Question about 2005 Honda Pilot

1 Answer

Trying to identify the signal wire color code and location at the pcm for the 5 wire O2 sensors both front and rear. Are they on connector A, B, or C at the pcm. There are actually 2 signals coming from each (B1,S1 & B2,S1). What are each used for - in the 5 wire sensor?

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Honda Master
  • 14,092 Answers

YOU HAVE TO GO ON LINE LOOK UP AUTO DATA DIY FOR A ELECTRICAL SCHEMATIC FOR THE ENGINE CONTROL SYSTEM ON A 2005 HONDA PILOT OR BUY A HAYNES REPAIR MANUAL AT ANY AUTO PARTS STORES.THE REPAIR MANUAL HAS ELECTRICAL SCHEMATIC FOR ENGINE CONTROLS.

Posted on Oct 24, 2010

  • jorock514 Oct 24, 2010

    Bought the Haynes Manual today from AutoZone - it is worthless...but thanks for your input...will keep searching.

  • Jonah Oneal Oct 24, 2010

    YOU CAN TAKE IT BACK WITH A RECEIPT JUST TELL THE STORE WHERE YOU PURCHASED MANUAL AT DONT HAVE THE DIAGRAM YOU NEED YOU CANT USE IT.TRY GO ON LINE LOOK FOR A FACTORY MANUAL.SORRY DIDNT WORK OUT.

×

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE:

Hi there,
Save hours of searching online or wasting money on unnecessary repairs by talking to a 6YA Expert who can help you resolve this issue over the phone in a minute or two.

Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.

Here's a link to this great service

Good luck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Code po157


02 sensor circuit low voltage ---answer is copied from obd-codes .com you can visit this site for more information if necessary Usually rear o2 sensor problems won't cause drivability issues since they are an input that measures catalyst efficiency (unlike front o2 sensors). However if you have other codes present, like lean codes or pre-o2 sensor codes, then they may cause drivability problems as well as P0143. The following symptoms may be present: MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination Engine performance issues Engine running rough Engine running rich (only if PCM is trying to add fuel to compensate for low o2 sensor voltage reading) Engine running lean (only if vacuum leak is large enough that PCM can't compensate by adding fuel) Poor idle Causes If you have reason to believe that your engine is running lean, fix that problem first, then clear codes and see if the P0157 code resets. An engine that is running lean could set this code, but usually there will be lean codes (P0171, P0174) present. The following could be causes: Air leaks in exhaust in front of o2 sensor giving false reading Engine running excessively lean O2 sensor connector damaged/corroded O2 sensor signal circuit is shorted to ground O2 sensor ground circuit is open O2 sensor has failed (it may be contaminated with fuel or coolant) PCM has failed

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0157
Copyright © OBD-Codes.com

