Question about 2001 Mitsubishi Montero

2 Answers

2001 Montero brakes. R&R rear rotor, pads & calipers but the brake pedal travel is still very slow to "reset". I am certain my front's need new rotors, pads and possibly calipers due to the pistons being out too far? Just curious if someone has any idea. Also.. anyone recommend an aftermarket master cylinder, booster and ABS part(s)? Believe these may also be bad/week. New, from dealer, would be around $1,500.00. Thanks!

Posted by on

Ad

2 Answers

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Top Expert:

    An expert who has finished #1 on the weekly Top 10 Fixya Experts Leaderboard.

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

  • Mitsubishi Master
  • 12,173 Answers

Change front pads and lube caliper guide bolts --if fluid leak from caliper piston THEN change caliper or if frozen as to abs module rarely go bad --test and check master and booster after front pads are replaced

Posted on Jul 02, 2017

Ad
  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Mitsubishi Master
  • 8,273 Answers

Disk brakes are automatically self adjusting. If you have too much travel in the pedal, bleed the brakes. Let us know if you need the procedure.

Posted on Jul 02, 2017

Ad

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 350 Answers

SOURCE: 2006 Ford Five Hundred anti-lock brake pad replacement

hi its rare the pads stick to the rotor but obviously this one was welded metal to metal so if the other sides not down to the metal you won,t have the same problem now getting the piston back into the caliper if you don,t have the tool its going to be fiddling but you need to get some pressure on the piston as to shove it back in not to much as you have stated it has to be screwed back in once a pressure has been applied [could try using you c-clamp ] then the slots in the piston insert something that will turn the piston it will locate and start to screw back your going to need pateince as it is fiddling with the correct tool you may need a few attemps but the other side should not be as bad as the piston has not gone past the point of return take your time and check for leaks when you have them all assembled yates210456

Posted on Oct 17, 2008

jmgldsmth
  • 1869 Answers

SOURCE: R&R rotors and calipers on 2005 Ford 500 to do brake job

use a large c-clamp to bottom out the caliper pistons remove the caliper bolts .slip out the pads and remove the caliper from the disk
hang the caliper from a coathanger wire to avoid damaging the brakeline after replacement of the pads;brake bleeding is not needed Rotors are held on to the axle like a wheel; with bolts

Posted on May 29, 2009

sgraves8
  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: brake pad replacement 02 Sienna

The piston goes in but the other side of the bracket has sliding pins that are probably frozen in place. Get rebuilt, loaded calipers with the brackets attached and new pads already in place for about $110 each side and the repair is easier. Just did it.

Posted on Jul 25, 2009

  • 239 Answers

SOURCE: cannot fit caliper w/new pads on rotor(rear brakes)

Squeeze the pistons with large pliere to get a little more clearance

Posted on Aug 30, 2009

  • 583 Answers

SOURCE: Repeated warping of front brake rotors. Have

do you do a lot of hills work?if so use the gears ,ifdown hill not the brakes if it is auto then slip it down i gear . make sure your rear brakes are adjusted regularly,but for the main part i would think it is the driver that is the problem,you may get an occasional faulty rotor but not three sets, over heating is the cause of your problem.dont missunderstand me chrysler brakes arent anything special but they arenot that bad , slow down

Posted on Sep 29, 2009

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Metal grinding & rattling in front end at slow speeds (<15 mph) and sometimes noise when tapping brake pedal at slow speed.


It needs to be looked at right away.It could be your brake pads are totally worn out and they are grinding on the front rotors It could also be a bad C.V. shaft or hub assembly.I'm betting on brakes.Don't be surprised if they want to replace the rotors,the brake pads,and possibly even the calipers.They should be able to tell you whats going on within 15 minutes of taking off the front tires.good luck

May 10, 2014 | 2008 Ford Focus

2 Answers

1994 dodge 2500 diesel. Put remanfactored calipers and new hoses on the front of this truck. Now I have a soft pedal that if held fades to the floor. Thought the master cyl must have a leak in it. Replaced...


Hi,
sound as if you really do have a problem!
From your description I presume that you are confident in doing your own work?
The quickest way to check your system is to use brake hose clamps to isolate each section of the braking system. I would suggest that you rent or buy a set of the clamps.

