Question about 2003 Chevrolet Tracker

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Having a p0335 engine code, resurch sugests checking crank sensor resistence, need to know what the normal resistence range is for a 2003 chevy tracker with 2.0L engine with A/T

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 98 Answers

SOURCE: how do i change spark plugs on a 2003 chevy tracker?

I don't know if your vehicle is a 4 cylinder or 6 cylinder. This will make a difference in the # of cylinders as well as the placement. If it is the 4 c ylinder when you open the hood it says at Autozone.com that the spark plugs are on the front of the motor lined up 1-4. If it is the 6 cylinder then you will have 3 at the front of the motor and 3 at the back of the motor. Regardless it is the same concept. I don't know for this particular vehicle, but it is possible you may have to remove a large plastic engine covering in order to access the spark plugs. What I recommend is to replace the spark plug wires at the same time as the plugs. For all my vehicles I use NGK plugs and NAPA auto parts has the best plug wires I have used - Belden Maxx. Prior to starting you will want to check the "GAP" on each new spark plug. Using a spark plug gap tool available at parts places for about $1. Take the new plug and the non-porcelin end (the end that has the arc) insert the arc into the gap tool at the lowest end and slide the plug around until you reach the corresponding "GAP". For this vehicle it should be .44" (I checked on Autozone's website but you may want to check to be sure. At some of the part's places they may tell you that you don't have to check the gap, but believe me you alway's should. I just did a car where they insisted that I didn't need to check the gap and each plug was not gapped properly. The Arc on the plug has to be specific for your vehicle or you will have too much spark or not enough. After gapping the new plugs you are ready to start. Somewhere on the side of the motor you should see either 4 or 6 wires/cables branching out to the cylinders. Starting with whichever you prefer (do only one at a time to avoid confusion) trace the wire/cable to the cylinder and where it goes to the cylinder a "boot" covers the spark plug. Twist the boot until it comes off . If you are going to replace the plug wires take that one off and match it up to your new set (They will be different lengths). You will need a ratchet and a spark plug socket (available at parts places) The spark plug socket has rubber on the inside to protect the porcelin of the spark plug, and to provide grip. You may or may not need a small extension. Place the spark plug socket over the end of the spark plug and apply pressure until the spark plug begins to loosen. You may have to apply quite a bit of pressure if they are in there tight. Once it is loosened take the old plug out, and place the new plug in the spark plug socket. Don't use the ratchet at this point, just begin to thread the plug in by hand once it is in there as much as you can get it, tighten it down with the ratchet making sure not to over-tighten. Do the other cylinders in the same manner.

Posted on Mar 04, 2009

  • 4 Answers

SOURCE: Have a 2003 Chevy Impala. Check engine light

Bank 1 is the rear O2 sensor, but experience says to change both. The front one is right behind the engine in the middle of the engine compartment. The rear O2 sensor is on the top of the exhaust pipe, just behind the catalytic converter. But the same code that shows it is the O2 sensor (which is P0420), is the same code for the catalytic converter, or a vacuum leak. Make sure if you do change the catalytic converter, ensure that the new one is OBD-2 compliant. And the vacuum leak could possibly come from the manifold gasket. Let me know what the problem was!

Posted on Mar 26, 2009

  • 84 Answers

SOURCE: Power Light 2003 Chevy Tracker

altenator problems

Posted on May 05, 2009

  • 8 Answers

SOURCE: P0335 CRANK POSITION SENSOR A CIRCUIT MALFUNTION

crank sensors are usually located in/near the distributor.

Posted on Jun 07, 2009

  • 290 Answers

SOURCE: chevy tracker 4 cyl 4wd 2003

Most major auto part chain stores have a loaner code scanner (they require you to leave your ID while you use the tool in their parking lot). There is a connector under the dash near on the drivers side that accepts the reader....check the codes and Google them for repair info or post them back here.

Posted on Jun 10, 2009

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Crank and cam sensor replaced . cars starts and run but still reads code 335 . cranksensor circuit malfunction. and idea whats the issue why this code is still coming up.?


the sensor may be good its the circuit code which means can be a wiring /connection problem not just the sensor the following link is courtesy of obd-codes.comP0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction OBD-II Trouble Code Technical Description Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction What does that mean? The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set. Symptoms NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include: Vehicle may not start (see above) Vehicle may run rough or misfire MIL illumination Causes A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by: Damaged CKP sensor connector Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway) Sensor output open Sensor output shorted to ground Sensor output shorted to voltage Failed crank sensor Broken timing belt Failed PCM Possible Solutions Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal. If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs? If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay? If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault. This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0335
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http://www.obd-codes.com/p0335

Aug 19, 2015 | 2005 Chevrolet Impala

2 Answers

2000 volvo s40 p0335 and p0336 intermittently


both codes are for crank position sensor problems. Change it.

Aug 23, 2014 | 2000 Volvo S40

1 Answer

Codes 441 and 335 on my hyundai elantra 2002


Hi there:DTC P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:Damaged CKP sensor connectorDamaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)Sensor output openSensor output shorted to groundSensor output shorted to voltageFailed crank sensorBroken timing beltFailed PCM

Possible Solutions:Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

DTC P0441 - Evaporative Emission Control System Incorrect Purge FlowThis indicates that a part of the EVAP control system is no longer fuctioning correctly. The EVAP system consists of many parts, including (but not limited to) the gas cap, fuel lines, carbon canister, purge valve, and other hoses. The (EVAP) emission control system prevents the escape of fuel vapors from a vehicle's fuel system. Fuel vapors are routed by hoses to a charcoal canister for storage. Later, when the engine is running a purge control valve opens allowing intake vacuum to siphon the fuel vapors into the engine.

