Question about 2001 Chevrolet Cavalier

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I bought 4 tires at the same time, just had them rotated and was told that the front tires have more traction on them now than the back and that they shouldn't of rotated them. On a 2001 Chevy Cavalier 2-dr coupe, front wheel drive, where should the most traction be and why would there be a difference in traction if bought at the same time?

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You want the tires with deeper tread on the front of the car. As you drive, being front wheel drive the front tires do all the work, the rears are just along for the ride so the drive tires will wear down twice as fast. About ever 6000 - 8000 miles, you will need to rotate the tires to keep all 4 wearing evenly

Posted on Oct 16, 2010

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Tire rotation hyundai accent


tyre rotation is from front to back on the same side of the vehicle . It is recommended by tyre shops as it is good for business ( 4 tyres instead of 2) The other down side to tyre rotation is that you do not get a good idea of wheel alignment problems to know what to fix. Next down side is that once a wear pattern has been established that pattern will continue because the tyres are radial construction
Front drive cars wear out the front tyres in 1/4 the time that it takes for back tyres and a faulty tyre will have a wear pattern that indicates wheel alignment/ driver abuse but in fact is from case construction.It is something that I have not recommended since radial tyres came into being.

Aug 24, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

Tip

Winter driving tips.


WINTER TIRES
As a mechanic and a shop owner I get to try out various types of vehicles during test drives. So we get to try out different types of tires too. We learn what works well and what doesn't.
Don't kid yourself, all season tires don't come close to a quality winter tire on ice and snow. And when you add studs to a winter tire it makes them incredibly good. I hope they allow studded tires where you drive.
All season tires work well when they can contact the road surface directly, but when isolated from the road by ice and snow they just don't work. The compound of the tire is generally harder to resist summer heat that wears tires out and with the colder temperatures they just get stiffer.
The winter tire compound is a little softer which allows a better contact patch with whatever is under it and the larger tread gaps pinch the snow to gain traction.
Another big misconception with tires is putting them on the drive wheels only.
OK, why not you ask? Well lets start with one of the most common vehicles on the road today, a family sedan, front wheel drive.
On these cars your engine and transmission is front mounted, so a good part of the weight is front biased. So that puts lots of weight on your front wheels. Weight =traction, right? So you put your winter tires on the front and your already used all seasons on the back.
Imagine now cruising down the freeway in 4 inches of fresh snow, "man these winter tires are awesome !" But you need to brake in a hurry for a deer coming out. Well those fresh winters do their job OK but the lightweight back end of your car hasn't the traction to handle the maneuver, the back end is sliding around sideways...hang on to it!!!
Well you get the picture now. You need all 4.

DONT SPIN YOUR TIRES

How many times do you see it each slippery day? You know, the drivers wheels howling for mercy as they attempt to accelerate.
Many vehicles today are equipped with traction control, there is a good reason for this accessory to your vehicle. If you can accelerate without spinning you will get moving faster than someone who is, and under more control too. A spinning tire will often create a hot spot under itself, melt the ice or snow and make it even more slippery. You even run the risk of getting yourself stuck in the rut you create.
A spinning tire also will go sideways easier, as it loses traction it also loses some direction.
Granpa said to me sometimes...slow down and go faster ...I now have seen the truth in it.

on Dec 05, 2009 | Chevrolet Impala Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Why does my 4 wheel drive not work all the time?


Elaine,

not work, do tell what makes you think it dont work (a lamp) or tires slipping or dead tires. (by tires mean that and traction)??????????

what mode fails, of the many, and where.???????



first off, we dont know what your tires are touching.

on road, or off road. pavement or ICE or snow.

that matters big time . (you read manual and match MODE to Road)

your lost operators guide explains all that, right?

eg: how and when to use, 4wd, its all there. I promise.

ControlTrac 4-wheel-drive system



here are the mode. which one , gives you problems.



quote ford with comments.



What are the modes, and how do they differ?

