Question about 1999 Cadillac DeVille

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Engine over heats Replaced water pump and thermostat and 2 bottom water hoses

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  • Ricky Gittins
    Ricky Gittins Oct 08, 2010

    How about the fans, are they coming on ?

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Check your oil for any traces of water. The oil may be foamy or milky in color. The culprit may be a blown head gasket that over heats the coolant.

Posted on Oct 08, 2010

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2 Answers

Runs hot sometimes. Top radiator hose hot, bottom cold. What's wrong?


top hose should be hot, all water from engine goes through upper hose, then radiator to cool and out lower hose.

Jan 29, 2016 | 1997 Pontiac Sunfire

1 Answer

98 grand cherokee little heat.heater hoses hot top rad warm bottom is cold collant barely luke warm


While it doesn't seem likely, if you've changed, or had the thermostat changed.... I'd say you got a faulty thermostat. I am curious as to what your temperature gauge says the temperature of the engine and coolant is.. If your gauge is showing hot, I can think of two more possibilities... the water pump isn't pumping right... and, if the water pump isn't working right, the problem can be a cracked head or block, which can cause an airlock in the coolant system. Check the coolant or radiator cap.

Nov 14, 2013 | 1998 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Over heating already replaced thermostat new radiator new bottom hose new water pump it is still over heating


You seem to have done all posibilities. A test though to try would be remove the thermostat, put it back to gether with-out it and run the engine. Also, if you do that try it with the rad cap off so you can see if the water is circulating. It wouldn't if the water pump impellors are damaged.

good luck!

Sep 29, 2010 | 1992 Toyota Camry V6

2 Answers

Engine overheating, 2000 deville


The problem is that more heat is entering the water than is being extracted by the radiator.

But there can be a lot of causes for that. If you have a head gasket leak, it can introduce hot gasses into the water, increasing the heat load while raising the pressure in the cooling system. That in turn can push water out of the cooling system, and into the recovery reservoir, where it can't help with the cooling of the engine.

If the fins of the radiator are blocked or folded over, that part of the radiator will not contribute much to the cooling.

If the internal water passages of the radiator are blocked, the area of the radiator is effectively reduced.

A worn out bottom radiator hose can collapse from the suction of the water pump, blocking the water flow.

If the fuel mixture is too lean (not enough fuel in the given volume of air) the engine will generate quite a bit more heat, possibly overwhelming the system.

When the engine is cold, the thermostat (a valve in the hose where water exits the engine to go to the radiator) is closed. This prevents water from going to the radiator, and that in turn prevents water coming from the radiator to the engine.

Water instead leaves the engine through the heater hose near the upper radiator hose, and circulates right back to the inlet of the water pump. So the water circulated through the engine, but it has no way to shed any heat it picks up. This speeds up the warm-up process.

The water circulating this way passes by the back of the thermostat, causing the thermostat to warm up along with the water.

When the thermostat reaches its opening temperature, it starts to open, allowing some water to go out of the upper hose to the radiator, and therefore some water from the radiator to enter the engine.

Right away, the water in the engine falls below the opening temperature of the thermostat and it closes.

The newly cooled water gets warmed by the engine, raising it to the opening temperature of the thermostat, and the whole process begins again. But this time, the water coming from the radiator is just a little warmer.

Eventually, the thermostat will stay at a partially opened position where the cooling by the radiator just matches the necessary heat loss through the radiator.

If there is not enough water, the surface area of the radiator is effectively less.
If the radiator is blocked, or the fan is not working properly, the surface area of the radiator is effectively less.

If the thermostat doesn't open properly, the radiator is not sufficiently utilized.

If too much heat is generated by the engine, it can over heat (heavy load at low speed will make a lot of heat without spinning the water pump fast enough, for instance).

These are a few preliminary tests to see what's going on. With a stone cold engine, start it and let it idle. The heater hose leaving the thermostat area should begin to heat up but not the upper radiator hose.

Once the heater hose starts to become uncomfortably hot, the upper radiator hose should start to warm up, slowly at first.

If the heater hose does not heat up, there might be insufficient flow throw that part of the system.

There is a quick check a shop can perform to see if you have exhaust in the water. There is a syringe they can use to draw the vapor in the radiator through a sensing liquid. If it changes color, you have a head gasket leak.

The radiator cap only need to be replaced if it is letting the coolant move into the reservoir improperly. If you coolant level remains fine, that is probably not a problem.

