Question about 2005 Chrysler Pacifica

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The car engine turns over but will not start. No signal from crank or camshaft sensors.

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Posted on Sep 30, 2010

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P1336 trouble code ho to solve problem


P1336 Ford P1336 Ford - Crankshaft Position Or Camshaft Position Sensor Input Signal Error Share
0 ' Add Comment Possible causes
- Faulty Crankshaft Position Sensor
- Faulty Camshaft Position Sensor
- Crankshaft Position Sensor harness is open or shorted
- Crankshaft Position Sensor circuit poor electrical connection
- Camshaft Position Sensor harness is open or shorted
- Camshaft Position Sensor circuit poor electrical connection
What does this mean? When is the code detected?
The Engine Control Module (ECM) has detected a synchronization or signal error from the cam or crank sensors
Possible symptoms
- Engine Light ON (or Service Engine Soon Warning Light)
- Lack/Loss of Power
- Engine Stall
- Engine difficult to start
P1336 Ford Description
The input signal to the powertrain control module (PCM) from the crankshaft position (CKP) sensor or the camshaft position (CMP) sensor is erratic.

Read more: http://www.engine-codes.com/p1336_ford.html#ixzz3qT9Hiztc

Nov 03, 2015 | 2005 Ford Freestyle

1 Answer

Whats code po 343


Possible symptoms
- Engine Light ON (or Service Engine Soon Warning Light)
- Lack/Loss of Power
- Engine Stall
P0343 Chevrolet Description
The Camshaft Position (CMP) Sensor sensor works in conjunction with a 1X reluctor wheel on the camshaft. The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) provides a 12 volt power supply to the CMP sensor as well as a ground and a signal circuit.
The CMP sensor determines whether a cylinder is on a firing stroke or on an exhaust stroke. As the camshaft rotates, the reluctor wheel interrupts a magnetic field produced by a magnet within the sensor. The sensors internal circuitry detects this and produces a signal which the PCM reads. The PCM uses this 1X signal in combination with the Crankshaft Position sensor 24X signal in order to determine crankshaft position and stroke. This diagnostic for the Camshaft Position sensor tests for a loss of Camshaft Position sensor signal.
Observe that as long as the Crankshaft Position sensor 24X signal is available, the engine will start. The PCM can determine top dead center for all cylinders by using the Crankshaft Position sensor 24X signal alone. The Camshaft Position sensor 1X signal is used by the PCM to determine if the cylinder at top dead center is on the firing stroke, or the exhaust stroke. The system attempts synchronization and looks for an increase in engine speed indicating the engine started. If the PCM does not detect an increase in engine speed, the PCM incorrectly synchronized to the exhaust stroke and will re-sync to the opposite cam position. A slightly longer cranking time may be a symptom of this condition.

Read more: http://engine-codes.com/p0343_chevrolet.html#ixzz31FPYjyRM

Mar 26, 2014 | 2002 Chevrolet Suburban

1 Answer

2004 chrysler sebring 2.4l dohc.


Have you ever replaced the timing belt?? If not the problem is likely to be a loose worn out timing belt. A floppy belt will play havoc with the sensor signals and trigger a check engine light and a camshaft sensor code.

