Question about 1994 Ford Taurus

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Cam seals were leaking on my 95 Taurus SHO 3.0 MTX, I stripped it down and and before I removed the timing belt I noticed the crank was lined up (timing wise) and the right (front) cam gear sprocket was lined up (timing wise) but the left cam gear sprocket was NOT LINED UP dead center, it was almost a quarter turn to advanced (2:00-2:30 position). Since the cam has a "dowel" pin to set the sprocket position I cannot simply re-adjust the sprocket position to suit dead center. This vehicle ran fine before cam seals process started to fix oil leak so I am unsure if I just reinstall the belt as is or I have to undertake a different process to acheive dead center for belt reinstall. I am also curious to know why it ran so good if the belt, cam sprocket and crank sprocket lines were not lined up as reqiured ?

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

john631068
  • 172 Answers

SOURCE: Timing marks on 1999 Ford Ranger 2.5L.

Rotate the engine so that No. 1 cylinder is at TDC on the compression stroke. Check that the timing marks are aligned on the camshaft and crankshaft pulleys. An access plug is provided in the cam belt cover so that the camshaft timing can be checked without removal of the cover or any other parts. Set the crankshaft to TDC by aligning the timing mark on the crank pulley with the TDC mark on the belt cover. Look through the access hole in the belt cover to make sure that the timing mark on the cam drive sprocket is lined up with the pointer on the inner belt cover.

  1. Loosen the alternator retaining bolts and remove the drive belt from the pulleys. Remove the water pump pulley.
  2. Loosen and position the power steering pump mounting bracket and position it aside.
  3. Remove the four timing belt outer cover retaining bolts and remove the cover. Remove the crankshaft pulley and belt guide.
  4. Loosen the belt tensioner pulley assembly, then position a camshaft belt adjuster tool (T74P-6254-A or equivalent) on the tension spring rollpin and retract the belt tensioner away from the timing belt. Tighten the adjustment bolt to lock the tensioner in the retracted position.
  5. Remove the timing belt.

To install:
  1. Install the new belt over the crankshaft sprocket and then counterclockwise over the auxiliary and camshaft sprockets, making sure the lugs on the belt properly engage the sprocket teeth on the pulleys. Be careful not to rotate the pulleys when installing the belt.
  2. Release the timing belt tensioner pulley, allowing the tensioner to take up the belt slack. If the spring does not have enough tension to move the roller against the belt (belt hangs loose), it might be necessary to manually push the roller against the belt and tighten the bolt.

The spring cannot be used to set belt tension; a wrench must be used on the tensioner assembly.
  1. Rotate the crankshaft two complete turns by hand (in the normal direction of rotation) to remove the slack from the belt, then tighten the tensioner adjustment and pivot bolts to specifications. Refer to the necessary illustrations. Make sure the belt is seated properly on the pulleys and that the timing marks are still in alignment when No. 1 cylinder is again at TDC/compression.
  2. Install the crankshaft pulley and belt guide.
  3. Install the timing belt cover.
  4. Install the water pump pulley and fan blades. Install upper radiator hose if necessary. Refill the cooling system.
  5. Position the alternator and drive belts, then adjust and tighten it to specifications.
  6. Start the engine and check the ignition timing. Adjust the timing, if necessary.

Posted on Nov 25, 2009

  • 10 Answers

SOURCE: My timing belt broke on my 1996 Ranger. It's a

are you sure that the tensioner is still good I have the same engine in my 94 ranger and have had to replace the tensioner 2 times

Posted on Apr 10, 2010

Testimonial: "Thanks for the suggestion. That was one thing that I had considered but it appears to be working..."

johnjohn2
  • 5763 Answers

SOURCE: 1988-1993 ford festiva leaking oil around the

This sounds like the crank seal, the engine doesnt have to be removed, in order to get to seal is like replacing the ttiming belt, and once in the timing belt i would replace the crank and cam seals, also do the timing belt, and maybe the waterpump, you will need to remove the crank pulley and then the timing covers then align timing marks for timing belt before ou remove it, with timing belt off the crank pulley then slides off the crankshaft and the seal is behind it, the cam shaft gear unbolts and the seal is behind the gear, once the gears are off then you will be able to remove the seals from the engine,heres a few diagrams to help. good luck and i hope this is helpful,60d826b.gifca916fa.gifcb2cb5a.gif

Posted on Oct 31, 2010

emissionwiz
  • 75807 Answers

SOURCE: hi removed the cam sprockets

Hello
This all depends on the year and the model and the type of engine you have.

Posted on Jul 21, 2011

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If this is a single overhead cam, possibly A15SMS (engine type):

If you have everything stripped down and can see the crank shaft gear, you will notice an arrow stamped into one of the gear teeth.
this arrow must point towards the bottom, you will notice a mark (notch) cut into the housing, line the arrow on the gear with this notch.

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1988-1993 ford festiva leaking oil around the crank pulley... could the oil be coming out of timing chain seal... are could it be a the seal on the crank shaft.. if so would i need to removle the engine to...


This sounds like the crank seal, the engine doesnt have to be removed, in order to get to seal is like replacing the ttiming belt, and once in the timing belt i would replace the crank and cam seals, also do the timing belt, and maybe the waterpump, you will need to remove the crank pulley and then the timing covers then align timing marks for timing belt before ou remove it, with timing belt off the crank pulley then slides off the crankshaft and the seal is behind it, the cam shaft gear unbolts and the seal is behind the gear, once the gears are off then you will be able to remove the seals from the engine,heres a few diagrams to help. good luck and i hope this is helpful,60d826b.gifca916fa.gifcb2cb5a.gif

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exactly. as far as your oil leaks, as mentioned by another comment,
your seals, ie. rear main, front crank, and your cam seal would of been simple to do prior to stabbing the engine, except for the cam seal you now have quite a job, if you did the install. if you paid a shop
take it back. this is not even close to good business

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