Question about 1997 Honda Civic

5 Answers

Radiator fan not working

Please help !! This is what I have done so far still with no results.

1) Replaced thermostat
2) Replaced fan switch
3) Changed the relay (swopped with another) and checked fuse.
4) Ran the fan directly from the battery and it works

But the fine just does not kick in at all whne engine is hot. Please help !!

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  • Hondavtec May 29, 2008

    Forgot to mention that this is for a 1997 Honda Civic Vtec

  • Anonymous Jun 16, 2008

    my resevor is always overflowing fan go on new thermostat



  • joe 95 civic Jul 18, 2008

    replaced fan relay with another one. still overheats. I also have the overflow tank level rising -- makes me think that the proper vacuum is not being created to reverse the flow of coolant back into the radiator.

  • mtplus Jul 28, 2008

    I have the exact same problem with 97 Civic LX - cooling fan not coming on/

    I have checked:

    - fuse is good

    - relay is good

    - cooling fan is good (wired it directly to battery)

    Also start car and turn of A/C should make both cooling and condensor fan run, but only condensor fan runs. My take from this is that the problem is not the Engine Coolant Temperature switch.



    Any other suggestions would be welcome.



    Thanks

  • Anonymous Nov 26, 2008

    i have a 95 civic and have replaced the radiator fan motor, the thermostat, and the relay switch, the issue keeps going on the fan wont turn on but i did notice when i replcaed the relay switch the fan powerd on no hassles and now doesnt any longer.. i havent checked the fuse inside yet but i will and might check if the relay switch still works..

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On some car, like in my renault, there is an additional fuse box near the engine.
Buy the complete Haynes manual for your car, it will show diagrams and picture of all parts, and eventually tell you which fuses and parts are involved in the radiator fan wiring.
Once you have the diagram you follow the circuit leading to fan and find the fault, it shouldn't be complicate.

Posted on May 29, 2008

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  • Master
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Hi,

I am assuming that you are referring to the radiator fan. You need to verify that the fan motor is receiving 12V when it is supposed to be kicking in (engine hot) with a DVM (voltmeter) in its actual location. Having done this and likewise verifying that the ground is properly attached/connected, then your problem would be with the "clutch". Radiator fan clutch differs from aircon compressor clutch which is electrical and the transmission clutch which is mechanical. Most radiator auxiliary fans (not directly coupled) uses "silica oil". This oil has an inverse property, that is when hot it gets thicker and thus the rotation of the motor is transferred to the blades. There would be a filling hole adequately plug in or near the front of the fan assembly.

If your concern is not corrected by the addition of silica oil or if you can not measure 12V on the fan connector itself when it is supposed to kick in, then chances are your problem is electrically related. Some fan motor switching systems are coupled to the aircon switching.

Hope this be of initial help/idea. Pls post back how things turned up or should you need additional information.

Good luck and kind regards.

Thank you for using FixYa.

Posted on May 29, 2008

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I'm having the same problem in my 2000 honda civic lx except I replaced the radiator fan switch and then drove the car all day it was fine. Even with the a/c on it was great. On my way home it started overheating again. I did replace the thermostat... Any ideas? Plz help

Posted on Apr 01, 2013

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Hi,

I had the same problem. Today i Fix it!!!! Check the timing belt. Mine was a littlle off, and set it in Time and BOOM it WORK Thermostate running and fan working.



Posted on Aug 16, 2009

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  • Contributor
  • 32 Answers

One option is to have your radiator overhauled and cleaned. the water might not be circulating smoothly in the radiator that explains why your water in the reservoir is overflowing and your temp sensor is not sensing the circulating water because there might not be circulation.

Posted on Nov 08, 2008

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SOURCE: Radiator fan not working

Javier23, I see you replaced the fan switch, I believe you need to replace the 'cooling fan control'. This reads the coolant temp and passes info to the engine control computer, which signals the cooling fan switch to cycle on and off. It seems to be the only missing piece of the puzzle. Let me know how u make out.

Posted on Nov 26, 2008

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I have an 05rendezvous,need to locate switches for cooling system,fans aren't co ming on & now I'm going to need a new radiator,cuz plastic broke.But it broke before fans gave out.Which I changed stat