EVAP emission canister purge is contolled by a valve which allows engine vacuum to pull stored fuel vapors from fuel tank into the engine to be burned, rather than be vented to atmosphere. A vacuum switch is used to detect when flow exists. If the PCM commands purge and sees that the switch is closed (indicating no detected purge flow) P0441 is set.

A code P0441 could mean one or more of the following has happened:Bad vacuum switchBroken or damaged EVAP line or canisterOpen in PCM purge command circuitOpen or short in Voltage feed circuit to Purge SolenoidFaulty purge solenoidRestriction in EVAP solenoid, line or canisterCorrosion or resistance in purge connectorBad PCM

Possible Solutions:With a P0441 OBD-II trouble code, diagnosis can be tricky at times. Here are some things to try:
Common Chrysler fix - Replace Leak Detection Pump / LDPRepair damaged EVAP lines or canisterRepair open or short in voltage feed circuit to Purge SolenoidRepair open in PCM purge command circuitReplace purge SolenoidReplace vacuum switchRepair restriction in Evap line or canister or soleniodRepair resistance in purge connectorReplace PCM

Hope this helps.

Mar 28, 2012 | Hyundai Motor 2002 Elantra

1 Answer

What problems will code po335 cause


Hi there:
DTC P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination

A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Broken timing belt
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions: using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day

Feb 23, 2012 | 2005 Chrysler 300

1 Answer

2005 CHYSLER CODE PO335 WHAT IS IT


Hi there:
DTC P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination

A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Broken timing belt
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions: using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Feb 23, 2012 | 2005 Chrysler 300

1 Answer

Trouble code p0335


Replace the crankshaft position sensor and you should be up and running like normal. Verify that there is no power or ground problem to the crankshaft sensor, the Yellow/Black wire should have battery voltage any time the key is on and the main relay is energized.Verify that the Brown/Yellow wire has a good ground. If all is good then replace.


P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

Symptoms:
NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination


A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Broken timing belt
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions:
Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.


Hope helps.

Dec 18, 2011 | 2006 Jeep Liberty

1 Answer

Hi have 2001 chevy s1o pick up have engine light on with code po335 crank sensor circuit problem had sensor and pig tail connector replaced still have same problem around 2500 rpm engine brakes up engine...


P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction

The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

Symptoms:
NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
* Vehicle may not start (see above)
* Vehicle may run rough or misfire
* MIL illumination

Causes: A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
* Damaged CKP sensor connector
* Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
* Sensor output open
* Sensor output shorted to ground
* Sensor output shorted to voltage
* Failed crank sensor
* Broken timing belt
* Failed PCM

Possible Solutions:
1. Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
2. If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
3. If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
4. If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Test it and keep us updated.

Feb 05, 2011 | 2001 Chevrolet S-10

1 Answer

I found I have code P0335 P0335 Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction My car has recently developed a problem where it doesn't start, and I hooked up a scanner and got that code. Would...


A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:

  • Damaged CKP sensor connector
  • Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
  • Sensor output open
  • Sensor output shorted to ground
  • Sensor output shorted to voltage
  • Failed crank sensor
  • Broken timing belt
  • Failed PCM
  1. Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
  2. If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
  3. If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
  4. If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

please check this maybe

Jan 12, 2011 | Infiniti QX56 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

WHat do the Check engine codes for 2004 Hyundai santa fe. P0157, P0335 and P1372 mean?


P0157 - O2 Sensor Circuit Low Voltage (Bank 2 Sensor 2)


P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction

The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start.

Symptoms may include:
* Vehicle may not start (see above)
* Vehicle may run rough or misfire
* MIL illumination

Causes: A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
* Damaged CKP sensor connector
* Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
* Sensor output open
* Sensor output shorted to ground
* Sensor output shorted to voltage
* Failed crank sensor
* Broken timing belt
* Failed PCM

Possible Solutions:
1. Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
2. If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
3. If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
4. If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.



P1372
- Segment Time Incorrect


This engine is very sensitive to overheating and will easily warp the cylinder head. On the other hand, all the performance symptoms as well as the misfire code can be caused by a faulty crank sensor.

This leaves you at a crossroads as to how to diagnose. You could replace the crank sensor and see what happens. Or you could do a compression test to get an idea of the general health of the engine.

As for the lack of heat, you may have an air pocket in the cooling system or it may not be completely repaired. If, for example, the thermostat were stuck shut causing the pressure to build and crack your radiator, you'd still have the problem that you have no coolant flow, resulting in no heat.

Unfortunately, considering the overheating, my inclination is that you're more likely to need a cylinder head than any of the minor repairs I've suggested. But the only way to find out is to check the cooling system, compression, and crank sensor.


Hope helps.

Oct 15, 2010 | 2004 Hyundai Santa Fe

1 Answer

P0335 CRANK POSITION SENSOR A CIRCUIT MALFUNTION


crank sensors are usually located in/near the distributor.

Jun 07, 2009 | 2003 Nissan Sentra

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