Oct 02, 2013 | 2001 GMC Jimmy

1 Answer

1995 dodge ram 1500 318 motor it wont get fire where is the logic module located


Under hood,passenger side mounted on the firewall,but ...
Could be something else ,crank sensor or cam,or ign.rotor ect.
The module like 3 hundred bucks.Try this ,turn the key
on-off-on-off-on( without out hitting the starter) the check
engine light should begin to flash.
Here is a code list,may narrow down the problem.
Diagnostic Trouble Code Descriptions and service hints. Fault Code DRB Display Code Description. Service hints. 11 No Crank reference signal at PCM No Distributor reference signal detected during engine cranking. Check the circuit between the distributor and PCM. 12 Battery Disconnect Direct Battery input to PCM disconnected within last 50 ignition key-on cycles. Normal if battery has been disconnected, otherwise check battery power and ground connections. 13** No change in MAP from start to run No difference seen between the engine MAP reading and the barometric (atmospheric) pressure reading at startup. Indicates a problem with the MAP sensor vacuum system. 14** MAP sensor voltage too low or too high MAP sensor voltage output is outside the acceptable range. 15** No Vehicle speed sensor signal No signal received from the vehicle speed sensor during road load operation. 17* Engine is cold too long Engine temperature too high or too low while traveling. Check coolant level, radiator cap, temperature sensor, and thermostat. 21** O2S Stays at center O2S shorted to voltage O2 sensor does not detect rich or lean condition, or O2 sensor input voltage too high. DRB will indicate which side with dual sensors. The O2 sensor signal should fluctuate under normal conditions. 22** ECT sensor voltage too high or too low Engine Coolant temperature sensor input out of normal range. Check engine temperature sensor. 23** Intake air temp sensor voltage too high or low Intake air manifold temperature sensor is out of range. Check sensor. 24** Throttle position sensor voltage too high or low TPS sensor is out of normal range. 25** Idle air control motor circuits A short is detected in one or more of the idle air motor circuits. 27* Injector # control circuit Injector number # output driver circuit does not respond to the control signal. Check the affected circuit. 31** EVAP Solenoid Circuit Short or open in the EVAP solenoid circuit. Check for loose, broken, or shorted wire in the charcoal canister purge solenoid wiring and connectors. 32** EGR Solenoid circuit Short or open in the EGR solenoid circuit. Check for loose, broken, or shorted wire in the EGR valve wiring and connectors. Possible air fuel ratio imbalance not detected during diagnosis. 33* AC clutch relay circuit Short or open in the AC clutch circuit. 34* Speed control circuit or speed control switch always low or high An open or short in the speed control vacuum or vent circuits. Speed control switch input above or below normal range. 35 Radiator Fan low speed relay circuit Open or short in the radiator fan relay wiring. 37** Torque converter clutch solenoid CKT or Trans temp sensor too high or low Open or short in CKT wiring or connectors. Voltage out of range at transmission temperature sensor input. See NOTE #1 below 41** Generator field not switching properly Open or short in the generator (alternator) field control (regulator) circuit. This indicates a problem with the charging circuit and the fault is set when the battery voltage from the ASD relay falls below 11.75 volts. Wiring, connectors, fuses, and the ASD relay should be checked. A shorted battery cell can also trigger this fault. 42* Auto shutdown relay circuit Open or short in the ASD relay wiring or connectors. 43** Ignition coil circuit # Open or short in number # coil circuit. Indicates that the ignition coil's peak primary circuit current is not achieved with the maximum dwell time. 44* Battery temp sensor volts out of range An open or short in the engine coolant temperature sensor circuit or a problem in the PCM's battery temperature circuit. 45* Trans OD solenoid circuit Transmission OD solenoid circuit failure. Open or short in the transmission overdrive solenoid circuit. 46** Charging system voltage too high Battery voltage sense input above target charging voltage during engine operation. Computer is indicating that the battery voltage is not being regulated. 47** Charging system voltage too low Battery voltage sense input above target charging voltage during engine operation. Also, no significant change in battery voltage was detected during a test of the generator output. 51** System lean L-Idle Adap at rich limit or lean R-Idle Adap at rich limit O2 sensor signal indicates lean air/fuel ratio during engine operation. The computer ran the mixture to the rich limit of programming, but the O2 sensor still indicated a lean condition. L or R indicate left or right side O2 sensor. Fuel pressure problems can lean the mixture and set this fault. 52** System rich L-Idle Adap at lean limit or rich R-Idle Adap at lean limit O2 sensor signal indicates rich air/fuel ratio during engine operation. The computer ran the mixture to the lean limit of programming, but the O2 sensor still indicated a rich condition. L or R indicate left or right side O2 sensor. Faulty ignition components, high or low fuel pressure, or leaking injectors can set this fault. 53* Internal PCM failure or PCM SPI comm failure An internal PCM failure or PCM communications failure has been detected. 54* No cam sync signal at PCM No fuel sync (camshaft signal) detected during engine crank. No camshaft position sensor signal was received from the distributor. Problem with the distributor synchronization circuit. 55 N/A End of message code. A DTC 55 is used to end all DTC messages. This code does not show on the DRB tool and indicates a completion of the stored codes on the Malfunction Indicator Lamp (check engine lamp). 62* PCM failure SRI miles not stored Unsuccessful attempt to update Service Reminder Indicator miles in the PCM EEPROM (memory). 63* PCM Failure EEPROM write denied Unsuccessful attempt to write and EEPROM location by the PCM. Controller failure, check the PCM. This code can be set when attempting an unauthorized reprogram of the PCM. 71** Aux 5V signal voltage low The auxiliary 5 volt supply output voltage is low. The 5 volt output signal is not reaching the required voltage level. 72** Catalytic Converter efficiency failure The catalytic converter is not converting emissions in the proper ratio.