(note this is the operational behavior of a 2008 Ford Expedition. Newer and older Expeditions will vary only slightly)



2H 2-wheel-drive with high range gearing (1.00:1) Rear-wheel-drive capability,

2-wheel electronic traction control system is enabled



4A 4-wheel-drive Auto with high range gearing (1.00:1) Full-time all-wheel-drive capability, ((best on pavement or any time)

Electronically adjusted torque split to front & rear wheels, Electronically variable center differential,

Front driveshaft & rear primary driveshaft allowed rotational speed difference,

4-wheel electronic traction control system is enabled



4H 4-wheel-drive with high range gearing (1.00:1) Part-time 4-wheel-drive capability, (not for dry pavement EVER)

Continuous 50/50 torque split to front & rear wheels, Electronically locked center differential,

Front driveshaft & rear primary driveshaft mechanically locked with no rotational speed difference,

4-wheel electronic traction control system is enabled



4L 4-wheel-drive with low range gearing (2.64:1) Part-time 4-wheel-drive capability, (off road usage, mostly)

Continuous 50/50 torque split to front & rear wheels, Electronically locked center differential,

Front driveshaft & rear primary driveshaft mechanically locked with no rotational speed difference,

4-wheel electronic traction control system is enabled, ESC and RSC are disabled



In 4A mode the center differential is electronically-controlled and rear drive wheel bias. The on-board computer monitors for any sign of rear drive wheel slip (loss of traction)

If loss of traction is detected, the center differential is told to send a share of the engine\'s torque to the front drive wheels. It will not let the front driveshaft turn at the same speed as the rear driveshaft.



What about traction management?

1997-2002 model Ford Expeditions offered an optional limited-slip rear differential (LSD). A conventional open rear differential was standard along with the conventional open front differential and the electronic locking center differential.

comment with out LSD, one tire can spin, on say ice.

but the other 3 tires dont, in full time.

Jul 04, 2014 | 2003 Ford Expedition

1 Answer

2002 jeep wont stay in 4wheel drive low


Your JEEP is only part time 4WHEEL DRIVE as you can't DRIVE on the STREET with it, its NORMAL and nothing is WRONG.


Part-Time and Full-Time 4x4 systems...

A part-time 4x4 system called Commandtrac is in all Wranglers together with low-end Cherokees and Liberties. A part-time 4x4 system locks the front and rear driveshafts together inside the transfer case so they drive the front and rear axles together in lock step. Because they are locked together, the front and rear tires must rotate at the exact same rpms. However, the front tires must rotate faster than the rear tires during any turn so a part-time system fights that... which makes a part-time system inappropriate on a paved road because the high level of traction on a paved road prevents the tires from slipping which would otherwise allow the front and rear tires to grudgingly rotate at different rpms. Offroad this is not a problem since the poor traction of an offroad trail allows the tires to slip as needed. But when they try to slip/rotate at different rpms on a high-traction surface, the entire drivetrain is stressed which is bad for it. This problem is called "wind-up".

In reality however, the front and rear axles really don't even turn exactly the same RPMs when you're in 4wd so you still get "wind-up" if you drove in 4wd on the street even if you drove in a perfectly straight line. Why? Because 1) you can't drive in a perfectly straight line and 2) the front and rear axle ratios are usually .01 different from each other. Like a 3.73 and 3.74, 4.10/4.11, etc.. Why the .01 ratio difference between the front and rear axles? Because the front and rear axles usually have different ring gear diameters which makes it nearly impossible for the gear manufacturers to economically make the front and rear axle ratios exactly the same. And no, they are not made .01 different on purpose to make the front or rear pull more when in 4wd, that is an old wive's tale.

Finally, a full-time 4x4 system like Selectrac is available on Grand Cherokees, Cherokees and Libertys couples the front and rear axles together, but they are not mechanically locked together like they are with a part-time 4wd system. The front-to-rear axle coupling can be done via either a differential like the Selectrac system uses (just just like what is in the center of an "open" axle) or a fluid (viscous) coupler. The benefit to a full-time 4wd system is that because the front and rear axles are not mechanically locked together, the front and rear tires/axles can rotate at different rpms from each other. This allows a vehicle with a full-time 4wd system to drive in 4wd "full time" on a paved road without problem since there is no 'wind-up' problem to harm the drivetrain. You cannot get a full-time 4x4 system in a Wrangler from the factory.



HOPE THIS HELPS.

Sep 08, 2012 | 2002 Jeep Wrangler

2 Answers

Purchased focus sport 2006 model no service manual. Mileage 43,000 kms. Need to know service intervals either time/mileage perhaps a copy of the service schedule will suffice.


These maintenance intervals come from the maintenance interval calculator
at www.autozone.com, using a starting point of 25,800 miles (43000 km), and
assuming 1000 miles (1666 km) driven per month, and "severe driving conditions," which
are actually normal usage characteristics, such as frequent short trips, urban driving, waiting in traffic, driving in hot weather, trips under 16 km in cold weather, etc.