Jun 22, 2012 | 2002 Chrysler Sebring

1 Answer

I have a 2006 chrysler 300 2.7 engine it did not start up change spark plugs


The diagnostic procedure for EI (electronic ignition) systems varies depending on the vehicle make and model year. Always follow the procedure recommended in the vehicle manufacturer's service manual.
The following procedure is based on Chrysler EI systems. The crankshaft timing sensor and camshaft reference sensor in these systems are modified Hall-effect switches.
If a crank or cam sensor fails, the engine will not start. both of these sensor circuits can be checked with a voltmeter or lab scope.
If the sensors are receiving the correct amount of voltage and have good low-resistance ground circuits, their output should be a pulsing digital signal or voltmeter reading while the engine is cranking.
If any of these conditions do not exist, the circuit needs to be repaired or the sensor needs to be replaced. When the engine fails to start, follow these steps:
  1. Check for fault codes 11 and 43.
    • Code 11, "Ignition Reference Signal," could be caused by a defective camshaft reference signal or crankshaft timing sensor signal.
    • Code 43 is caused by low primary current in coil number 1, 2 or 3.
  2. With the engine cranking, check the voltage from the orange wire to ground on the crankshaft timing sensor and the camshaft reference sensor. fr_24.13.gif Crankshaft timing and camshaft reference sensor terminals.
    • Over 7V is satisfactory.
    • If the voltage is less than specified, repeat the test with the voltmeter connected from PCM (powertrain control module) terminal 7 to ground.
    • If the voltage is satisfactory at terminal 7 but low at the sensor orange wire, repair the open circuit or high resistance in the orange wire.
    • If the voltage is low at terminal 7, the PCM may need replacement.
      • Be sure 12V are supplied to the PCM terminal 3 with the ignition switch off or on, and 12 V must be supplied to PCM terminal 9 with the ignition switch on.
      • Check PCM ground connections on terminals 11 and 12 before PCM replacement.
  3. With the ignition switch on, check the voltage drop across the ground circuit (black/light blue wire) on the crankshaft timing sensor and the camshaft reference sensor.
    • A reading below 0.2V is satisfactory.
NOTE When using a digital voltmeter to check a crankshaft or camshaft sensor signal, crank the engine a very small amount at a time and observe the voltmeter. The voltmeter reading should cycle from almost 0 volts to a highter voltage of about 5 volts. Since digital voltmeters do not react instantly, it is difficult to see the change in voltmeter reading if the engine is cranked continually.
  1. If the readings in the previous two steps are satisfactory, connect a lab scope or digital voltmeter from the gray/black wire on the crankshaft timing sensor and the tan/yellow wire on the camshaft reference sensor to ground. fr_24.14.gif Lab scope patterns from the camshaft and crankshaft position sensors.
    • When the engine is cranking, a digital pattern should be displayed or the voltmeter should cycle between 0 and 5 volts.
    • If the voltage does not cycle, sensor replacement is required.
    • Each sensor voltage signal should cycle from low voltage to high voltage as the engine is cranked.
A no-start condition can occur if the PCM "locks up."
  • In step 2 above, if 0 volts is indicated the PCM may be faulty or it may be locked up.
  • If the PCM is locked up it will not store a fault code for the reason.
  • Basically, the PCM will lock up when it goes into a safeguard routine if the 9-volt or 5-volt reference voltage shorts to ground. This shuts down the PCM to protect it. Since it shuts down, no DTCs (Diagnostic trouble code) are stored.
  • The engine will not start as long as the ground is present. An intermittent ground will cause the engine to stop running.
  • Attempting to restart the engine without cycling the ignition switch to the full LOCK position will not start the engine, even if the ground is lifted.
    • Cycle the ignition switch to the LOCK position and wait about 5 to 10 seconds.
    • If the ground is lifted, the PCM will reset and the engine will start and run until the ground occurs again.
  • On 1996 and new SBEC III and JTEC engine controllers, there are two 5-volt reference signals. The sensors that require 5 volts are separated, thus If this signal shorts to ground the engine will still stop running, but for the first time a DTC can be set.
  • Also note, if the 9-volt reference voltage is opened, there will be no DTC stored for the crankshaft or camshaft positions sensors. With an open circuit the PCM cannot tell if the engine is cranking or not. The diagnostic routing does not begin until the PCM senses engine cranking.
For a car to start you need compression spark and fuel. If you put a rag over the schrader valve (looks like a bike tire air valve) on the metal fuel rail and push the center down with a screw driver gas should shoot out if it doesn't you have a fuel problem.They make a spark tester that goes in line between the plug and wire see if you have spark when it cranks. Look up on line for a picture of the crank sensor at auto parts web site and look for sensor front of engine just above oil pan

Nov 29, 2011 | Chrysler Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

The diagnostic test shows no signal from camshaft sensor. I checked all the wires for breaks, and I replaced the camshaft sensor code (0340). The car turns over good, but it will not start. Any ideas as to...