Put the truck on axle stands and make sure it's safely secured. ]
If possible have an assistant to sit in the cab and depress the brake pedal on your instructions.
Place a brake hose clamp on both front brake hoses and the rear axle hose.
Depress the brake pedal firmly.
The pedal should have minimum movement, and be rock-solid and you should not be able to depress it further.
If the pedal does go down when you apply it, the likely reason is that the Brake Master Cyl is by-passing internally, ie, only one section is active.

You stated that the M/C had been replaced. so we shall presume that the brake pedal is rock hard.
Go to the rear brake hose clamp and release it. Instruct your assistant to depress the brake pedal. If the brake pedal moves a significant distance, then (a) your rear brake shoes require adjustment (b) rhere is a leaking brake cyl, (check for brake fluid in the drum) or (c) you have a "lazy' or a piston (s) which have siezed during a brake actuation. That problem will require removing the rear brake drums for further inspection. Not the problem? Then adjust the rear brakes if required, then depress the brake pedal again. The downward travel should now be noticeably reduced.

If all is well at the rear brakes. refit the brake hose clamp. Go to the passengers side front brake and have your assistant apply the footbrake. Pedal rockhard/minimun movement? Release the brake hose clamp whilst your assist has pressure on the pedal. spin the front wheel by hand, and note if (a) the brake pedal has excessive downward travel. (b) the brake pads are contacting the brake disc, (the wheel will cease rotating and you will hear the pads contact the disc.)

Pedal displays limited downward travel and pads contact disc? Refit the brake hose clamp and go to drivers side brake and follow the same procedure. If the pedal has excessive downward travel then you have found your inital problem.

If releasing both front brake hose clamps results in excessive brake pedal travel, then the problem will be easier to address if you deal with one side first, complete the resolution, test by using the brake hose clamps, then start / complete the other faulty brake.

Whichever side you start to work on, be methodical, boring as it sounds.
remove the road wheel, but before doing so, place a hand on the top and bottom of the tyre and rock the wheel away from you and check the bearing play. If memory serves me correctly, that year Dodge has the discs in one piece with the hub.

You have removed the wheel. Now, have your assistant turn the steering onto full right lock. Before continuing, I would like to remind you that the vehicle is up on axle stands and you have secured it safely, in order to conform with accepted safety parameters, correct?

The steering is now on full right lock and you can see both disc pads. Now, very carefully check the position of the caliper in relation to the disc pads. Is there and equal spacing on each side? Now, have your assistant release the brake pedal and very carefully observe the travel of the disc pad pistons. They should retract and the hub should turn freely by hand. A very light drag is allowed between disc pad and disc, but it should NOT be discernible when you rotate the hub by hand.

With no pressure on the brake pedal, and using an appropriate tool, attempt to have the caliper pistons retract into their cylinders / bores. Completed? Use caution as it is very easy to break / damage a disc by using undue force when retracting the pistons.

There is now an obvious gap between disc pads and disc (or rotor..sorry) Now, carefully check that the pad guide pins are not deformed and that the pads ride easily on them. if a pad jams when the brakes are applied, then, when the piston retracts, when force is removed from the brake pedal. There is an appreciable gap to close, upon the next application of the brakes!

Some types of disc pad retaining /guide pins are a tight fit, and it is very easy to tilt a pad when fitting the pins, causing the disc pad to fail to retract fully, and again, displayed by a brake pedal with excessive travel.

When the brake pedal is applied, the brake fluid has to fill the caliper piston bores, then exert pressure on the piston to force it against the disc pads, and they in turn are forced into contact with the disc. If the piston has to move an appreciable distance before contacting the disc pad, that takes more brake fluid to fill the bore of the piston, and the master cylinder piston has to travel further,resulting in a brake pedal that displays excessive travel .

I notice that you did not mention the type of effort or number of applications of the brake pedal which resulted in a firm pedal.

If you fitted replacement calipers, can I presume that you fitted new guide pins to the calipers?
Last but not least, (a) are they the correct calipers for the vehicle as regards piston bore size? The brake Master cyl will not be able to fill the bores of the calipers with enough fluid to drive the pistons out to apply the disc pads, if the bores are oversized. The pedal will also display excessive travel.
(b) If the brake master cyl is overfilled, when the brakes are applied, the master cyl will force fluid to the calipers, expand the caliper pistons, but will be unable to release the application to the pistons due to the fluid being unable to return to the master cyl as the allotted reservoir space has been filled with static fluid. When the brake pedal is depressed again, the Master cyl cannot service the caliper pistons on the first stroke as the pistons are locked at full stroke / travel in the bores, resulting in the brake pedal going to the floor, or giving that impression.
HOWEVER, that condition, if the vehicle is driven any distance, will result in the obvious odor of overheated disc brake pads, and the vehicle struggling to display any state of acceleration.
(c) Are they in fact the correct disc brake pads? It would be wise to remove a guide / retainer pin and check for free movement of the pad on the remaining pin. All ok, then refit the pin which you removed and test again. The pads have to be free to move on the pins, and thus align themselves with the face of the disc / rotor when the brakes are applied. Some people coat the pins with never-seeze or hi-temp grease when fitting them, others prefer them to be dry.