Feb 22, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Pontiac grand am gt 2001 with code 140


Hi there:DTC P0140 - 02 Sensor Circuit No Activity Detected (Bank 1 Sensor 2)



The Powertrain control module (PCM) will provide a .45 volt reference voltage to the Oxygen sensor. When the O2 sensor reaches operating temperature, it will generate a voltage that will vary depending on the oxygen content of the exhaust. Lean exhaust generates a low voltage (less than .45V) and rich exhaust generates a high voltage (greater than .45V). O2 sensors on a specific bank marked as "sensor 2" (as this one is) are used to monitor emissions. A Three-Way Catalyst (TWC) system (catalytic converter) is used to control tailpipe emissions. The PCM uses the signal received from Oxygen sensor 2 (#2 indicates aft of catalytic converter, #1 indicates pre-converter) to read efficiency of TWC. Normally this sensor will switch between high and low voltage at a noticeably slower rate than the front sensor. This is normal. If the signal received from rear (#2) O2 sensor indicates that the voltage has "stuck" between .425V to .474 V, the PCM determines this sensor is inactive and this code will set.


Your check engine light(CEL), or malfuction indicator lamp (MIL) will be illuminated. There will not likely be any noticeable drivability problems other than the MIL. The reason is this: The rear or post catalytic converter Oxygen sensor does not affect fuel deliver(this is an exception on Chryslers). It only MONITORS the efficiency of the catalytic converter. For this reason, you will likely not notice any engine trouble.



The causes for a P0140 code are fairly few. They could be any of the following:
Shorted heater circuit in O2 sensor. (Usually requires replacement of heater circuit fuse in fuse block also)
Shorted signal circuit in O2 sensor
Melting of harness connector or wiring due to contact with exhaust system
Water intrusion in harness connector or PCM connector
Bad PCM


Possible Solutions: This is a fairly specific problem and shouldn't be too difficult to diagnose.


First, start engine and warm up. Using a scan tool, watch the Bank 1, sensor 2, o2 sensor voltage. Normally the voltage should switch slowly above and below .45 volts. If it does, the problem is likely intermittent. You'll have to wait for the problem to surface before you can accurately diagnose.


However, if it doesn't switch, or is stuck then perform the following: 2. Shut off vehicle. Visually check the Bank1,2 harness connector for melting or chafing of the harness or the connector. Repair or replace as needed 3. Turn ignition on, but engine off. Disconnect the O2 sensor connector and check for 12Volts at the Heater Circuit supply and for proper ground on the heater circuit ground circuit. a. If 12V heater supply is missing, check the proper fuses for an open in the circuit. If heater circuit fuse is blown, then suspect a bad heater in the o2 sensor causing a blown heater circuit fuse. Replace sensor and fuse and recheck. b. If ground is missing, trace the circuit and clean or repair ground circuit. 4. Next, with connector still unplugged, check for 5 Volts on the reference circuit. If this is missing, check for 5 Volts at the PCM connector. If 5 Volts is present at the PCM connector but not at the o2 sensor harness connector, then there is an open or short in the reference wire supply between the PCM and the o2 sensor connector. However, if there is no 5 Volts present at the PCM connector, the PCM is likely at fault due to internal short. Replace PCM. ** (NOTE: on Chrysler models, a common problem is the 5Volt reference circuit can be shorted out by any sensor on the car that uses a 5 Volt reference. Simply unplug each sensor one at a time until the 5 Volts reappears. The last sensor you unplugged is the shorted sensor. Replacing it should fix the 5 Volt reference short.) 5. If all the voltages and grounds are present, then replace the Bank 1,2 O2 sensor and re-test.


Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Jun 28, 2012 | 1999 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

3 Answers

1997 plymouth voyager w/ codes: P0140 O2 sensor circuit no activity detected (bank 1(2) sensor 2