Cam sensor? or Crank sensor? I know that the generic definition of DTC P0340 is "No cam signal at PCM" however, a crank sensor can also be the cause of this code.

A cam sensor normally will not cause a no-start. I can cause a long crank time before starting. The cam sensor signal is only used to sync the fuel injectors. If there is no cam sensor signal the computer will start firing all of the injectors on every revolution of the crankshaft to get the engine running. A crank sensor, however, will cause a no-start condition because it is used to control spark. If there is no crank signal there is no spark...period.

Part of the troubleshooting chart for DTC P0340 on your vehicle includes inspection of the crank sensor and checking for the crank sensor signal at the Powertrain Control Module.

Dec 19, 2010 | 2000 Chrysler LHS

1 Answer

Where is the cam sensor on a 2005 dodge neon sxt 2.0


Camshaft Position Sensor-On top of engine Operation The Engine Management System (EMS) uses the camshaft position sensor to manage sequential fuel injection and as part of misfire diagnosis. The EMS constantly monitors the number of pulses on the signal circuit. The EMS compares the number of camshaft sensor reference pulses and the number of crankshaft position sensor reference pulses received. If the EMS receives an incorrect number of pulses, Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs) should be stored in the EMS. Some engine management systems will then default to multi-port or "gang-fire" injector operation. The camshaft position sensor signal is required to sequence the injector operation to the proper cylinder timing. If the camshaft position sensor or circuit is faulty, most engines will start. However, the EMS misfire diagnostic will likely be affected.
The following symptoms can be caused by an intermittent wiring connections or faulty signal to the EMS.
Related Symptoms
  • Extended crank time with a cold engine
  • Intermittent rough running
  • Unstable idle
  • Bucking
  • Hesitation
  • Stumble
  • Chuggle
  • Poor fuel economy
  • Stalling on acceleration
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Aug 05, 2010 | 2005 Dodge Neon

1 Answer

Engine cranks but wont start


Usually if no rpm signal, the vehicle won't start. Engine cranking, did you check for spark at the spark plugs? The fuel pressure you listed may have been the initial prime. It sounds like no injector pulse. The rpm signal comes from crank sensor. If your missing rpm signal, may thought is the crank sensor.
Were there any applicable trouble codes?

Apr 06, 2017 | 2001 Ford F150 Styleside SuperCrew

1 Answer

RPM's are fluctuating while driving. Turns over, but wont fire when cold. Have to hold accelerator pedal down to start when cold.


Sounds like you either need to reolace the crank sensor or the camshaft speed sensor,depending on which your engine comes with.If you tach doesn't get a signal then neither does the engine controller and it is like you are not even trying to start the car although you are in fact turning the key and cranking the engine.

Mar 24, 2010 | Eagle Vision Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I am trying to test the crank sensor on my 99 intrepid and need to know how to test


