Question about 1998 Acura TL

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How do i replace rear brake pads? And check condition or rotors?

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  • 279 Answers

The piston brake pad assembly is usually held in place by two bolts that face the car. Remove these and tap the assembly off .Hang the assembly from a wire.remove the two larger bolts that hold the rest of the assembly in place and remove the rotor.I would simply replace the rotors with after market rather than bother with the old ones.Replace rotor and larger cage.taking carefull note remove the brake pads and compress the brake piston with a C clamp. They should push back with minimal resistance.Check all brake components at this time including the large pins the brake assembly move back and forth on. Install your new pads and replace all the bits.Good luck.P.S. A digital camera might be helpfull if you haven't done this kind of thing before

Posted on Oct 24, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: 1999 Chev Blazer 6cyl 4.3L

about those brakes,, on s10 blazer,,1999,i ended up doing mine twice, but got it...you must change both calipers in back,also check rotors,,you will notice also that whan you put the pads on they might fit real tight,,look into this,,it has a floating caliper,i had to do some light fitting to pads ,,so they would fit good,but not so dam tight that they rust in one spot.they schould move freely,back and forth,,on mount,,also a big must,,use brake grease,on those caliper mount,,pins,,these have rubber boots that protect them from rusting,pull boot off,and get pin out ,,install new pins with brake grease,this alows caliper to float a bit,and helps alot..pins come with calipers, as a note ,,some times a colapesed brake hose will cause these pads to burn to the metal,,but so far mine and brother in laws both had the caliper problem..so new calipers,possible rotors,pads,brake grease,,and fit pads if they fit to dam tight...good luck chad [email protected]

Posted on Aug 04, 2008

LT1Rob
  • 55 Answers

SOURCE: 325 ci brake rotors have been replaced 4 times in 6 years

BMW rotors are not known for lasting very much more than 30-45k miles. When the brakes are inspected, they measure the pads using a special tool threw the outer brake pad. Min spec is 3mm. When the pads are replaced, they measure the thickness of the rotors. The rotor spec is stamped on the rotor. if they are under that spec, they recommend replacing them as well. Next time you bring it in for service, just ask them to measure the rotor thinkness, (its not a huge task, all they have to do is take the wheels off). But more often than not, the rotors wear just as fast as the pads.

Posted on Mar 04, 2009

  • 6982 Answers

SOURCE: replaced brake pads, extreme squeal resulted

Pads will reproduce sound just like a needle on a phonograph. Hard linings will accentuate this. Have the rotors re-surfaced and finished with a non-directional pattern(I make a quick pass with a D/A sander over surfaces while still on the lathe) Generally this will help.

Posted on Mar 30, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: how do you replace rear rotors and brake pads on 2006 Jetta

There is a special tool you need to do this. It is virtually impossible to do without this tool. I got mine from Harbor Freight for $20. the kit comes in an small orange case and has multiple heads and it pushes and turns at the same time. Do not use a C-clamp, it will damage the piston. This tool still does use some manual labor, but it is worth it when you save a few hundred dollars doing it yourself!

Posted on May 08, 2009

jaysonemanme
  • 500 Answers

SOURCE: rear brake calipers freeze and burn out pads

rubber brake hoses are collapsed

Posted on May 25, 2009

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3 Answers

Rear brakes gone within a year brand new vehicle


There is no normal as I don't know what the car is used for and how heavy the loads are and how hard you brake

Mar 18, 2014 | Dodge Grand Caravan Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My mechanic tells me I need rear brake pads and rotors as a cost of $ 320.00. I have 60000 miles on the car. I can't believe I need brakes so soon with low mileage.


The way in which a car has driven has a very direct impact on how long brake pads will last before they have to be replaced. For example, if you spend most of your time driving long distances on the highway, you're using your brakes much less often than in stop and go urban driving. I have seen cars that need brake jobs every 75,000 miles; I've seen similar cars, with different drivers and different driving routines, go 25,000 miles between brake jobs.