In closing, I would recommend that you check the full travel AND RETRACTION of the caliper pistons in their respective bores. It is not unknown for re-built / new parts to be defective.

It would be interesting to hear if any of the above proved to be beneficial in resolving your problem.

Jan 27, 2011 | 1994 Dodge Ram

2 Answers

How to change brake pad and check rotors


Brake Pads Removal & Installation Front for_car_toy_cam_02-04_sst_frt_dsc_asm.gif

To Remove:
  1. Drain brake fluid to ½ full level in reservoir.
  2. Remove the front wheels. toy_car_cam_frontbrakepads.gif

  3. Remove the front brake caliper assembly.
  4. Remove the 2 anti-squeal shims from each of the 2 brake pads.
  5. Remove the wear indicator from each of the 2 brake pads.
To Install:
NOTE: When replacing worn pads, the anti-squeal shims must be replaced together with the pads.
toy_car_cam_frontbrakepads.gif

  1. Using a large C clamp or equivalent press piston into the caliper.
  2. Apply disc brake grease to the inside of each anti-squeal shim.
  3. Install the anti-squeal shims on each pad.
  4. Install the pad wear indicator clip to the pads.
  5. Install the pads with the pad wear indicator plate facing upward.
  6. Install the brake caliper with the 2 mounting bolts. Torque the bolts 25 ft-lb (34 Nm).
  7. Install the front wheels.
  8. Fill the master cylinder with new clean brake fluid.
  9. Pump the brake pedal several times to seat the brake pads.
Rear TMC made rear brake components toy_car_cam_tmcrearbrakes.gif

TMMK made rear brake components toy_car_cam_tmmkrearbrakes.gif

To Remove:
  1. Drain the brake fluid to ½ full level in reservoir.
  2. Remove the rear wheels.
  3. Remove the caliper slide pins.
  4. Remove the caliper slide pin bushings (TMMK made) (Kentucky).
  5. Remove the rear brake calipers.
  6. Remove the 2 brake pads with the anti-squeal shims.
  7. Remove the anti-squeal shims and pad wear indicators from brake pads.
To Install:
  1. Using a large C clamp or equivalent press the piston into the caliper.
  2. Coat both sides of the outer anti-squeal shim with pad grease.
  3. Install anti-squeal shims to each pad.
  4. Install wear indicators on the 2 brake pads.
  5. Install the caliper slide pin bushings (TMMK made) (Kentucky).
  6. Install the rear brake caliper with the slide pins. Torque the slide pins as follows:
    • TMC made (Japan): Torque the caliper slide pin 25 ft-lb (34.3 Nm)
    • TMMK made (Kentucky): Torque the caliper slide pin 34 ft-lb (47 Nm)
  7. Fill the master cylinder with new clean brake fluid.
  8. Pump the brake pedal several times to seat the brake pads.
  9. Install the rear wheels.
prev.gif next.gif Brake Rotor Removal & Installation Front To Remove:
  1. Remove the front wheels.
  2. Remove the front brake caliper assembly.
  3. Remove the front brake pads.
  4. Remove the 2 bolts and caliper mounting bracket.
  5. Place match marks on the disc and axle hub.
  6. Remove the front wheel disc.
To Install:
  1. Align the match marks and install the front disc.
  2. Install the brake caliper mounting bracket. Torque the bolts 79 ft-lb (107 Nm).
  3. Install the brake caliper. Torque the bolts 25 ft-lb (34 Nm).
  4. Install new gaskets and connect the brake hose to the caliper with the banjo fitting bolt. Torque the fitting bolt 22 ft-lb (29.4 Nm).
  5. Fill the reservoir with brake fluid.
  6. Bleed the brake system.
  7. Install the front wheel.
Rear To Remove:
  1. Remove the rear wheels.
  2. Remove the brake caliper assembly.
  3. Remove the brake pads.
  4. Remove the 2 bolts and the caliper mounting bracket.
  5. Place match marks on the disc and axle hub.
  6. Remove the rear disc.
To Install:
  1. Align the match marks and install the rear disc.
  2. Install the rear brake caliper mounting bracket. Torque the bracket bolts as follows:
    • TMC made (Japan): Torque the bracket bolt 46 ft-lb (61.8 Nm)
    • TMMK made (Kentucky): Torque the bracket bolt 34 ft-lb (47 Nm)
  3. Install the rear brake caliper with the slide pins. Torque the slide pins as follows:
    • TMC made (Japan): Torque the caliper slide pin 25 ft-lb (34.3 Nm)
    • TMMK made (Kentucky): Torque the caliper slide pin 32 ft-lb (43 Nm)
  4. Install new gaskets and connect the brake hose to the caliper with the banjo fitting bolt. Torque the fitting bolt 22 ft-lb (29.4 Nm).
  5. Fill the reservoir with brake fluid.
  6. Bleed the brake system.
  7. Install the rear wheel
prev.gif next.gif