The Powertrain control module (PCM) will provide a .45 volt reference voltage to the Oxygen sensor. When the O2 sensor reaches operating temperature, it will generate a voltage that will vary depending on the oxygen content of the exhaust. Lean exhaust generates a low voltage (less than .45V) and rich exhaust generates a high voltage (greater than .45V). O2 sensors on a specific bank marked as "sensor 2" (as this one is) are used to monitor emissions. A Three-Way Catalyst (TWC) system (catalytic converter) is used to control tailpipe emissions. The PCM uses the signal received from Oxygen sensor 2 (#2 indicates aft of catalytic converter, #1 indicates pre-converter) to read efficiency of TWC. Normally this sensor will switch between high and low voltage at a noticeably slower rate than the front sensor. This is normal. If the signal received from rear (#2) O2 sensor indicates that the voltage has "stuck" between .425V to .474 V, the PCM determines this sensor is inactive and this code will set.
Potential Symptoms Your check engine light(CEL), or malfuction indicator lamp (MIL) will be illuminated. There will not likely be any noticeable drivability problems other than the MIL. The reason is this: The rear or post catalytic converter Oxygen sensor does not affect fuel deliver(this is an exception on Chryslers). It only MONITORS the efficiency of the catalytic converter. For this reason, you will likely not notice any engine trouble.
Causes The causes for a P0140 code are fairly few. They could be any of the following:
  • Shorted heater circuit in O2 sensor. (Usually requires replacement of heater circuit fuse in fuse block also)
  • Shorted signal circuit in O2 sensor
  • Melting of harness connector or wiring due to contact with exhaust system
  • Water intrusion in harness connector or PCM connector
  • Bad PCM
Possible Solutions This is a fairly specific problem and shouldn't be too difficult to diagnose.
First, start engine and warm up. Using a scan tool, watch the Bank 1, sensor 2, o2 sensor voltage. Normally the voltage should switch slowly above and below .45 volts. If it does, the problem is likely intermittent. You'll have to wait for the problem to surface before you can accurately diagnose.
However, if it doesn't switch, or is stuck then perform the following: 2. Shut off vehicle. Visually check the Bank1,2 harness connector for melting or chafing of the harness or the connector. Repair or replace as needed 3. Turn ignition on, but engine off. Disconnect the O2 sensor connector and check for 12Volts at the Heater Circuit supply and for proper ground on the heater circuit ground circuit. a. If 12V heater supply is missing, check the proper fuses for an open in the circuit. If heater circuit fuse is blown, then suspect a bad heater in the o2 sensor causing a blown heater circuit fuse. Replace sensor and fuse and recheck. b. If ground is missing, trace the circuit and clean or repair ground circuit. 4. Next, with connector still unplugged, check for 5 Volts on the reference circuit. If this is missing, check for 5 Volts at the PCM connector. If 5 Volts is present at the PCM connector but not at the o2 sensor harness connector, then there is an open or short in the reference wire supply between the PCM and the o2 sensor connector. However, if there is no 5 Volts present at the PCM connector, the PCM is likely at fault due to internal short. Replace PCM. ** (NOTE: on Chrysler models, a common problem is the 5Volt reference circuit can be shorted out by any sensor on the car that uses a 5 Volt reference. Simply unplug each sensor one at a time until the 5 Volts reappears. The last sensor you unplugged is the shorted sensor. Replacing it should fix the 5 Volt reference short.) 5. If all the voltages and grounds are present, then replace the Bank 1,2 O2 sensor and re-test.

May 26, 2011 | Plymouth Voyager Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Hi-Failed inspection at Motor Vehicle Code PO160 (2001 Nissan Maxima). Car runs fine- no dash lights on. Left Rear Oxygen Sensor? Cost to fix or rigg it? Must get this car passed. Thanks in advance,...


CausesPotential causes of an P0160 code include:
  • Holes in exhaust near post cat o2 sensor
  • Bad Bank 2, position 2, o2 sensor
  • Wiring problem, melted harness, broken connectors, etc.
  • Bad PCM
Possible SolutionsIt's always best to do a visual inspection of the exhaust system first. Look for holes near o2 sensors or wiring harnesses coming in contact with exhaust components. Repair as necessary.
1. Start the engine and allow it to reach operating temperature. Using a scan tool, observe the Bank 2 position 2 o2 sensor. If it isn't moving at all this doesn't necessarily mean that anythings wrong. Post cat o2 sensors often switch very little. Increase the engine RPM to a fast idle and then recheck the sensor voltage reading. If it starts switching now, the sensor may be sluggish and/or intermittently going "dormant". Replacing the sensor at this point would be a good idea. Visually check the o2 sensor for contaminates, etc. If you suspect it's contaminated with coolant or oil, replace it. But, if it still isn't responding after increasing engine RPM, turn off the engine and unplug the 2/2 o2 sensor. With KOEO (key on engine off) check that there is 12 Volts battery voltage and a good ground to the o2 sensor heater element. If the heater element has no battery voltage it can cause the o2 sensor to be sluggish and not switch properly which can cause a P0160.
So, diagnose that problem first(there will usually be other codes present). If there is power and ground to the heater element check that the sensor ground is present. If it is, connect a jumper wire between the sensor ground and signal wire. Now the 2/2 o2 sensor reading should be low. If so, replace the Bank 2 position 2 o2 sensor. If, after connecting the jumper wire, the o2 sensor reading still remains "stuck", check for wiring problems, harness contacting exhaust components, or broken connectors. Repair as necessary. Then recheck. If you can find no wiring problems and the o2 sensor reading on the scan tool doesn't change after installing the jumper wire, recheck at the PCM connector. It may be necessary to clip the signal wire near the PCM in a location that will be easy to repair. If it now shows a low voltage reading, then you know beyond a doubt that there is a wiring problem. At this point clipping the offending wire out of the harness and running a new one may be your best bet. But If it still shows no change, the PCM may be at fault.

