine oil. If you check the oil in the engine's sump it should be completely free from coolant contamination.
You should also check the coolant in the radiator for any signs of oil contamination. If there is coolant in the oil then there will also likely be engine oil which has blown into the engines coolant passages and then mixed with the coolant.
IF you can find traces of coolant in your engine oil (or oil in the coolant) the likely problem will be a blown head gasket and the head on the engine will need to be removed and inspected .

Blown head gaskets are usually a result of an owner allowing the engine to overheat as a result of low coolant level, failed water pump or faulty thermostat. Overheating can also cause major damage to the head on the engine.

Jan 19, 2011 | 2004 Mazda MPV

5 Answers

The coolant in my renault clio keeps draining i am told its not the head gasket


The head gasket on the R 5 is aluminum,Just see if your oil is like turning a white colour.
if not then its not the top gasket and you can check the water pipes,even a small leak can cause this when the water heats up and build presure so you dont see it coz your driving.

also check the water bottle's cap if it seals properly,you can loose water from steam too...

Hope this helps...

Aug 18, 2008 | 2006 Renault R5

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