Jan 25, 2011 | 2007 Toyota Camry

1 Answer

How can I change the rotors and brakes on a 2006 Cadillac?


Front brake
Step 1: Identify Front Disc Brake Components
brake_pads_rotor.jpg
Front Wheel Drive Brake Assembly
Most front disc brake components include: brake rotor, brake pads, brake caliper, caliper mount and brake flex hose. Brake service usual occurs between 20,000 and 40,000 miles depending on driver habits, road conditions and brake pad/ rotor materials used.
Step 2: Remove Brake Caliper to Replace Pads
brake_pad_set.jpg
Removing Brake Caliper Mounting Bolts
Locate primary caliper mounting bolts; apply wrench pressure counter-clockwise (When looking at the head of the bolt) to remove the bolts, upper and lower. Make sure the bolt threads are in good shape and replace if necessary.
Step 3: Remove Front Brake Caliper
remove_brake_caliper.jpg
Remove Front Brake Caliper
After removing the primary caliper mounting bolts lift the brake caliper off of the rotor and then tie or secure to the side, being careful not to bend or kink the brake caliper flex hose. Thoroughly inspect brake caliper and brake hoses for leakage, cracks or chaffing and replace as needed. Next remove the brake pads (If not mounted in the caliper) and secondary caliper mounting bolts. Notice how great protective gloves work, most technicians use them on the job today.
Step 4: Remove Brake Pads
remove_brake_pads.jpg
Remove Front Brake Pads
Once the brake pads have been removed, make sure if there is anti rattle hardware to transfer to the new brake pads. Some brake pad manufacturers will include the proper lube (Caliper slides) and anti-rattle hardware to ensure proper performance of their product.
Step 5: Remove Caliper Mount
remove_brake_pads_holder.jpg
Remove Caliper Mount Bracket
Finish removing secondary caliper mount bolts and remove caliper mount. Note: clean and lube caliper slides and pad friction surfaces of all foreign material or build-up.
Step 6: Remove Brake Rotor
brake_rotor.jpg
Remove Brake Rotor
With the caliper mount out of the way you can now remove the brake rotor. Sometimes it can get stuck so you may need to tap it with a hammer or use penetrating oil to free it up. Some manufacturers use small screws to hold the rotor on as well. Clean and inspect wheel studs, replace if any are damaged. Also clean bearing hub rotor mount surface to ensure the proper mounting of the new brake rotor. Inspect the ABS sensor wheel for cracks or damage and replace as needed.
Step 7: Depressing the Brake Caliper
compress_caliper.jpg
Resetting Brake Caliper
To install the new brake pads you must retract the brake caliper piston. Remove the master cylinder lid or open the brake caliper bleeder screw to allow excess brake fluid to be released if necessary. Install C clamp tool and gently tighten clamp until caliper piston is fully depressed. Note: use old brake pad to protect the caliper piston. Close the bleeders once the piston is retracted completely
Step 8: Installing New Brake Rotor
new_brake_rotor.jpg
Install Brake Rotor
Install new brake rotor, the new rotor is manufactured with a protective film over the rotor to keep it from rusting, remove protective film with brake cleaner before installing; also after the brake job is complete you may experience a small amount of smoke from the rotor when first used. This is normal and will go away after the first couple of uses.
Step 9: Installing New Front Brake Pads
new_brake_pads.jpg
Installing New Brake Pads
Reinstall the front brake caliper mount, and then install front brake pads. Make sure the pads are seated properly in the caliper mount; it must be a close fit to work properly..
Step 10: Reinstall Front Brake Caliper
front_brake_rotor_pads.jpg
Re-Install front Bake Caliper
Reinstall front brake caliper and reinstall caliper-mounting bolts, recheck all mounts and mounting bolts. Check the caliper slides to be sure there is no bind and that the caliper moves freely back and forth on the caliper slides. Bleed brake system per manufacturer's specifications to relieve any air trapped in the system. Before driving the vehicle, push the brake pedal down and let it up slowly, repeat until normal brake pedal operation resumes, this operation is forcing the brake pads to travel to the brake rotors.

