Question about 1999 Pontiac Grand Am GT

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White smoke from exhaust pipe and losing coolant

Yes, I hooked up a diagnostic meter to my car and it was showing that cylinder # 2 was misfiring. So, the first thing I did was change the spark plugs. It cranks up first thing in the mornings and then it will start idling up and down, till it warms up. Then, it seems to run fine. But, I am losing coolant and can't seem to find any leaks. It is possible that I have a blown intake or head gasket? How can I tell the difference? By taking a compression reading?

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  • hedder57 Jun 08, 2008

    I'm sorry, I didn't mention that this is a 3.4L V6. The oil color is fine and it isn't burning any oil. I've heard that these engines can leak coolant from the "lower" intake gasket, is that true? I did notice that when I read the codes that it also said the oxygen sensor was giving a bad reading, but I thought maybe that was from cylinder # 2 mis-firing causing the oxygen sensor to give a bad reading,

  • sdf1012 Oct 17, 2008

    1999 Pontiac Grand Am V6

    Runs really rough when I start it. I have to give it gas for a minute in neutral to smooth it out, then runs great. Diagnostics test showed cylinder 2 misifiring. Recently had the intake gasket replaced and there is no crack in the head. Changed the spark plugs, but still no improvement. How much could this problem cost if I take it to a shop? How long can I drive it with this problem? Thanks.

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  • Pontiac Master
  • 1,224 Answers

Ok first rule of headgasket checking to see if cracked is look at dipstick or oil in pan if looks like chocolate milk then you have a blown head gasket

other thing of white smoke oxygen sensor bad
or you have an oil rings that need replacing

Posted on Jun 08, 2008

  • Christophe Thompson
    Christophe Thompson Jun 08, 2008

    any cracks at all in the any of the major gaskets even the intake gasket would take the water straight threw to the oil cause the gaskets so close to the water ports inside the engine block this where you would get the chocolate color of of oil and coolant mixture



    now at the back of your engine there is a water jacket tube that flows the water threw this could be where your leak is coming from

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1 Suggested Answer

podbot999
  • 20 Answers

SOURCE: on lpg vehicle backfires and blows intake pipe to pieces

Hi LPG is very dependent apon plugs and lead quality, the first thing to do is replace them both with new, it may very well cure the fault.

Posted on Feb 08, 2009

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2 Answers

My car has white smoke coming from the exhaust


he causes of white exhaust smoke can vary; however, it is common to see white exhaust smoke when first starting a car, especially on cooler days. This is generally steam caused by condensation. As the engine warms up and the condensation dissipates the white exhaust smoke (steam) is no longer seen. If excessive white exhaust smoke is present well after the engine warms up, it is necessary to have the car inspected for possible internal coolant leaks. Indicators of an internal coolant leak include billowing white exhaust smoke accompanied by a sweet odor or a low coolant reservoir level. An internal coolant leak can also contaminate the engine oil giving it a frothy, milky appearance. Even small amounts of coolant entering the combustion chamber will produce white exhaust smoke.
One of the main causes of white exhaust smoke and coolant loss is a cracked or warped cylinder head, a cracked engine block, or head gasket failure caused by overheating. A cracked head may allow coolant to leak into one or more cylinders or into the combustion chamber of the engine. Dirty coolant, a poorly maintained cooling system, a low coolant level, or a non-functioning cooling fan can cause engine overheating. In addition, engine wear can eventually cause the gaskets to lose their capacity to seal properly allowing internal coolant loss. Intake manifold gasket and head gasket failures are two of the most common sources of internal coolant loss caused by engine wear.
Never remove the radiator cap or coolant reservoir cap while the engine is hot or running as it can cause serious injury; always allow the car to cool down completely first. Checking for a low coolant level in the reservoir is the first step in determining if coolant loss is causing the white exhaust smoke. If the coolant reservoir is at the proper level but excessive white exhaust smoke is present, a cooling system pressure check is required to determine where, if any, coolant leaks are located.

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Hi,

I hope I can help with this. This could mean the engine spark plugs or plug is the issue. Also check the exhaust pipe. White smoke indicates a coolant issue. Check your coolant reservoir. Black smoke indicates a Fuel issue. Blue is an oil issue. Also, speaking of your spark plugs there very well could be a misfire.

the code P303 could be cylinder 3 misfire
P102 the mass air flow sensor which is on the air filter cover. It's an electrical part and is sensor. Please check these and let me know.

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What is year--make--model?
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Lots of white smoke is coolant & failed gaskets
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It is common to see white exhaust smoke when first starting a car, especially on cooler days. This is generally steam caused by condensation. As the engine warms up and the condensation dissipates the white exhaust smoke (steam) is no longer seen. If excessive white exhaust smoke is present well after the engine warms up, it is necessary to have the car inspected for possible internal coolant leaks. Indicators of an internal coolant leak include billowing white exhaust smoke accompanied by a sweet odor or a low coolant reservoir level. An internal coolant leak can also contaminate the engine oil giving it a frothy, milky appearance. Even small amounts of coolant entering the combustion chamber will produce white exhaust smoke. One of the main causes of white exhaust smoke and coolant loss is a cracked or warped cylinder head, a cracked engine block, or head gasket failure caused by overheating. A cracked head may allow coolant to leak into one or more cylinders or into the combustion chamber of the engine. Dirty coolant, a poorly maintained cooling system, a low coolant level, or a non-functioning cooling fan can cause engine overheating. In addition, engine wear can eventually cause the gaskets to lose their capacity to seal properly allowing internal coolant loss. Intake manifold gasket and head gasket failures are two of the most common sources of internal coolant loss caused by engine wear.
Never remove the radiator cap or coolant reservoir cap while the engine is hot or running as it can cause serious injury; always allow the car to cool down completely first. Checking for a low coolant level in the reservoir is the first step in determining if coolant loss is causing the white exhaust smoke. If the coolant reservoir is at the proper level but excessive white exhaust smoke is present, a cooling system pressure check is required to determine where, if any, coolant leaks are located. THESE LEAKS WILL CAUSE SEVERE ENGINE DAMAGE! Have the car inspected immediately.

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White smoke is usually a sign for a bad head gasket. How much white smoke is coming out? Also, are you losing coolant and can't find a drip under the engine?

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Check for white smoke out the exhaust. If you have white smoke then you are burning coolant and probably have a blown headgasket. Another way for checking a blown headgasket is to open the coolant overflow tank and run the car. If you see constant bubbles in the coolant then you have a blown headgasket.

DO NOT DRIVE YOUR CAR IF the gasket it blown as the engine will overheat and the cylinder head can warp/crack.

If there is no white smoke from the exhaust and no bubbles in the coolant system there is probably jsut a leak in the coolant system, visually check all the pipes and check around the waterpump housing for leaks. If you can't see a leak then pressure test the coolant system. A pressure test will push coolant out the leak and should help you find where it is.

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One of the main causes of white exhaust smoke and coolant loss is a cracked or warped cylinder head, a cracked engine block, or head gasket failure caused by overheating. A cracked head may allow coolant to leak into one or more cylinders or into the combustion chamber of the engine. Dirty coolant, a poorly maintained cooling system, a low coolant level, or a non-functioning cooling fan can cause engine overheating. In addition, engine wear can eventually cause the gaskets to lose their capacity to seal properly allowing internal coolant loss. Intake manifold gasket and head gasket failures are two of the most common sources of internal coolant loss caused by engine wear.


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