May 14, 2011 | Nissan Maxima Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I have a dodge ram 2500 5.9 cummins showing a code of p0140. What's this code


From this website:

http://www.obd-codes.com/p0140

P0140 - 02 Sensor Circuit No Activity Detected (Bank 1 Sensor 2)

What does that mean?

The Powertrain control module (PCM) will provide a .45 volt reference voltage to the Oxygen sensor. When the O2 sensor reaches operating temperature, it will generate a voltage that will vary depending on the oxygen content of the exhaust. Lean exhaust generates a low voltage (less than .45V) and rich exhaust generates a high voltage (greater than .45V). O2 sensors on a specific bank marked as "sensor 2" (as this one is) are used to monitor emissions. A Three-Way Catalyst (TWC) system (catalytic converter) is used to control tailpipe emissions. The PCM uses the signal received from Oxygen sensor 2 (#2 indicates aft of catalytic converter, #1 indicates pre-converter) to read efficiency of TWC. Normally this sensor will switch between high and low voltage at a noticeably slower rate than the front sensor. This is normal. If the signal received from rear (#2) O2 sensor indicates that the voltage has "stuck" between .425V to .474 V, the PCM determines this sensor is inactive and this code will set.

Potential Symptoms

Your check engine light(CEL), or malfuction indicator lamp (MIL) will be illuminated. There will not likely be any noticeable drivability problems other than the MIL. The reason is this: The rear or post catalytic converter Oxygen sensor does not affect fuel deliver(this is an exception on Chryslers). It only MONITORS the efficiency of the catalytic converter. For this reason, you will likely not notice any engine trouble.

Causes

The causes for a P0140 code are fairly few. They could be any of the following:

Shorted heater circuit in O2 sensor. (Usually requires replacement of heater circuit fuse in fuse block also)

Shorted signal circuit in O2 sensor

Melting of harness connector or wiring due to contact with exhaust system

Water intrusion in harness connector or PCM connector

Bad PCM

Possible Solutions

This is a fairly specific problem and shouldn't be too difficult to diagnose.

First, start engine and warm up. Using a scan tool, watch the Bank 1, sensor 2, o2 sensor voltage. Normally the voltage should switch slowly above and below .45 volts. If it does, the problem is likely intermittent. You'll have to wait for the problem to surface before you can accurately diagnose.

However, if it doesn

Apr 15, 2011 | Dodge Pickup Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

0140 0141 and 0039 code


P0140 - 02 Sensor Circuit No Activity Detected (Bank 1 Sensor 2)
The Powertrain control module (PCM) will provide a .45 volt reference voltage to the Oxygen sensor. When the O2 sensor reaches operating temperature, it will generate a voltage that will vary depending on the oxygen content of the exhaust. Lean exhaust generates a low voltage (less than .45V) and rich exhaust generates a high voltage (greater than .45V). O2 sensors on a specific bank marked as "sensor 2" (as this one is) are used to monitor emissions. A Three-Way Catalyst (TWC) system (catalytic converter) is used to control tailpipe emissions. The PCM uses the signal received from Oxygen sensor 2 (#2 indicates aft of catalytic converter, #1 indicates pre-converter) to read efficiency of TWC. Normally this sensor will switch between high and low voltage at a noticeably slower rate than the front sensor. This is normal. If the signal received from rear (#2) O2 sensor indicates that the voltage has "stuck" between .425V to .474 V, the PCM determines this sensor is inactive and this code will set.