Dec 18, 2010 | 2006 Cadillac STS

1 Answer

What tools needed to replace front brake pads & rotors


Brake Pads
Removal & Installation
Front





3.4L front disc brake assembly
toy_4run_34_frontbrakeassembly.gif








4.0L and 4.7L front disc brake assembly
toy_4run_frontbrakeassembly.gif



To Remove:


  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of
    this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:

    • Front wheel
    • Clip, 2 caliper pins, the anti-rattle spring then remove the 2 brake pads
      and the 4 anti-squeal shims

To Install:

CAUTION
Only replace brake pads on 1 side of the
vehicle at a time. Failure to use this procedure could cause the caliper pistons
on the opposite side of the vehicle to pop out requiring the reconditioning or
replacement of the brake caliper.


  1. Remove a small amount of brake fluid from the master cylinder.
  2. Install a used brake pad into the caliper and compress the caliper pistons.
  3. Apply disc brake grease to both sides of the inner anti-squeal shims.
  4. Install or connect the following:

    • Anti-squeal shims to the new brake pads
      NOTE: When replacing worn pads, the anti-squeal shims must be replaced
      together with the pads.

    • 2 brake pads
    • Anti-rattle spring and the 2 caliper pins
    • Clip
    • Front wheel

  5. Depress the brake pedal several times to seat the brake pads.
  6. Check the brake fluid level and top off as needed.

Rear
To Remove:


  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of
    this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:

    • Rear wheel






      toy_4run_rearcalbolts.gif



    • 2 cylinder slide pins from rear caliper assembly
    • Caliper assembly from rear caliper mounting
    • 2 brake pads with anti-squeal shims from rear caliper mounting
    • 2 anti-squeal shims from each disc brake pads
    • Pad wear indicator plate from the inner side disc brake pad
    • 4 pad support plates from the rear caliper mounting

To Install:


  1. Install or connect the following:

    • 4 pad support plates on the rear caliper mounting
    • Pad wear indicator plate on the inside brake pad
      Note: Install the pad wear indicator facing downward.

    • Anti-squeal shims on each brake pad
    • 2 disc brake pads with anti-squeal shims to the caliper assembly

  2. Apply lithium soap base glycol grease to the sliding part of 2 caliper slide
    pins.
  3. Install or connect the following:

    • Disc brake caliper assembly with 2 caliper slide pins
    • Torque to 65 ft-lbs (88 Nm)
    • Rear wheel

  4. Depress the brake pedal several times to seat the brake pads.
  5. Check the brake fluid level and top off as needed.
--- Removal & Installation
Front
To Remove:


  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of
    this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:

    • Front wheel
    • Front brake caliper assembly

  3. Make matchmarks on the disc and the axle hub.
  4. Remove the front disc.

To Install:


  1. Align matchmarks and disc onto axle hub.
  2. Install or connect the following:

    • Front brake caliper assembly with the 2 bolts

      1. Torque to 90 ft-lbs (123 Nm)

    • Front wheel

Sep 23, 2010 | 2003 Toyota 4Runner

1 Answer

How do you replace the front and rear brakes in a 2003 pontiac Grand Prix


Removal & Installation Front To Remove:
  1. Inspect the fluid level in the master cylinder reservoir. Remove fluid from the reservoir until the level is lower then half way between the MAX and MIN levels.
  2. Remove the tire and wheel assembly.
  3. Install 2 wheel nuts to secure the rotor on the hub.
  4. Remove the bottom brake caliper pin bolt.
  5. Pivot the brake caliper body upward and secure out of the way. Do NOT disconnect the hydraulic brake flexible hose from the caliper.
  6. Compress the piston back into the bore using a C-clamp. Figure of brake assembly with caliper raised showing brake pads in mounting bracket gmpc_l4.gif