STARTING MILEAGE: 25800 (43,000 Kilometers)
Item
Action
Service History

20000 miles or 32000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate


21000 miles or 33600 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


24000 miles or 38400 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


25000 miles or 40000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate


27000 miles or 43200 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


30000 miles or 48000 kilometers

Battery Check
Air Filter Element Check
Wheel Bearing Lubricate
Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Fuel Filter Replace
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Fluid - A/T Replace
Cabin Air Filter Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Cooling System Inspect
Wheel Bearing Inspect
Ball Joint Inspect
Drive/Propeller Shaft Inspect
Exhaust System Inspect
Steering and Suspension Inspect
Heat Shield, Exhaust Inspect
Tires Rotate


33000 miles or 52800 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


35000 miles or 56000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate


36000 miles or 57600 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


39000 miles or 62400 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


40000 miles or 64000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate



42000 miles or 67200 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


45000 miles or 72000 kilometers

Battery Check
Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Fuel Filter Replace
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Cabin Air Filter Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Cooling System Inspect
Wheel Bearing Inspect
Ball Joint Inspect
Drive/Propeller Shaft Inspect
Steering and Suspension Inspect
Tires Rotate


48000 miles or 76800 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


50000 miles or 80000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate


51000 miles or 81600 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


54000 miles or 86400 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


55000 miles or 88000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate


57000 miles or 91200 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


60000 miles or 96000 kilometers

Battery Check
Air Filter Element Check
Wheel Bearing Lubricate
Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Fuel Filter Replace
Spark Plug Replace
Fluid Filter - A/T Replace
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Fluid - A/T Replace
Cabin Air Filter Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Cooling System Inspect
Wheel Bearing Inspect
Ball Joint Inspect
Drive/Propeller Shaft Inspect
Exhaust System Inspect
Steering and Suspension Inspect
Heat Shield, Exhaust Inspect
Tires Rotate


63000 miles or 100800 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


65000 miles or 104000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate


66000 miles or 105600 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


69000 miles or 110400 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


70000 miles or 112000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate


72000 miles or 115200 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


75000 miles or 120000 kilometers

Battery Check
Air Filter Element Check
Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Fuel Filter Replace
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Cabin Air Filter Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Cooling System Inspect
Wheel Bearing Inspect
Ball Joint Inspect
Drive/Propeller Shaft Inspect
Steering and Suspension Inspect
Tires Rotate


78000 miles or 124800 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


80000 miles or 128000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate



And you can continue the pattern from there...

May 14, 2011 | Ford Focus Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

Do i need to replace all 4 tires on my 1998 mazda mpv if only two are bad (the other 2 almost new)?


Replacing two should be fine. The only problem would come if they were both on one side, as opposed to both front or both back. But if thats the case, the tire center can rotate the tires to the optimum position. Most tire centers prefer to put new tires on the front of a car and put the older ones on the back as this provides better traction in wet driving conditions.

Mar 04, 2011 | 1998 Mazda MPV

1 Answer

I have a 2006 Toyota Highlander I have 31150 miles on it and was just told I need to replace all 4 tires for the second time This will be my thiird set...the dealership gave me a nonsense excues and...


alot of things could be causing excessive tire wear i would imagine the dealership would of told you if there was front end problems so we can rule that out but two more important things are rotating tires every 3000 miles and checking and or making adjustment on alighnments atleast twice a year. the angle that would cause the worst tire wear and is almost always the angle that is out is toe. I would start with a alighnment and making sure your tires are rotated

Feb 07, 2011 | Toyota Highlander Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

When i turn sharp while reversing (out of the drive way) the front end makes a very loud noise, sort of like a rubbing or something grabbing. Also when in 4 HI or 4 Low i can bearly ever turn without the...


if you are turing sharp, your tires may be rubbing. a way to check is turn your tires all the way to one side and look under on both sides and then turn them the other way and do the same thing. while you are looking under the vehicle look for any shiny polished metal. this will be a sign that your tire are rubbing.

As far as your problems with 4hi and 4low, if it happens on dry pavement, that is actually normal. your four wheel drive system is set up to engage to assist with traction. your tire while doing so will be rotating at different speeds as needed to ensure proper traction is achieved.

Oct 27, 2009 | 2000 Ford Explorer

1 Answer

Service traction system light on after getting new tire


wheel bearing about to go bad.. Notice any slight roaring noise??

Mar 17, 2009 | 2003 Oldsmobile Silhouette

1 Answer

1996 Acura Integra LS


need to replace the strut

Sep 09, 2008 | 1996 Acura Integra GS-R

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