Potential Symptoms: Your check engine light(CEL), or malfuction indicator lamp (MIL) will be illuminated. There will not likely be any noticeable drivability problems other than the MIL. The reason is this: The rear or post catalytic converter Oxygen sensor does not affect fuel deliver(this is an exception on Chryslers). It only MONITORS the efficiency of the catalytic converter. For this reason, you will likely not notice any engine trouble.

Causes: The causes for a P0140 code are fairly few. They could be any of the following:
* Shorted heater circuit in O2 sensor. (Usually requires replacement of heater circuit fuse in fuse block also)
* Shorted signal circuit in O2 sensor
* Melting of harness connector or wiring due to contact with exhaust system
* Water intrusion in harness connector or PCM connector
* Bad PCM

Possible Solutions: This is a fairly specific problem and shouldn't be too difficult to diagnose.
First, start engine and warm up. Using a scan tool, watch the Bank 1, sensor 2, o2 sensor voltage. Normally the voltage should switch slowly above and below .45 volts. If it does, the problem is likely intermittent. You'll have to wait for the problem to surface before you can accurately diagnose.

However, if it doesn't switch, or is stuck then perform the following: 2. Shut off vehicle. Visually check the Bank1,2 harness connector for melting or chafing of the harness or the connector. Repair or replace as needed 3. Turn ignition on, but engine off. Disconnect the O2 sensor connector and check for 12Volts at the Heater Circuit supply and for proper ground on the heater circuit ground circuit. a. If 12V heater supply is missing, check the proper fuses for an open in the circuit. If heater circuit fuse is blown, then suspect a bad heater in the o2 sensor causing a blown heater circuit fuse. Replace sensor and fuse and recheck. b. If ground is missing, trace the circuit and clean or repair ground circuit. 4. Next, with connector still unplugged, check for 5 Volts on the reference circuit. If this is missing, check for 5 Volts at the PCM connector. If 5 Volts is present at the PCM connector but not at the o2 sensor harness connector, then there is an open or short in the reference wire supply between the PCM and the o2 sensor connector. However, if there is no 5 Volts present at the PCM connector, the PCM is likely at fault due to internal short. Replace PCM.

** (NOTE: on Chrysler models, a common problem is the 5Volt reference circuit can be shorted out by any sensor on the car that uses a 5 Volt reference. Simply unplug each sensor one at a time until the 5 Volts reappears. The last sensor you unplugged is the shorted sensor. Replacing it should fix the 5 Volt reference short.) 5. If all the voltages and grounds are present, then replace the Bank 1,2 O2 sensor and re-test.


P0141 - O2 Sensor Heater Circuit Malfunction (Bank 1, Sensor 2)
This code means that the heated circuit in the oxygen sensor on bank 1 decreases time needed to enter closed loop. As the O2 heater reaches operating temperature, the oxygen sensor responds by switching according to oxygen content of the exhaust surrounding it. The ECM tracks how long it takes for the oxygen sensor to begin switching. It the ECM determines (based on coolant temp) that too much time elapsed before the oxygen sensor began operating properly, it will set P0141. See also: P0135 (Bank 1, Sensor 1).

Symptoms: You will likely notice poor fuel economy the illumination of the Check Engine Light.

Causes: A code P0141 may mean that one or more of the following has happened:
* open or short to ground in the wiring harness
* O2 heater circuit wiring high resistance
* O2 heater element resistance is high
* Internal short or open in the heater element

Note: Typically a failed catalytic converter does not cause this code. You're more likely to see a P0420 code for a failed converter.
Possible Solutions

* Replace oxygen sensor (cannot repair open or short that occurs internally to sensor)
* Repair short or open or high resistance in wiring harness or harness connectors



P0339 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Intermittent
The Crankshaft position sensor also known as the crank position sensor is an electronic device used in an engine to record the rate at which the crankshaft is spinning. This information is used by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) or Electronic Control Module(ECM) to control ignition and fuel injection. The sensor system consists of a rotating part, typically a disc, as well as a static part, the actual sensor.

When the engine is running, the high and low parts of the teeth cause the gap with the sensor to change. The changing gap causes the magnetic field near the sensor to change. The change in the magnetic field cause the voltage from the sensor to change.

- The crankshaft position sensor (POS) signal sent to the ECM is intermittent
- The proper pulse signal from the crankshaft position sensor (POS) is not sent to Tech notes
- Sometimes and in some models, low battery voltage or a weak starter can can trigger a Crankshaft Position Sensor code.