  7. Remove the inboard and outboard brake pads from the brake caliper bracket.
To Install:
  1. Install the brake pad retainers and both brake pads into the caliper bracket.
  2. Pivot the brake caliper down over the brake pads and into the brake caliper bracket. Insert the lower brake caliper pin bolt and torque bolt to 70 ft-lb. (95 Nm).
  3. Reinstall the tire and wheel assembly.
  4. Lower the vehicle.
  5. Refill the master cylinder. Pump the brake pedal several times to seat the pads against the rotor.
  6. Check the master cylinder level and add fluid as necessary.
Rear To Remove:
Rear disc pads R&I gm-09-00-492.gif

  1. Inspect the fluid level in the master cylinder reservoir. Remove fluid from the reservoir until the level is lower then half way between the MAX and MIN levels.
  2. Remove the tire and wheel assembly.
  3. Install 2 wheel nuts to secure the rotor on the hub.
  4. Remove the upper caliper mounting bolt.
  5. Pivot the caliper down to access the pads.
  6. Remove the inboard and outboard pads from the caliper bracket.
  7. Remove the brake pad clips from the caliper bracket.
  8. Compress the piston back into the bore using a C-clamp and the old inner pad.
To Install:
  1. Install new brake clips in the caliper bracket.
  2. Install the inboard and outboard pads in the caliper bracket.
  3. Pivot the caliper up over the pads.
  4. Reinstall the upper mounting bolt and tighten to 32 ft. lbs. (44 Nm).
  5. Remove the 2 wheel nuts securing the rotor.
  6. Reinstall the tire and wheel assembly.
  7. Refill the master cylinder. Pump the brake pedal several times to seat the pads against the rotor.
  8. Check the master cylinder level and add fluid as necessary.
prev.gif next.gif

Aug 26, 2010 | 2003 Pontiac Grand Prix

1 Answer

Replace rear brake pads


Rear disc brake pads offer better performance and are not as affected by moisture like conventional brake shoe style brakes are. Rear disc brakes are similar to front disc brakes. The main difference is that rear disc brake systems must incorporate the emergency brake system. There are two methods widely used for the emergency brake with rear disc systems. The first system is a brake shoe inside the brake disc that is actuated by the emergency brake lever. The second is a screw style actuator inside the brake caliper. When activated the brake pads are forced into the brake disc and held tightly by the emergency brake lever.
READ COMPLETELY BEFORE STARTING
Step 1 - Identify Rear Disc Brake Components
rear_brake_pads.jpg Rear disc brake assembly includes; rear brake disc, rear brake pads, brake caliper mount and a caliper mounting screw. (Note: Some vehicles do not have the rotor mounting screw.)
Step 2 - Removing the Rear Brake Caliper Mount Bolts
rear_brake_pads_2.jpg To replace rear brake pads and rotors the rear brake caliper needs to be removed. First loosen the rear brake caliper mount bolts and remove them. Turn counter clockwise.
Step 3 - Lift Rear Brake Caliper from The Caliper Mount
rear_brake_pads_3.jpg After the caliper mount bolts have been removed, gently lift the brake caliper from the caliper mount. Inspect the caliper slides; they should move freely in the caliper mount. Remove rear brake pads and hardware.

Step 4 - Removing Caliper Mount Bolts
rear_brake_pads_4.jpg With a socket wrench or other appropriate removal tool, loosen the rear brake caliper mounting bolts. Remove bolts and lift the caliper mount and remove it from the vehicle. Remove the retaining screw from the disc mounting hole. Tap the rotor gently to release any rust that has accumulated between the rotor and bearing hub. Lift brake rotor from wheel hub holding on tightly, using both hands. You do not want to drop the rotor.

Step 5 - Removing Rear Brake Rotor
rear_brake_rotor.jpg Remove the retaining screw from the disc mounting hole, tap the rotor gently to release any rust that has accumulated between the rotor and bearing hub. Lift brake rotor from wheel hub, hold on using both hands and do not drop.

