Question about 2010 Porsche Cayman

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I find the impact harshness at low speed (35mph) on our terrible local roads to be intolerable. What can I do to reduce it?

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Tires Tires Tires....
I found that my 07 CS rode much better after getting better tires.
If you have TPS (tire pressure monitoring) you may get the annoying display warnings if you lower pressure by 4lbs.. as I did every time I deflated 4lbs or more. That seems to be the threshold for 19" tires.

Also if you are running 19" wheels you may consider 18".

Posted on Jan 02, 2011

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You can lower the tire pressure in your tires by about 4 lbs. This will help your ride but you may experience outer edge tire wear. The Porsche Cayman has a very stiff suspension and is never going to ride smooth no matter what you do. After all this is a full blown sports car. Sports cars do not ride smooth. You pay a penalty for great handling like your Porsche has. If you have the Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) on your car set it for comfort. Other than the tire pressure and possible a different set of tires there is nothing you can do to improve ride comfort.

Posted on Oct 05, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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1 Answer

What is the function of L in corolla s gear


Hi, I have spent some time researching this, and have come to the following evaluation:
Assuming your Toyota Corolla S is an automatic:

P, R, N, D, these are all letters on your automatic transmission that you're probably familiar with. However, you might rarely, if at all, shift into "L" on the gear shift. So what does this letter stand for? And should you use it?
L stands for low gear. When your car is in drive, or D, the automatic transmission will shift through the gears as your speed increases. When your car is in low, or L, the transmission won't shift. Instead, it remains in a low gear, and less fuel is injected into the engine. This gives you less speed, but what you sacrifice in speed you make up for in engine torque. Basically, using low gear gives the engine more power.
Torque is useful when you're towing something with your automatic. Towing requires more torque, but if you tow in drive it puts more strain on your engine as the transmission cycles through the gears. Keeping it in low gear lets you keep the torque, which makes towing easier, and reduces the stress on your engine. Another reason you might use low gear is for driving up a hill in order to give your engine the power to get up the hill without over-stressing it. Low gear is also useful for driving in snow or on icy roads, because it reduces your speed and gives you more control over the vehicle.

I hope this helped, please feel free to write a testimonial if it did :)

Oct 24, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

The steering in my 98 Buick Century is hard to turn at low speeds. Is this a steering pump issue or the rack and pinion?


Your PS pump is fine.

This vehicle has:

Variable-assist power steering: A power steering system that uses valves and speed sensors to vary the amount of steering assist according to engine or road speed. At slow speeds more steering assist is delivered and steering the wheels is easier; necessary for parking, etc.. At higher speeds, steering assist is reduced and more steering effort is required to steer the car, giving the driver greater feel of the road. Also known as Speed-sensitive power steering.

Loss of current to the magnetic coils would cause a loss of power assist at low speed. Coil resistance can be checked with an ohmmeter, and should read about two ohms. An infinite (open) reading indicates a bad coil (requires replacing the rack since the coils are not serviceable). Checking for shorts between both sides of the coil assembly and rack housing is also recommended.

Best wishes

Jan 01, 2011 | 1998 Buick Century

1 Answer

I have a t reg golf auto only done 30k but takes ages to change form second into third .


this is a computer controlled autobox.on a flat road put it into drive and without using the gas pedal let the car accelerate itself to max speed (about 35mph)then stop and do the same with only an inch of gas pedal.stop then gun it,put your foot hard down to the floor until you reach a speed that is just safe for the road conditions.
you have just reset the computer.....if you drive it gently for a few miles,you may feel a difference,if not then get it onto a diagnostic for a health check....

Aug 24, 2010 | 1999 Volkswagen Golf

1 Answer

My son's car is a Honda Accord 91 and he said that when he drives it as of late the car changes gears to high or low. Sometimes it drives well then the gears shift to slow. What problem can this be??


this is one of the first "fuzzy logic" boxes fitted by honda,
the gearchange pattern will change dependant on the driving style of the driver.
first check the trans level.then without touching the gas put car in gear and let it run to max speed(about 30/35mph).stop.
then put 1/3rd gas pedal down (keep it still)and let car go to max speed,stop.then floor the gas to a safe top speed for the test road...then stop.you have just reset the change mode.
if you drive the car with only 1/3rd gas the car will change lowdown the rev range(boring) and save you a fortune in gas...
if son drives different to you the car will know who is driving and change accordingly(takes about 30 miles to react)
it is NOT in any handbook.

Aug 04, 2010 | 1991 Honda Accord

1 Answer

When slowing down the transmission feels as if it is jerking in to the next gear.


after checking fluid level is correct, try this, to see if it improves...
into drive,let car accelerate without any gas(do not touch pedal)to max speed (about 30/35mph).stop,then with 1/3rd gas pedal,accelerate to max speed(do not move foot)stop,then foot hard to floor,upto about 60mph,then stop.then only using a max of 1/3rd gas pedal,drive for about 15miles.you have just reset the drivetrain computer setings....the car is fitted with a computer controlled fuzzy logic gearbox,it will try to make you drive as eco as poss,but if used harshly the gearchange can be harsh up and down.....
if driven gently 4th will engage at 43 mph,with a slight clunk.

Jul 30, 2010 | 2003 Volkswagen New Beetle Convertible

1 Answer

Harsh downshift into second gear when decelerating. Is there a software upgrade or would a transmission flush help?


a transmission flush may help, but try this first,without touching the gas,put the car in drive and let it get to top speed(about 30/35mph)STOP, then use 1/3rd gas pedal(do not move your foot)and let it accelerate to about 60/70mph,STOP....then,if safe,floor the gas pedal to about 60/70 mphSTOP.then drive as normal.
the gearbox is computer controlled and if you use kickdown a lot or you change gears yourself then it will be harsh,try only using 1/3rd of the gas pedal(boring)BUT you will see a massive increase in gas mileage/comfort....also check fluid level every 2k.

Jun 12, 2010 | 2006 Volkswagen Jetta

1 Answer

Idle is not stable


check for a vaccum leak or test throttle position sensor

Oct 16, 2009 | 1998 Chevrolet Blazer

1 Answer

New 2008 Hyundai sonata. undder 1300miles since we got his car every time you go 40 mph we hear a large humming sound coming from the passenger side as if the road is rough I we give alittle more gas the...


This behavior is due to the innovation of the ECT-i ( Electronic Controlled Transmission with intelligence). Major car companies are developing this type of transmissions nowadays. And, since they are in their early stages, is still not fine-tuned; ergo still under research. This doesn't mean the transmission will fail either.

The vibration indicates the car is in low revs when engaged in the last gear. Let's say it's a 5 speed auto trans... and the car is going about 35mph at 5th gear... even though the ecu in the car recognizes it should go to 4th gear, the only thing the car ecu can do is reduce the gas input, because the trans got it's own ecu, and it's not controlled by the main ecu anymore. When you
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Aug 21, 2008 | Hyundai Sonata Cars & Trucks

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