Jun 20, 2010 | 2001 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

Over heating, engine only, just had radiator replaced


Thermostat, is where top radiator hose connects / it could be that it is air locked /also could be water pump after removing the thermostat you should be able to see if water pump is circulating. if it was a used radiator ? it could be just as bad as the one you just changed / Have it flow tested .gallons Pier. minutes. also mack sure no kinks in hose./ let us know .Thank You.

Apr 05, 2010 | 1999 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Want to know how to change a thermostat on my 2004


It Depends on which engine you have, this is how it goes for both. I use a little RTV with a new ring as well.

THERMOSTAT REPLACEMENT (4.2L ENGINE)
Removal Procedure
1. Remove the necessary coolant from the radiator.
2. Remove the generator.
3. Loosen the outlet hose clamp at the thermostat housing. Remove the outlet hose from the thermostat housing.
4. Remove the thermostat housing bolts.
5. Remove the thermostat housing from the engine block.
6. Clean all of the surfaces of the thermostat housing.
7. Clean the sealing surface of the engine block.
Installation Procedure
1. Install the thermostat housing to the engine block.
2. Install the thermostat housing bolts.
Tighten: Tighten the bolts to 10 N.m (89 lb in).
3. Lubricate the inner diameter of the radiator hose with engine coolant.
4. Install the outlet hose to the thermostat housing. Secure the hose with the clamp.
5. Install the generator.
6. Fill the cooling system with specified coolant and concentration. Follow the correct cooling systen bleed procedure for your engine.
7. Inspect all sealing surfaces for leaks after starting the engine.
THERMOSTAT REPLACEMENT (5.3L ENGINE)
1. Drain Radiator and remove the radiator outlet hose.
2. Remove the water pump inlet bolts.
3. Remove the water pump inlet and thermostat from the water pump.
Installation Procedure
IMPORTANT: The thermostat is not serviceable separately. The water pump inlet and thermostat must be replaced as an assembly.
1. Install the thermostat and thermostat housing to the water pump.
2. Install the thermostat housing bolts.15 N.m
3. Install the radiator outlet hose.
4. Fill the cooling system with specified coolant and concentration. Follow the correct cooling systen bleed procedure for your engine.
5. Inspect all sealing surfaces for leaks after starting the engine.

Mar 17, 2010 | 2004 GMC Envoy

1 Answer

2002 dodge 1500 Changed radiator, thermostat, and hoses. No heat


Why was radiator replaced?Did it have heat before ? If it was plugged, the heater core may also be plugged. Try flushing it with a water hose in both directions. I dont know why the botton radiator hose would be cold, the radiator should be a uniform temp and the air coming through the radiator should be HOT, when the engine is at operating temp. What condition was the old coolant? if it was rusty, the water pump may have lower flow than normal.

Nov 19, 2009 | 2004 Dodge Ram 1500

2 Answers

Radiator problems


it may be a little off, but the lower water hose seldom gets very hot,, as its this hose that suplyes the engine with ""cold water"" the hot water comes out the top hose,, drains down the rad and cools on the way down then enters the engine through the bottom hose """if your engine stayes running in the normal place on the gage,,,and not over heating""" why are you spending money for nothing???""
you wont get the bottom hose to run hot unless the engine is cooking

Oct 30, 2009 | 2001 Chevrolet Tracker

2 Answers

1994 Honda Civic LX\overheating within 2 mile drive


Remove and raise upper hose at thermostat end and remove lower rad hose.
Fill rad with a hose and watch for flow from bottom rad hose and/ or bottom rad hose connecton.......water should fall though rad easily.
Honda rads are cheap.....any restriction....replace rad.

Remove thermostat....fill thermostat housing with hose and watch for water flow at bottom rad hose.
Flush good.

Remove heater hoses.......flush back and forth until a good flow is present "With heater control set to hot" if no or poor flow....replace heater core.

Stop leak can plug everything.

Also.......not likely causing over heating....but ....at your mileage,if you do not know if the timing belt has been changed.....CHANGE IT NOW!
Water pump is optional at this mileage.

Aug 23, 2009 | 1998 Honda Civic

1 Answer

Engine over heats


Sounds like your thermostat, without letting the fluid run through the engine, that particular hose is building pressure. Also check your radiator. If you remove the hoses from the top and bottom, shouldn't be but a hose clamp on each. Take your ordinary garden hose, and stick it in the top, and make sure water is flowing out the bottom. Make sure this is done safe. Get yourself 2 gallons of premix fluid, and before you take the hoses off, make sure you either take out the drain screw, or have a good drain pan available to catch the anitfreeze when it comes out. Don't want to hurt the poor animals.

Feb 13, 2009 | 2005 Chevrolet Malibu

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