Question about 2006 GMC Sierra 3500

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How much movement is allowable on the inner tie rod ends on a 2004 3500 gmc/

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None, all front end parts should allow no play

Posted on Sep 15, 2010

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How do I know if my inner tie rod needs replacing? Is it just the movement of the tire or does it have any noise or severe vibration while driving?


Jack up the front until the wheels are clear. Turn the steering wheel until it locks. Then grab the tire at the 9 and 3 o'clock positions and push/pull while noting how much movement there is. There should be little to none. To verify, put jack stands first, then crawl under and do the same wiggle test while watching if there is movement of the inner rod only, not the outer tie rod end, ball joint, or control arm bushings. There shouldn't be any noise or vibration unless it's ready to grenade.

Oct 15, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

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Have anyone out there ever change inner tie rods on a1995 honda odyssey?,if so simply explain,THANKS


Procedure on replacing the inner tie rod ends:


1) Raise and safely support the vehicle.

2) Remove the front wheel/tire assembly.

3) Clean the steering rod between the steering boot and outer tie rod end lock nut with a suitable penetrating lubricant and a clean cloth or shop towel.

4) Loosen the outer tie rod end locking nut 1/8 turn.

5) Loosen the steering boot clamp(s), and slide the small clamp off the boot.

6) Carefully loosen the boot and slide outward off the steering rack and onto the shaft to expose the inner steering rod mounting fastener.

7) If necessary, position the inner steering rack shaft in or out to allow for additional access.

8) Relieve the steering rod nut locking tab from the inner steering rack shaft, then loosen the steering rod ball socket nut 1 turn.

9) Matchmark the tie rod end to the threaded shaft.

10) Remove the cotter key and castle nut from the outer tie rod end threaded spindle, and using a tie rod end removal tool, remove the tie rod from the steering knuckle.

11) Hold the tie rod with a wrench, and remove the outer tie rod end from the threaded rod, counting the number of complete turns it takes to remove the tie rod end from the shaft. Write the number of turns on a piece of note paper.

12) Remove the tie rod end lock nut from the threaded steering shaft.

13) Slide the steering rack boot off the shaft.

14) Remove the inner steering rod ball socket nut from the inner steering rack shaft.

To install:

1) Inspect the tie rod end for looseness, and the steering rack boot and tie rod end boot for cracks deterioration or damage and replace as necessary.

2) Clean steering rack shaft and apply a light coating of Genuine Honda Power steering fluid as necessary.

3) Apply a medium strength locking agent to the threads where the inner steering rod ball socket mounts. Use a new locking washer and a new stop washer, and install the inner tie rod onto the steering rack shaft.

4) Tighten the inner tie rod end fastener by 58 ft. lbs. (78 Nm)

5) Peen the lock washer over the nut or onto the flat surface of the steering rack shaft.

6) Apply silicone grease to the outer circumference of the inner tie rod end ball socket, and onto the groove just outside of the socket.

7) Apply silicone grease to the inside of the small end of the steering rack boot, and slide the boot over the steering shaft and onto the rack and install the boot clamps. If the boot has air hose fittings make sure they are installed as removed.

8) Apply a light film of an anti-seize compound onto the threaded tie rod end, and install the tie rod end lock nut.

9) Install the tie rod end onto the tie rod, turning it in exactly the number of turns it took to remove it.

10) Install the tie rod end following the tie rod end installation procedure.

11) The balance of installation is the reverse of the removal procedure.

12) Check the front end alignment and adjust as necessary.

Sep 10, 2012 | 1995 Honda Odyssey

1 Answer

Front end shimmy @ 65-70 mph


I would look at replacing your ball joints and/or tie rod ends, either can cause those symptoms. The balls joints should be check by a professional.

To check your tie rods jack one front side of your car check it, then do the other;

Move the front wheels. Placing your hands on the tire at the 9 and 3 o'clock positions, move the tire back and forth rapidly. A properly tightened front end will give no signs of excess movement and should give you the feeling of the entire wheel moving back and forth tight to the hub. If there is a movement, ask a friend or partner to ascertain where the movement is coming from. There could be many places that excess movement in a front end could be coming from. The tie rod ends are the easiest to check. Generally, if there is movement in the outer tie rod end, you will see it moving near the ball area where is sits down into the knuckle of the control arm. Excess movement there will require replacement of the outer tie rod. As far as movement on the inner tie rod, place your hand on that while your helper is moving the tire in the same motion described above. Determine how excessive the movement is, if any, for an inner tie rod. Some vehicles will give off a little movement in the rack and pinion. Some vehicles will have what feels like excess movement, but have pitman arms and idler arms that will also need to be checked. Those components should only be allowing side-to-side movement.
Take some time and make sure the lower ball joint is not moving. Place your hands on the tire at 12 and 6 o'clock and try to move it up and down. Many vehicles nowadays have wheel bearing hub assemblies, and there should be absolutely no free-play whatsoever. If there is and the lower ball joint is not moving in the knuckle, chances are there's movement in the bearing. Some rear-wheel-drive vehicles have a bearing seated rotor and this can be adjusted to tighten the looseness in a bearing; however, a little movement in that type of application is generally OK.

Nov 25, 2011 | 2001 Buick LeSabre

1 Answer

How to replace inner and outer tie rods


For the inner tie rod end there is a special tool but the outer is easy make sure you count the turns taking out and then same counts going in.