No-Start Diagnosis
The diagnostic procedure for EI (electronic ignition) systems varies depending on the vehicle make and model year. Always follow the procedure recommended in the vehicle manufacturer's service manual.
The following procedure is based on Chrysler EI systems. The crankshaft timing sensor and camshaft reference sensor in these systems are modified Hall-effect switches.
If a crank or cam sensor fails, the engine will not start. both of these sensor circuits can be checked with a voltmeter or lab scope.
If the sensors are receiving the correct amount of voltage and have good low-resistance ground circuits, their output should be a pulsing digital signal or voltmeter reading while the engine is cranking.
If any of these conditions do not exist, the circuit needs to be repaired or the sensor needs to be replaced. When the engine fails to start, follow these steps:
  1. Check for fault codes 11 and 43.
    • Code 11, "Ignition Reference Signal," could be caused by a defective camshaft reference signal or crankshaft timing sensor signal.
    • Code 43 is caused by low primary current in coil number 1, 2 or 3.
  2. With the engine cranking, check the voltage from the orange wire to ground on the crankshaft timing sensor and the camshaft reference sensor. fr_24.13.gif Crankshaft timing and camshaft reference sensor terminals.
    • Over 7V is satisfactory.
    • If the voltage is less than specified, repeat the test with the voltmeter connected from PCM (powertrain control module) terminal 7 to ground.
    • If the voltage is satisfactory at terminal 7 but low at the sensor orange wire, repair the open circuit or high resistance in the orange wire.
    • If the voltage is low at terminal 7, the PCM may need replacement.
      • Be sure 12V are supplied to the PCM terminal 3 with the ignition switch off or on, and 12 V must be supplied to PCM terminal 9 with the ignition switch on.
      • Check PCM ground connections on terminals 11 and 12 before PCM replacement.
  3. With the ignition switch on, check the voltage drop across the ground circuit (black/light blue wire) on the crankshaft timing sensor and the camshaft reference sensor.
    • A reading below 0.2V is satisfactory.
NOTE When using a digital voltmeter to check a crankshaft or camshaft sensor signal, crank the engine a very small amount at a time and observe the voltmeter. The voltmeter reading should cycle from almost 0 volts to a highter voltage of about 5 volts. Since digital voltmeters do not react instantly, it is difficult to see the change in voltmeter reading if the engine is cranked continually.
  1. If the readings in the previous two steps are satisfactory, connect a lab scope or digital voltmeter from the gray/black wire on the crankshaft timing sensor and the tan/yellow wire on the camshaft reference sensor to ground. fr_24.14.gif Lab scope patterns from the camshaft and crankshaft position sensors.
    • When the engine is cranking, a digital pattern should be displayed or the voltmeter should cycle between 0 and 5 volts.
    • If the voltage does not cycle, sensor replacement is required.
    • Each sensor voltage signal should cycle from low voltage to high voltage as the engine is cranked.
A no-start condition can occur if the PCM "locks up."
  • In step 2 above, if 0 volts is indicated the PCM may be faulty or it may be locked up.
  • If the PCM is locked up it will not store a fault code for the reason.
  • Basically, the PCM will lock up when it goes into a safeguard routine if the 9-volt or 5-volt reference voltage shorts to ground. This shuts down the PCM to protect it. Since it shuts down, no DTCs (Diagnostic trouble code) are stored.
  • The engine will not start as long as the ground is present. An intermittent ground will cause the engine to stop running.
  • Attempting to restart the engine without cycling the ignition switch to the full LOCK position will not start the engine, even if the ground is lifted.
    • Cycle the ignition switch to the LOCK position and wait about 5 to 10 seconds.
    • If the ground is lifted, the PCM will reset and the engine will start and run until the ground occurs again.
  • On 1996 and new SBEC III and JTEC engine controllers, there are two 5-volt reference signals. The sensors that require 5 volts are separated, thus If this signal shorts to ground the engine will still stop running, but for the first time a DTC can be set.
  • Also note, if the 9-volt reference voltage is opened, there will be no DTC stored for the crankshaft or camshaft positions sensors. With an open circuit the PCM cannot tell if the engine is cranking or not. The diagnostic routing does not begin until the PCM senses engine cranking.

Nov 10, 2009 | 1999 Dodge Intrepid

1 Answer

2007 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara


SUBJECT:
Long Crank Time Due To Possible Contact Of Camshaft Sensor To Camshaft Gear
OVERVIEW:
This bulletin involves the replacement of the engine camshaft sensor.
MODELS:
2007 (JK) Wrangler
NOTE: This bulletin applies to vehicles equipped with a 3.8L engine (sales code
EGT).
SYMPTOM/CONDITION:
The customer may experience one of the following conditions:
a). Long engine crank time.
b). Two engine start attempts prior to engine starting.
c). Due to the “TIP Start Feature” on automatic transmission equipped vehicles, once the
ignition key / switch has been released from the “START” position, the starter may stay
engaged for up to 10 seconds while the engine attempts to start.
The above conditions may be due to the position of the camshaft sensor to the camshaft
gear. The sensor spacer gasket may have come loose during engine assembly and
caused the camshaft sensor to be adjusted too close or in contact with the camshaft gear.
DIAGNOSIS:
If the above condition is present perform the Repair Procedure.
PARTS REQUIRED:
Qty. Part No. Description
1 04686353 Sensor, Camshaft

Jul 12, 2009 | 2007 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon 2...

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