The engine cooling fan system is controlled by the body control module (BCM) and the powertrain control module (PCM) or engine control module (ECM). The BCM performs the calculations as to how long, when and what speed the cooling fans should turn on. The BCM then sends a class 2 message to the PCM/ECM to engage the cooling fan relays. If there is a malfunction with the BCM, the PCM/ECM will control the engine cooling fans independently. The engine cooling system consists of 2 electrical cooling fans and 3 fan relays. The relays are arranged in a series/parallel configuration that allows the PCM/ECM to operate both fans together at low or high speeds. The cooling fans and fan relays receive battery positive voltage from the underhood accessory wiring junction block. The ground path is provided at G100.
During low speed operation, the PCM/ECM supplies the ground path for the low speed fan relay through the low speed cooling fan relay control circuit. This energizes the cooling fan 1 relay coil, closes the relay contacts, and supplies battery positive voltage from the cool fan 1 fuse through the cooling fan motor supply voltage circuit to the left cooling fan. The ground path for the left cooling fan is through the cooling fan 2 relay and the right cooling fan. The result is a series circuit with both fans running at low speed.
During high speed operation the PCM/ECM supplies the ground path for the cooling fan 1 relay through the low speed cooling fan relay control circuit. After a 3 second delay, the PCM/ECM supplies a ground path for the cooling fan 3 or S/P relay and the cooling fan 2 relay through the high speed cooling fan relay control circuit. This energizes the cooling fan 2 relay coil, closes the relay contacts, and provides a ground path for the left cooling fan. At the same time the cooling fan 2 relay coil is energized closing the relay contacts and provides battery positive voltage from the cool fan 2 fuse on the cooling fan motor supply voltage circuit to the right cooling fan. During high speed fan operation, both engine cooling fans have there own ground path. The result is a parallel circuit with both fans running at high speed.
The BCM and PCM/ECM command Low Speed Fans on under the following conditions:
?€¢
Engine coolant temperature exceeds approximately 106?°C (223?°F).


?€¢
A/C refrigerant pressure exceeds 1 310 kPa (190 psi).


?€¢
After the vehicle is shut off if the engine coolant temperature at key-off is greater than 140?°C (284?°F) and system voltage is more than 12 volts. The fans will stay on for approximately 3 minutes.

The BCM and PCM/ECM command High Speed Fans on under the following conditions:
?€¢
Engine coolant temperature reaches 110?°C (230?°F).


?€¢
A/C refrigerant pressure exceeds 1 655 kPa (240 psi).


?€¢
When certain DTCs set.


The three relays are located in the under hood fuse / relay box ! You need to have it checked for DTC'S -diagnostic trouble codes ! An you need a GM Tech 2 scan tool !
This diagnostic procedure supports the following DTCs:
?€¢
DTC P0480 Cooling Fan 1 Relay Control Circuit


?€¢
DTC P0481 Cooling Fan 2 and 3 or S/P Relay Control Circuit


?€¢
DTC P0691 Cooling Fan 1 Relay Control Circuit Low Voltage


?€¢
DTC P0692 Cooling Fan 1 Relay Control Circuit High Voltage


?€¢
DTC P0693 Cooling Fan 2 and 3 or S/P Relay Control Circuit Low Voltage


?€¢
DTC P0694 Cooling Fan 2 and 3 or S/P Relay Control Circuit High Voltage


  1. Install a scan tool.
  2. Turn ON the ignition, with the engine OFF.
  3. With a scan tool, command the Fans Low Speed ON and OFF.
Do the low speed engine cooling fans turn ON and OFF with each command?
Go to Step 3
Go to Step 4

3

Important:: A 3 second delay occurs before the powertrain control module (PCM)/engine control module (ECM) changes the cooling fan speed.
With a scan tool, command the Fans High Speed ON and OFF.
Do the high speed engine cooling fans turn ON and OFF with each command?

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Are the cooling fans coming on ? What relay switch did you replace ?
The BCM will request low speed cooling fan operation from the PCM under the following conditions:
?€¢
Engine coolant temperature exceeds approximately 103?°C (217?°F).


?€¢
When A/C is requested and the ambient temperature is more than 10?°C (50?°F).


?€¢
A/C refrigerant pressure exceeds 1310 kPa (190 psi).


?€¢
After the vehicle is shut off if the engine coolant temperature at key-off is more than 117?°C (243?°F) and system voltage is more than 12 volts. The fans will stay on for approximately 3 minutes.


The engine cooling fan system consists of 2 electrical cooling fans and 3 fan relays. The relays are arranged in a series/parallel configuration that allows the PCM to operate both fans together at low or high speeds. The cooling fans and fan relays receive battery positive voltage from the engine wiring harness junction block. The ground path is provided at G101.
During low speed operation, the PCM supplies the ground path for the low speed fan relay through the low speed cooling fan relay control circuit. This energizes the FAN CONT #1 relay coil, closes the relay contacts, and supplies battery positive voltage from the FAN CONT #1 fuse through the cooling fan motor supply voltage circuit to the right cooling fan. The ground path for the right cooling fan is through the FAN CONT #2 relay and the left cooling fan. The result is a series circuit with both fans running at low speed.
During high speed operation the PCM supplies the ground path for the FAN CONT #1 relay through the low speed cooling fan relay control circuit. After a 3-second delay, the PCM supplies a ground path for the FAN CONT #2 relay and the FAN CONT #3 relay through the high speed cooling fan relay control circuit. This energizes the FAN CONT #2 relay coil, closes the relay contacts, and provides a ground path for the right cooling fan. At the same time the FAN CONT #3 relay coil is energized closing the relay contacts and provides battery positive voltage from the FAN CONT #2 fuse on the cooling fan motor supply voltage circuit to the left cooling fan. During high speed fan operation, both engine cooling fans have there own ground path. The result is a parallel circuit with both fans running at high speed.
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2 Inspect Radiator Radiator Fins Obstructed.
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