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I noted an oil leak from the compressor side of my turbocharger.Also the shaft has a slight side to side play.Is this normal? The turbo is fitted on a Mitsubishi Pajero,engine model 4d56

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The play in the turbo is why you have the leak with out rebuild shop tools all you can do is change the turbo (if a lot of oil gets into inlet
system engine can run away and will not stop ((English mechanics
call this drinking its own blood)))

Posted on Oct 24, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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I have just had air mass sensor fitted, swirl pipes removed,and intake manifold de-coked, 250 miles later tubo has failed i e,blades come loose, is there a connection


The cause of damage There are several main causes of turbocharger damage:
Find your cause by checking what was your Turbo's condition.

Oil/lubrication

To work effectively, a turbo needs a constant flow of clean oil, and to keep your turbo in top condition, you need to ensure that you change the oil and oil filter regularly.
This helps to prevent the build up of carbon deposits and contaminants that can cause abrasive damage to the inside of your turbocharger, reducing its efficiency and causing irreparable damage over time. Fully synthetic oil produces the least amount of carbon.

Foreign objects

Sometimes, foreign objects like broken engine components, dust particles, small stones, dirt and leaves can enter your turbocharger, either via the compressor inlet or the turbine inlet.
These can then cause impact damage and abrasion to the compressor wheels and turbine blades, which will start to reduce the efficiency of the turbo. To prevent this happening, you need to ensure that your air filter is serviced regularly, and that you check your turbo for loose connections or debris.

Over-speeding

A turbocharger works by increasing the air pressure in an engine (check out our beginners FAQ for further info).
If there are any leaks, cracks or poor seals between the compressor and the engine, the turbo will have to work much harder than it should have to increase this pressure. This will reduce the efficiency and boost delivered by the turbo.

Other causes

In addition to the causes listed above, excessive exhaust gas temps (EGT's), moisture ingress, wear and tear, fuel intake systems, the wastegate and the exhaust system can also cause damage to your turbocharger.
The warning signs There are several ways that your vehicle will let you know that its turbo is in need of maintenance or repairs:
Check engine warning lights - On most modern cars, the computer diagnostics will pick up turbo faults and the check engine light will come on. Of course, the check engine light doesn't just cover turbo failure, and you will need to do some further checks to see what kind of engine problem you have.
The boost gauge - Some turbocharged vehicles are fitted with a boost gauge, which lets you know how much boost your turbo is producing (you can also fit one to your car if desired). If your boost gauge isn't going up as much as it used to, then there is a good chance your turbo is in need of repair.
Power loss - If you notice that your turbocharged vehicle is accelerating more slowly than usual, or isn't capable of reaching the speeds it once could, this may be a sign that your turbo is failing.
A smoking exhaust - If the turbo housing has cracked, or the internal seals have blown, oil will start to leak into your exhaust system. As this burns off, it produces a distinctive blue/grey smoke, which will probably become more apparent as the engine revs increase just following an idle situation.
A loud whining noise - Often, a failing turbocharger will make a loud, distinctive noise when under boost - a bit like a dentist's drill or police siren if compressor wheel damaged. If you start to hear this noise from your engine, it's definitely time to have it checked out!
The next steps - checking your turbo If you notice any of the warning signs, then get your turbo checked as soon as possible. Your turbocharger isn't going to repair itself, and the longer you leave it, the worse (and more expensive) the problem will get!
At AET, we're always happy to help with the cost-effective diagnosis and repairs on a full range of turbochargers. Alternatively, if you're mechanically minded and aren't afraid of looking under the bonnet, you can check for a range of faults yourself by inspecting the turbo.
Essentially, you are looking for signs of oil, excessive movement, impact damage and contact between the compressor wheel and housing.
Before you start the process, we recommend checking the air filter, exhaust system, breather system and fuel system on your vehicle are all working properly, as these can cause similar symptoms to turbo failure.
Once you've done that, you'll need to remove the air filter to gain access to the turbo. First, examine the exterior, checking for any signs of oil or loose connections.
Then, check the compressor wheel - it should be clean, without any dings, chips, or signs corrosive pitting. Look out for evidence of excessive movement, ensuring that the wheel can't touch the housing, and check to see whether the turbocharger is able to rotate freely.
I you are feeling particularly ambitious; you can also check the exhaust side of the turbo. First, remove the exhaust pipe all the way to the turbo, so you can see the turbine wheel. This should look clean, with no carbon build up, scale or oil along the surface, and the blades should be free from cracks, wear and damage.

I’m happy to assist further over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/uttamjeet_2f3adc18600f8ede

Jan 13, 2018 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Elantra 2004(Diesel, done 136,000km) Leak in Turbo Charger


A turbocharger can leak. Some of the gaskets might be shot and need to be replaced or a hose might need to be replaced. If the turbocharger itself is leaking and not a gasket then the turbo housing is probably cracked. If you get the turbocharger replaced it should last a good 20 years or so. The only thing that usually wears out on turbochargers are gaskets and thrust bearings.