Mar 06, 2011 | 1999 GMC Jimmy

1 Answer

Inner tie rod removal


The first step in replacing the inner tie rod is to remove the tie rod end. It's basically a three step process, where you start by loosening the jam nut that's used to set the alignment (toe-in or toe-out). That jam nut determines how far up the inner tie rod the tie rod end is fixed. The tie rod end is hollow and threaded, so it can be screwed on or off the inner tie rod. Any procedure for removing a tie rod will start by telling you to count the turns you unscrew the tie rod end, something that I didn't do, and I'll save the explanation for the end:-) After you loosen the jam nut, you remove the cotter pin from the post on the outer tie rod ball joint, and unscrew the nut that holds the ball joint into the tapered fitting on the steering knuckle (video to right). After you pop the outer tie end free of the steering knuckle, you can unscrew the tie rod end. from the inner tie rod, but you need to grip it with something. Inner tie rods normally have some flat surfaces or a splined surface for grabbing with pliers. In this case, I needed two pairs of visegrips and a clamp to hold the visegrips on the inner tie rod from moving in order to get the outer tie rod end broken free and turning easy. That video is below. I happen to own the shop manuals for my Dodge Omni, so I was able to study the procedure for replacing the inner tie rod in detail. I didn't follow it for a couple reason. First, they show my type of power steering rack (Saginaw vs TRW) needs to be removed from the car to change the inner tie rod. That's a lot of extra work, not to mention the fact I buried one of the crossmember bolts in my unibody and flooring repair! So I went with an inner tie rod removal kit from Harbor Freight, manufactured by U.S. General (in Taiwan). The tool is very simple, basically a large steel tub with a snap in opening for a large crows foot insert on one end and a 1/2" socket drive on the other end. The kit is shown in the photo to the lower left (which I need to replace), and a video of the procedure is shown below. The kit wasn't quite right for my car, I had to use an oversized crows foot and the ball joint housing on the inner tie rod was too long, so the flats on the housing were barely held with the crows foot positioned by hand at the very end of the tool. But I got it out.

Dec 16, 2010 | 1992 Buick LeSabre

1 Answer

Machanic said may have loose tie rods on my 99 toyota corolla how can i tell and how do i fix, also how do i chang a o2 censer, does it uscrew and u just plug in new one and screw back in or do i need...


to check the tie rods you jack up the front of the car. Place your hands at the 9 and 3 o'clock positions on the tire. Push/pull on the tire. If you feel movement than look carefully at the out tie rod while you push or pull and see if it moves. If it does it is bad if it doesn't than the inner toe rod is bad. PYou will not be able to do the inner tie rod without some specialty tools.

The outer tie rods can be replaced by removing the tire, loosen the jam nut that holds the inner tie rod tight to the outer tie rod, removing the cotter pin (if it has one) from the tie rod end, remove the nut that secures the tie rod end to the knuckle, Hit the knuckle with a hammer where the tie rod goes through the knuckle until the tie rod comes loose from the knuckle (do not strike the tie rod end), remove the tie rod end from the knuckle and unscrew from inner tie rod counting the number of turns it takes to remove, install the new one using the same amount of turns.

After putting it back together you'll need to grease the new tie rod ends if equipped with grease zerks and have the car aligned.

The O2 sensor unthreads from the exhaust manifold as you thought. It will require an O2 socket which is a 7/8" socket with an opening down the side for the wiring harness to go through. you should be able to purchase the socket from the parts store that you purchase the O2 sensor at. DO NOT GET A UNIVERSAL FIT OR CHEAP AFTERMARKET BRAND, this will cause more problems and more money than just getting a good quality sensor from a reputable supplier or straight from the dealer.

Nov 21, 2010 | 1999 Toyota Corolla

1 Answer

How are the tie rod ends connected to the rack unit at the opposite end of the tie rod from the wheel ? The Tie rod is free to turn. Is this normal ??


The inner tie rod is threaded onto the rack. There is a tool called an inner tie rod end tool, than will help make it a lot easier to remove. The tool can be found at any good parts store or tool store. The shaft of the inner tie rod will spin. It has a ball that is pressed into a socket. The socket is the part that has the threads onto the rack.

The way you tell if they are back is by grabbing the tire at the 3 and 6 position and pushing/pulling. If you feel any movement than look carefully at the inner tie rod and the outer tie rod to see which one is letting the wheel move.

Sep 27, 2010 | Oldsmobile Silhouette Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Knock in stering when turning the wheels from side to side


Possible Tie rod ends, inner or outters cause that type of noise, loose steering mount bolts in the undercarge, binding steering shaft and or binding movement of the half shaft .

Ball joints as well can make that noise, need to isolate the problem. Turn the vehicle off with the key in the ON position have someone move the wheel slightly side to side while u have your hand at the outter tie rod ends, then u will want to raise the front end up , and wiggle the wheel side to side to see if the inner tie rod ends have play or making the noise,.

Good Luck

Aug 24, 2010 | 2005 Buick LaCrosse

1 Answer

Replace inner tie rod ends on 2005 gmc 1500 . have ev370 moog parts is there a special tool 2 remove the inner rod ends from rack &pinnion. Ihave the tools 4 the outer but the inner looks like a big...


Yes, there is an inner tie rod end wrench, there are a few different types of wrenches available. You should be able to borrow one from one of your local parts stores. (Oreillys, Auto Zone, Napa, etc..)

May 31, 2010 | 2005 GMC Sierra

1 Answer

How difficult to replace inner tie rod end on 06 silverado 2wd?


Not that hard, just spray the tie rod sleeve with WD40 night before and let it soak in. Remove the collier pin and and nut and hammer the old inner tie rod end out of the Track rod with a 5 pound sledge hammer. Remove the inner tie rod end from the sleeve and don't forget to mark the distance so you can place the new tie rod end at the same length. Reinstall the inner tie rod end to the Track rod and tighten the nut and replace the collier pin with a new one. Grease the fitting and go for a test drive, if the truck does not wonder then your good to go with out a alignment. Good luck and hope this helps, Note, make sure you have to right inner tie rod ends. Each side has different thread rotations.

Jun 03, 2009 | 2006 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 2WD

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