I would not be surprised at all if the front brake pads (and possibly rotors) of your Accord needed to be replaced at 60k miles of typical mixed driving. I am, however, somewhat surprised that your rear brakes need service at this point. The front brakes of a car typically provide much more of a car's stopping power than the rear brakes (it's a physics thing), and so they generally wear much more quickly than the rear brakes. All that said, I recently had to replace the rear brake pads and rotors of a 2002 Passat that had only 51,000 miles on the odometer. This car's pads were worn down to the metal, and one of the rotors was badly scored. Upon speaking with the owner of the car, though, things made slightly more sense. First, the car was equipped with a very active ABS braking system, which decreases front wheel braking and increases rear wheel braking depending on road conditions. As a result, the rear brakes of that car were used much more heavily than in the "average" car. Second, and more obviously, the owner admitted to forgetting to release her parking brake several times before driving off, sometimes going several miles before realizing her mistake. The emergency brake system on most cars engages the rear brakes, and driving off with those brakes still on will put a huge amount of wear on those pads in a very short distance.

One final, distant, thought is that it's possible that your rear calipers have gotten "sticky" and are not fully releasing after they have been engaged. Accumulated moisture on the brake pistons and piston channel walls can leave rust spots that hang up piston travel, leading to this condition. At the same time, it would be unusual for both brakes on the same axle to develop this problem at the same time--this typically happens one brake caliper at a time, and you notice the condition when you car begins pulling to one side when you brake or even after you release your brakes.

May 19, 2011 | 2003 Honda Accord

2 Answers

My brakes sound like they are grinding


check rear rotors and front rotors for rust buildup (flahlight helps). does the vehicle shake when you come to a hard stop? You will either need to have a front or rear or both brake job (rotors cut or replaced and new brake pads) If the vehicle is shaking when coming to a stop, its probably your front pads. If your hearing the noise from the rear its the rear pads or it you hear it from the front its the front pads. If there significant rust build up or your pads are low a brake job is recommended.

May 04, 2011 | 2008 Nissan Armada

1 Answer

My 2006 mercedes e500 brakes are squeaking when I brake. Does this mean I have to replace the brakes?


first check brake pads, are they in good condition first remove front pads and grind outer edge and inner edge 1 mm with angle from mettle part, do the same for both pads in each wheels then fix it back, do the same to the rear pads too, the problem is your brake rotors are wear, when you replace brake pads next time must need to be replace brake rotors together with the pads. is this information helped you?

Oct 27, 2010 | 2006 Mercedes-Benz E-Class

1 Answer

Replace rear brake pads


Rear disc brake pads offer better performance and are not as affected by moisture like conventional brake shoe style brakes are. Rear disc brakes are similar to front disc brakes. The main difference is that rear disc brake systems must incorporate the emergency brake system. There are two methods widely used for the emergency brake with rear disc systems. The first system is a brake shoe inside the brake disc that is actuated by the emergency brake lever. The second is a screw style actuator inside the brake caliper. When activated the brake pads are forced into the brake disc and held tightly by the emergency brake lever.
READ COMPLETELY BEFORE STARTING
Step 1 - Identify Rear Disc Brake Components
rear_brake_pads.jpg Rear disc brake assembly includes; rear brake disc, rear brake pads, brake caliper mount and a caliper mounting screw. (Note: Some vehicles do not have the rotor mounting screw.)
Step 2 - Removing the Rear Brake Caliper Mount Bolts
rear_brake_pads_2.jpg To replace rear brake pads and rotors the rear brake caliper needs to be removed. First loosen the rear brake caliper mount bolts and remove them. Turn counter clockwise.
Step 3 - Lift Rear Brake Caliper from The Caliper Mount
rear_brake_pads_3.jpg After the caliper mount bolts have been removed, gently lift the brake caliper from the caliper mount. Inspect the caliper slides; they should move freely in the caliper mount. Remove rear brake pads and hardware.

Step 4 - Removing Caliper Mount Bolts
rear_brake_pads_4.jpg With a socket wrench or other appropriate removal tool, loosen the rear brake caliper mounting bolts. Remove bolts and lift the caliper mount and remove it from the vehicle. Remove the retaining screw from the disc mounting hole. Tap the rotor gently to release any rust that has accumulated between the rotor and bearing hub. Lift brake rotor from wheel hub holding on tightly, using both hands. You do not want to drop the rotor.