Step 6 - Install New Brake Rotor
rear_brake_rotor_2.jpg Check the new rotor against the old brake rotor to make sure they are the same size. Clean the mating surface on the wheel hub before the new brake rotor is installed. Reinstall rotor retainer screw.
Step 7 - Reset Rear Brake Caliper
rear_brakes_7.jpg Before new brake pads can be installed, the rear brake caliper must be reset. The reset tool winds the piston back into position so the new brake pads will fit. This style of brake caliper will not compress with a clamp tool; it can only be reset with the proper reset tool.
Step 8 - Reinstall Rear Caliper Mount and Install New Rear Brake Pads
rear_brake_rotor_3.jpg After the caliper has been reset, reinstall caliper mounting bolts and make sure the bolts are tight. Then match up the old brake pads to the new brake pads. They should be exactly the same except, of course; the old ones will be worn out. Check the new brake pads for proper fit and install any brake hardware that is required.
Step 9 - Remount Rear Brake Caliper
rear_brake_rotor_4.jpg Reinstall the brake caliper, align brake pad hardware and reinstall caliper mounting bolts. (Note: align the rear peg of the brake pad to the groove in the caliper piston.) Recheck and retighten all caliper and caliper mount bolts. Bleed brake system to relieve any air in the system. Before driving the vehicle, push the brake pedal down and let it up slowly. This operation forces the brake pads to travel to the brake rotors. DO NOT DRIVE VEHICLE until proper brake pedal operation resumes. When test driving vehicle listen for any unusual noises during the operation of the brakes.
WARNING! Always have the vehicle under inspection on level ground, in park with the emergency brake on. Always wear protective eyewear, gloves and necessary clothing before inspection or work begins. Never crank an engine over when anyone is near the battery or engine. Always have an operational fire extinguisher close by, obey all first aid instructions in the event of an injury. Never stand in front or behind a vehicle when cranked over or running. When engine is cranked over keep hands and clothing away from rotating components. Never move a car without proper brake pedal operation.

Jun 01, 2010 | 1995 Saab 900

3 Answers

I have a 2000 Chevy S10 ZR2 i just replaced the back brakes on it they are disk brakes. The one side i replaced the rotor and the other side i replaced the rotor and caliper. The side i replaced the rotor...


The squeaking may be coming from the brake pad vibrating. Try applying a brake silencer to the back of the brake pad. It may come in the form of a thin metal shim, to a teflon like material. Also, double check to make sure that the brake caliper has no air trapped in it.

Apr 26, 2010 | 2000 Chevrolet S-10

2 Answers

After driving for around 30 minutes, the brake


That sounds like the "Porportioning valve" is defective.
You may want to go to your local library and check out a Chilton's, or some other repair manual for the "how to" to fix yourself or take it to a tech you can trust.

Dec 28, 2009 | 2003 Hyundai Accent

2 Answers

2001 brake pad replacement 2001 nissan quest


The hard part is pressing the caliper piston abck into the caliper so you can get the new, thicker pads over the rotor. A large C Clamp works best.

SECTION 206-03: Front Disc Brake 2001 Villager Workshop Manual
REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION Pads —Front Disc Brake Removal
  1. Remove the wheel and tire assembly. For additional information, refer to Section 204-04 .
  1. Remove the front disc brake caliper bolts. torx bit. T20?
  1. Support the front disc brake caliper from the front strut and spring assembly using mechanics wire.
  1. Remove the front disc brake pads.
    1. Remove the outboard front disc brake pad.
    1. Remove the inboard front disc brake pad.
Installation
  1. s1v~us~en~file=ani_caut.gif~gen~ref.gif CAUTION: Make sure the master cylinder reservoir does not overfill and spill brake fluid while retracting the front disc brake caliper piston.
    NOTE: It is necessary to fully retract the front disc brake caliper piston in the bore before installing the front disc brake pads.
    Install the front disc brake pads.
    1. Install the inboard front disc brake pad.
    1. Install the outboard front disc brake pad.
Caution. The outer pads are left and right. put left on driver side.
  1. Position the front disc brake caliper on the front-wheel knuckle and install the brake caliper pin bolts.
  1. s1v~us~en~file=ani_caut.gif~gen~ref.gif WARNING: It is necessary to depress the brake pedal several times to position the front disc brake caliper piston before driving the vehicle.

Apr 23, 2009 | 2001 Nissan Quest

Not finding what you are looking for?
2001 Mitsubishi Montero Logo

Related Topics:

49 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Mitsubishi Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

76132 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22156 Answers

Jeff Turcotte
Jeff Turcotte

Level 3 Expert

8273 Answers

Are you a Mitsubishi Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...