Symptoms:
- Engine Light ON (or Service Engine Soon Warning Light)
- Lack/Loss of Power
- Engine Stall

Possible causes:
- Harness or connectors (The sensor circuit is open or shorted)
- Crankshaft position sensor may be faulty
- Signal plate may be damage
- Starter motor may be faulty
- Starting system circuit
- Dead (Weak) battery

Possible solution:
- Charge battery
- Repair harness or connector
- Replaced Crankshaft Position Sensor.



I hope this helps to solve it (remember to rate this answer).

Jan 18, 2011 | Porsche 911 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Check Engine light code P0432


P0432 - Main Catalyst Efficiency Below Threshold Bank 2
The ECM or PCM monitors the front an rear O2 sensors. The ECM or PCM detects Warm up Catalytic Converter when the sensors are out of specifications.

DTC is set when the ECM or PCM detects rear HO2S value difference becomes closer to value of front HO2S. The ECM or PCM monitors when vehicle speed is 25-60 MPH, load is 22-45 percent and engine speed is 1000-3000 RPM.

Symptoms
- Engine Light ON (or Service Engine Soon Warning Light)

Possible causes
- Warm Up Three Way Catalytic converter deterioration or malfunction. - Exhaust system leaks. - Loose front or rear HO2Ss. - Front HO2S malfunction. - O2 sensors harness or connectors

Possible solution
- Replaced Catalytic Converter - Replaced rear O2 sensor - Repair wire harness or connectors

Check it ans tell us news.

Jan 16, 2011 | 1999 Dodge Intrepid

1 Answer

I have a 1998 chevy malibu what wire for the o2 sensor is the signal wire and theres four to choose from


On the front O2 Sensor, the signal wire s Purple. On the rear O2 Sensor, the signal wire is Purple and White. (You will probably have to look at the wire colors on the main harness side of the O2 Sensor connector, not on the sensor itself.)

Nov 19, 2009 | 1998 Chevrolet Malibu

1 Answer

Trouble codes


Trouble Code: P0139
O2 (B1 S2) Slow Response
Trouble Code Conditions:Engine started; vehicle driven at 20-55 mph with the throttle open for 2 minutes; ECT at more than 158ºF (70C); catalytic converter temperature is more than 1112F (600C); and EVAP purge is active. O2 Sensor signal voltage switches less than 16 times from lean to rich within 20 seconds during monitoring, or will compare the state of change between the front and rear O2 Sensors and if the differences are greater than a calibrated amount, the DTC will set. 3 good trips are required to turn off the MIL.
Possible Causes:
  • Exhaust leak
  • O2 element is contaminated, deteriorated or it has failed
  • O2 signal circuit or return circuit has failed

Trouble Code: P0344
Camshaft Position Sensor Circuit Intermittent
Trouble Code Conditions:Engine cranking or running; system voltage over 10.5v. The PCM detected an intermittent loss of the CMP Sensor signal during the period of 2.5 complete engine revolutions. The failure counter must reach 20 before this code matures and a code is set.
Possible Causes:
  • Wiring harness fault
  • 5v supply circuit open or shorted to ground
  • Tone wheel/pulse ring is damaged or corroded
  • CMP Sensor has failed
  • CMP Sensor signal circuit is open, shorted to ground or battery voltage or 5v supply
  • CMP Sensor ground circuit is open
  • PCM has failed
  • Trouble Code: P0340
    No Camshaft Position Sensor Circuit Failure
    Trouble Code Conditions:Engine cranking or running, system voltage over 10v. The PCM detected CKP pulses without detecting any CMP Sensor pulses for 5 seconds or 2.5 engine revolutions.
    Possible Causes:
  • CMP Sensor connector is damaged, open or it is shorted
  • CMP Sensor signal circuit is open or shorted to ground or to battery voltage or 5v supply circuit
  • CMP Sensor 5v supply circuit is open or shorted to ground or to battery voltage
  • CMP Sensor ground circuit is open
  • CMP Sensor is damaged or has failed
  • CKP Sensor is damaged or has failed
  • PCM has failed
Good luck....

Nov 05, 2008 | 2005 Chrysler PT Cruiser

Not finding what you are looking for?
2005 Honda Pilot Logo

248 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Honda Experts

Marvin
Marvin

Level 3 Expert

85206 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22484 Answers

Jonah Oneal

Level 3 Expert

14092 Answers

Are you a Honda Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...