Step 5 - Removing Rear Brake Rotor
rear_brake_rotor.jpg Remove the retaining screw from the disc mounting hole, tap the rotor gently to release any rust that has accumulated between the rotor and bearing hub. Lift brake rotor from wheel hub, hold on using both hands and do not drop.

Step 6 - Install New Brake Rotor
rear_brake_rotor_2.jpg Check the new rotor against the old brake rotor to make sure they are the same size. Clean the mating surface on the wheel hub before the new brake rotor is installed. Reinstall rotor retainer screw.
Step 7 - Reset Rear Brake Caliper
rear_brakes_7.jpg Before new brake pads can be installed, the rear brake caliper must be reset. The reset tool winds the piston back into position so the new brake pads will fit. This style of brake caliper will not compress with a clamp tool; it can only be reset with the proper reset tool.
Step 8 - Reinstall Rear Caliper Mount and Install New Rear Brake Pads
rear_brake_rotor_3.jpg After the caliper has been reset, reinstall caliper mounting bolts and make sure the bolts are tight. Then match up the old brake pads to the new brake pads. They should be exactly the same except, of course; the old ones will be worn out. Check the new brake pads for proper fit and install any brake hardware that is required.
Step 9 - Remount Rear Brake Caliper
rear_brake_rotor_4.jpg Reinstall the brake caliper, align brake pad hardware and reinstall caliper mounting bolts. (Note: align the rear peg of the brake pad to the groove in the caliper piston.) Recheck and retighten all caliper and caliper mount bolts. Bleed brake system to relieve any air in the system. Before driving the vehicle, push the brake pedal down and let it up slowly. This operation forces the brake pads to travel to the brake rotors. DO NOT DRIVE VEHICLE until proper brake pedal operation resumes. When test driving vehicle listen for any unusual noises during the operation of the brakes.
WARNING! Always have the vehicle under inspection on level ground, in park with the emergency brake on. Always wear protective eyewear, gloves and necessary clothing before inspection or work begins. Never crank an engine over when anyone is near the battery or engine. Always have an operational fire extinguisher close by, obey all first aid instructions in the event of an injury. Never stand in front or behind a vehicle when cranked over or running. When engine is cranked over keep hands and clothing away from rotating components. Never move a car without proper brake pedal operation.

Jun 01, 2010 | 1995 Saab 900

3 Answers

Rear brake pads wear out every 30000 miles on 2002 3/4 tod hd , rotors are pitted bad


That's to be expected and is completely normal.

Rear brake shoes as fitted to drum brakes can typically last up to 60k miles with periodic adjustments, but you have rear disc brakes and the shoes will typically last half of that.

Also, modern brake pads no longer contain asbestos and are now made using harder metallic compounds; the direct result is that brake discs (US=rotors) are also considered to be consumable items as they are worn down by the harder pads. It's not unusual to have to replace front discs every other pad change and rear ones with every pad change; in both cases the mileage will typically be around 30k miles on most models.

Nov 15, 2009 | 2002 GMC Sierra 2500HD

1 Answer

Noise from rear brakes but pads and rotors are


Did you check the emergency brakes? The rear rotors have drum brakes on the inside. You may have to loosen the adjustment to get the rotor off.

They will try your patience. Even brake shops miss the diagnosis. Hard to very hard to replace the mounting springs.

Sep 23, 2009 | Ford Mustang Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

The rear brakes grind after replacement of rotor and rear pads


check retaining clip on hand brake shoes behind rear rotor,check if shoes arent ondone from clip,check calyper and guide bolts for binding.

Mar 21, 2009 | 2000 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

1 Answer

Bad Brakes ?


It could be bad rotors, rotors can be rusted on the inside which may be only seen when the inner brake pads are removed. sometimes aftermarket pads can be made of very hard material and they may grind when they make contact with rotors. I would check the condition of the rotors by completely dismantling the rear brake and either re-surface rotors or replace them and put on some oem(dealer pads or a good aftermarket organic pad. Good Luck

Dec 06, 2008 | 1999 Ford Taurus

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