Mar 24, 2012 | 2004 Hyundai Elantra

1 Answer

There is white smoke coming out of the back of my 2005 aui a4 2.0 tdi


It's very simply to find out if the turbocharger is causing white smoke from the exhaust vs a blown head gasket. So, remove the turbocharger's compressor inlet centre hose (from the aluminium side of the turbo). Then see if there's in plenty of oil coming out from the hose and from the turbo. I'm 100% convinced that the turbocharger is damaged in your case. You can remove also the exhaust pipe out from the turbocharger, and see if there's a lot of oil coming out.
Repair or replace bad turbocharger with a new one (or with a second hand in good condition one).
Good Luck!

Oct 01, 2011 | 2005 Audi A4

1 Answer

How to recognize if my turbo is causing blue smoke from the exhaust vs a blown head gasket. I don't have anti freeze mixed with my oil but it smoke coming out the exhaust when the car is running. ...


It's very simply to find out if the turbocharger is causing blue smoke from the exhaust vs a blown head gasket. So, remove the turbocharger's compressor inlet centre hose (from the aluminium side of the turbo). Then see if there's in plenty of oil coming out from the hose and from the turbo. I'm 100% convinced that the turbocharger is damaged in your case. You can remove also the exhaust pipe out from the turbocharger, and see if there's a lot of oil coming out.
Repair or replace bad turbocharger with a new one (or with a second hand in good condition one). Good Luck!

Sep 27, 2011 | 2002 Volkswagen Jetta TDI

2 Answers

I want to check and top up the oil in the turbo charger. Where is it located?


The turbocharger is normally lubricated by the engine oil. That is why it is imperative to do oil changes on turbo engine at 3000 miles rather than the recommended 6000 for normal engines, and that you use a good quality oil without adding any extra additives. There are oils marked for turbo engines, but make sure it is one backed and marketed by a reputable oil/petroleum company.

Apr 06, 2011 | 1993 Toyota 4Runner

1 Answer

What causes turbochargers to leak oil


There are seals and bearing inside the turbo. Since the turbo operates at high speeds and are exposed to heat, those parts tend to wear out and begin to leak oil.

Oct 18, 2010 | 1984 Toyota Corolla

1 Answer

Need to remove the turbocharger from truck to replace oil cooler. Am unable to get it out. It is a 2003 ford 250 superduty tubo diesel 6.0 litre


1 - Remove the turbocharger intake tube
2 - Disconnect the charge air cooler inlet pipe
3 - Remove the push pins on turbo cowl
4 - Disconnect the turbo VGT solenoid
5 - Remove the oil supply tube
6 - Using the special tool, remove the oil feed tube
7 - Remove clamp from the turbo down pipe
8 - Remove the clamp from the turbo inlet
9 - Loosen the exhaust inlet pipe-to-EGR cooler clamp
10 - Loosen the RH & LH exhaust inlet pipe-to-exhaust manifold nuts
11 - Remove the rear turbocharger mounting bolt
12 - Remove the front mounting bolts
13 - Position the turbocharger and remove the turbocharger drain tube
14 - Remove the turbocharger

If you cant do it with these instructions put down your wrench and take to a dealership for a professional to work on it

Sep 03, 2010 | 2003 Ford F250 Super Duty Crew Cab

4 Answers

Nissan Navara STR 2006 d22 3lt turbo. Turbo is whistling very


Remember, what is heard as turbocharger noise may not be caused by a noisy turbocharger. Before replacing a turbocharger perform the following diagnosis.
A. If a loud whine or whistle is heard during acceleration and increases or decreases with rpm and load. This condition is most often the result of a loose clamp/hose at the turbocharger compressor outlet, charge air cooler inlet, outlet or at the intake manifold.

1. With the engine running at idle and the transmission in Park or Neutral with the parking brake set, feel for boost air escaping at each connection between the turbocharger compressor outlet and intake manifold. For limited access areas, spray soapy water on those connectors and look for bubbles.

2. Check the exhaust manifold and exhaust system for leaks.

I hope this helped.

Thank you,
Norse

May 16, 2010 | 2005 Nissan King Cab

1 Answer

I have black smoke when putting pressure on the engine anfd there is no power, checked vgt, ok turbo sounds ok but get a burning smell of oil in cab, but no leaks on valve covers etc 6.0 engine


check the air cleaner if it is plugged up it will cause the engine to run rich. check the EGR valve if it is coked up with carbon this will cause smoking under load this is a common problem. double check your turbo for excessive oil on the intake and exhaust sides note it is normal for the turbine to have slight play it rides on cushion of oil while running. also check with you local dealer for computer updates there is a re-flash for the earlier 6.0s with fueling issues.

Jul 09, 2009 | 2004 Ford F350

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